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Samuel C. Dudley, M.D., Ph.D.

Research Laboratory

LAB INFORMATION AVAILABLE POSITIONS PUBLICATIONS ALUMNI & FRIENDS PATENTS WEB RESOURCES CONTACT US RESEARCH PERSONNEL

Welcome to Dr. Samuel C. Dudley's cardiovascular research laboratory.


The laboratory spans from the basic science to investigator-initiated clinical trials.

The laboratory has pioneered many advances in the understanding of the cardiac Na+ channel. He has contributed to understanding the structure, regulation, and pathophysiology of the channel. The laboratory was the first 1) to demonstrate the spatial organization of the channel domains, 2) to clone and describe the function of the full-length mouse and human promoters, 3) to describe transcriptional effects of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), 4) to identify a new gene and mechanism for Brugada syndrome, and 5) to identify transcription dysregulation in human heart failure (HF) that could contribute to arrhythmic risk. These discoveries have lead to more accurate rational drug design, a plausible hypothesis for the anti-arrhythmic effects of RAS inhibitors, a possible blood test to predict arrhythmic risk in HF, and a potential new treatment for this risk. To understand how the RAS system and reactive oxygen species affect ion channels, the laboratory has developed mice over-expressing the angiotensin-converting enzyme in the heart and showed the mice have increased cardiac superoxide production and sudden death, marked by slow conduction and downregulation of Na+ channels and connexins. Continuation of this work was recently supported by a new NIH grant award.

In addition, the laboratory has developed a new line of research centered on the role of oxidative stress in atrial fibrillation (AF). He has been able to show that AF results in increased oxidative stress, most predominantly in the left atrium. This is coupled with endocardial remodeling contributing to the propensity for thrombus formation in this chamber and may represent part of the reason for the success of ablation strategies focused on this chamber. This research has led to insights into oxidative stress and diastolic HF, a potential new blood test for AF risk, and a human clinical trial to see statins will reduce atrial fibrillation (AF) recurrences.

In an additional line of work, the laboratory has been developing tissue engineered approaches for cardiac cell replacement. The laboratory was one of the earliest in the development of embryonic stem cells for this use and recently describe a new approach to increase cell engraftment.

RECENT LABORATORY NEWS

Dr. Dudley's laboratory was awarded recently funding by the National Institutes of Health for the application titled "Oxidative Stress and Left Ventricular Diastolic Function" as part of a Program Project Grant.

Dr. Dudley was recently inducted in the American Society of Clinical Investigation.

GRANTS AND PUBLICATIONS

View NIH Grants on CRISP »
View Publications on PubMed »


SAMUEL DUDLEY, MD. AVAILABLE POSITIONS PUBLICATIONS ALUMNI & FRIENDS PATENTS WEB RESOURCES CONTACT US RESEARCH PERSONNEL