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The A3C Connection, July/August/September 1998 The A3C Connection
July/Aug/Sept 1998 Contents What's New at the ACCC ACCC Free Public Labs The Case of the 100-Year-Old Babies The Year 2000, UIC, and You Microcomputer Software and Hardware
What Does Y2K Compliant Mean? The ACCC Y2K Plan The Right Format for Dates ACCC Free Seminars, Fall '98 About the A3C Connection  

The ACCC's Y2K Plan

 
The ACCC Beat Everyone 
 
     
 
     
We Have Lots of Y2K-Sensitive Stuff
  As you might expect, given that we're the Academic Computing and Communications Center, we have lots of stuff that might have problems with the year 2000. Fortunately, much of what we use now are commercial products, so we hope to be able to solve most of our own year 2000 problems with vendor-supplied upgrades. (These days we're making a specific effort to use non-modified commercial products as much as we can. We learned the hard way that this is a good thing: by having invented several wheels that we've had to re-reinvent time after time, as we upgrade, replace, or add new systems.) But we also have a lot of homegrown stuff.

The first step for anyone in approaching their Y2K problems is to come up with a plan of attack; ours is the one outlined in The Y2K Problem, UIC, and You, and is detailed on the UIC Year 2000 Web site at ACCC Y2K STATUS, under UIC CAMPUS STATUS: http://www.uic.edu/year2000/accc/y2kaccc.html

  1. Take the Year 2000 Pledge.
  2. Make a list. List every piece of hardware, every software package, every hand-built program and macro, every embedded system, and every data set that might be affected.
  3. Organize the list. Are we going to throw this out or replace it before the year 2000 will become a problem? Whose responsibility is it to do the testing and provide the fix for this -- ours or the vendors? How important is it? How long will it take to fix?
  4. Research, test, fix, and retest.
The most important part of any Y2K project is the "make a list" step -- you clearly can't fix any system that you don't think of checking.

The responsibility for generating the ACCC Year 2000 systems list is roughly organized by group within the ACCC:

Network:
the UIC campus network and the ACCC dialin lines, both hardware and software
Communications:
UIC telephones, voice mail, and pagers, including all hardware, software, networks, and billing
Instructional Technology:
ACCC-supported online communications packages and servers
Network Services:
ACCC-supported databases, computer accounts and billing, some electronic mail servers and services, Web servers and services, and some UNIX software
Small Systems:
personal computer labs, both software and hardware; printers in general and printing from the labs; and ACCC Novell network services, both hardware and software
UNIX:
hardware, software, operating systems, and services on borg, tigger, icarus, and a number of UNIX service machines, including the machines that provide UIC electronic mail services
The ACCC Y2K system lists on the UIC Year 2000 Web site include the current Y2K status of ACCC-supported systems.
 
     
We Need to Talk
  Because the UIC community, both as a group and as individuals, has so much to consider, we have formed a UIC Year 2000 Committee; our email address is given below. There's also UIC2000-L, a UIC Year 2000 email discussion list that we hope will provide a campuswide forum for the discussion of Y2K questions, where people will share their Y2K problems and solutions. To subscribe to UIC2000-L, send an email message to listserv@listserv.uic.edu containing this single line in its body:
subscribe UIC2000-L Your Name
As we said when we began this series of articles, individual Y2K problems are often pretty easy to fix -- the problem is finding them all before something breaks. If you have any questions or comments about the Year 2000, or, in particular, any ideas about things we may have overlooked, please let us know.
Comments are welcome; please send them to
UIC Year 2000 Group, UIC2000@uic.edu
 
The A3C Connection, July/Aug/Sept 1998 Previous:  What Does Y2K Compliant Mean? Next:  The Right Format for Dates


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