Date: Wed, 17 Jan 2007 00:18:06 -0600
From: "ESCO automatic digest system" <LISTSERV@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU>
Subject: ESCO Digest - 12 Jan 2007 to 16 Jan 2007 (#2007-7)
To: ESCO@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU

There are 7 messages totalling 589 lines in this issue.

Topics of the day:
1. MEAW
2. Introral Nance fabrication
3. IMTEC Implant Driver problem...but love the system
4. FDA notice to Pharmacies compounding Topical Anesthetics
5. Donnatal Tablets/Sal-tropine
6. Re:

 

Date: Sun, 14 Jan 2007 07:17:28 EST
From: DRGSCOTT@AOL.COM
Subject: MEAW

Brett,

I can try to explain but may not succeed:  With the loops, the teeth are treated as individual units and move more independently than they can with a wire that doesn't have the "breaker" effect of the loop.  The loop offers a much more gentle influence than even a nitinol wire that has a very short span between teeth and essentially no interdental flexibility.  The length of the wire between teeth is very great with the loop.  As you get further along in treatment, especially in opening bites rather than closing them, the loops are needed to extrude teeth.  One thing I can assure you is this; you can use curved nitinol wires and elastics for years and not achieve the same effect that Dr. Sato gets with the MEAW wires.  I have tried it many times over my 20 years in ortho.  As far as the bracket, it doesn't matter which one you use.  I use a straight wire bracket.  If it wasn't for having to bend the wires, which nobody seems to want to do anymore, the MEAW technique would be widely accepted because of the results.  Those loops just seem to turn orthodontists off. Greg In a message dated 1/13/2007 1:34:12 AM Eastern Standard Time, LISTSERV@LISTSERV.UIC.EDU writes:
Hi Greg,
I have posed this question before, but received no reply, so here it is again.  Can you tell me where the magic lies in this "technique"?  The literature on this is very thin on the ground.  From what I can see it is combining flexible archwires with vertical elastics.  Is this correct?
As a part-time academic and a full-time sceptic, I would like to know what the advantage of this technique would be over NiTi wires and the same elastics?
If, as I suspect, the loops are needed because of the edgewise bracket (effects on adjacent teeth), then NiTi wires and TipEdge or Begg brackets would produce the same results in a simpler fashion.
Standing up in a hammock?
Cheers,
Brett Kerr,
Brisbane,
Australia

 

Date: Sun, 14 Jan 2007 10:42:42 +0200
From: "Dr.Joshua Wachspress" <drj@BRACESBYDRJOSH.COM>
Subject: Introral Nance fabrication

Can anyone recommend a material to fabricate a Nance button intraorally? Would a materail like Triad work?

thanks
josh wachspress

 

Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2007 18:07:51 -0600
From: "SCOTT SMORON" <scottsmoron@COMCAST.NET>
Subject: IMTEC Implant Driver problem...but love the system

I love the IMTEC screws, but I have had a problem with the implant driver. Those who use this system will be familiar, but the driver has two parts, the handle and the part that inserts into the handle and holds the implant (stem?). My problem is that the connection between the handle and stem slips. It has done this from day one. Is it designed to tell if I am loading the screw too much? Because it has slipped on implants that have held up successfully for treatment without complications. Is there a manual on it? I can find info on the implants, but nothing on the driver.

Scott Smoron

 

Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2007 16:52:00 EST
From: Tichlersax@AOL.COM
Subject: MEAW

We have been applying the MEAW technique and principles for the past 26 years in selective cases. The progress and final results never fail to astound us , so now we are photographing the changes each visit. With regard to studies and references about the diagnosis and treatment planning of the MEAW approach , we will post these on our website, WIORTHO.com .     In response to the specific question whether reverse curve archwires can accomplish the same results, we have attempted to do this , but,without  success. The vertical components of the multiloop archwire is necessary to allow  for individual tooth movement, lowering  the load deflection rate , which subsequently alters the occlusal plane, and closes the open bite.     At first, much of the treatment planning seems counter - intuitive, such as placing a reverse curve in an openbite pattern,  but eventually it all makes sense.    There is a 2 day course available on DVD, the total proceeds of which is donated to research.   The MEAW Research and Technique Foundation meets biannually. You may contact me for information if interested.    Dr. Sato's course is extraordinary. Dr. Sato is a student and colleague of Dr. Young Kim, who conceived and developed the technique. I was fortunate to be a student of Dr. Kim at B.U. ortho.  in 1967 when Dr. Giannely took over the program.   Please do not hesitate to contact me or my partner, Dr Jenny Abraham, with any questions about the subject.         

Howard Tichler

 

From: Tichlersax@aol.com
Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2007 12:40:51 EST
Subject: MEAW
To: DrJen08@aol.com

We have been applying the MEAW technique and principles for the past 26 years in selective cases. The progress and final results never fail to astound us , so now we are photographing the changes each visit. With regard to studies and references about the diagnosis and treatment planning of the MEAW approach , we will post these on our website, WIORTHO.com .     In response to the specific question whether reverse curve archwires can accomplish the same results, we have attempted to do this , but,without  success. The vertical components of the multiloop archwire allows for individual tooth movement, lowers the load deflection rate , which subsequently alters the occlusal plane, and closes the open bite.     At first, much of the treatment planning seems counter intuitive, such as placing a reverse curve in an openbite pattern,  but eventually it all makes sense.   The MEAW Research and Technique Foundation meets biannually. You may contact me for information if interested.    Dr. Sato's course is extraordinary. Dr. Sato is a student and colleague of Dr. Young Kim, who conceived and developed the technique. I was fortunate to be a student of Dr. Kim at B.U. ortho.  in 1967 when Dr. Giannely took over the program.   Please do not hesitate to contact me or my partner, Dr Jenny Abraham, with any questions about the subject.       

Howard Tichler

 

Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2007 14:53:27 -0000
From: "Paul M Thomas" <p.thomas@EARTHLINK.NET>
Subject: Re: FDA notice to Pharmacies compounding Topical Anesthetics

To all concerned.....I don't think the issue with topicals is their use per se, but perhaps using something compounded by a local pharmacy which may not have the FDA stamp. The same would go for the use of something imported from outside the country (which is unlikely to have the FDA stamp). In the event of an adverse occurrence (and they do happen as Dave Paquette mentioned) a plaintiff's attorney would salivate (almost as much as caused by topical :o) at the prospect of a large award or settlement. Why press the boundaries?? Having a surgical as wel as orthodontic background, I can only wonder with some amusement at the reluctance to use tried and true agents/methods; incuding the use of injected local. With a short (5/8's inch) needle and controlled delivery syringe such as a perijet, profound local can be delivered painlessly *without* the use of topical. (An abstract below as partial support of that contention). If the bulk of a typical anaesthetic syringe is a concer, use an insulin syringe. My 2 "pence".

Kind Regards,
Paul M Thomas

 

Date: Sat, 13 Jan 2007 09:14:22 -0600
From: "Fredric Kreul" <fkreul@CHARTER.NET>
Subject: Re: Donnatal Tablets/Sal-tropine

We previously used propanthaline bromide routinely in our office for many years, but the drug company stopped making it because of low sales and shelf life issues (according to the pharmacist). We switched to Sal-tropine (Hope pharmaceuticals) after seeing it advertised in the AJO. I don't have the product info in front of me, but a Yahoo Search should turn it up. The contraindications and risks are minimal--pregnancy, glaucoma, et al. We also advise patients to avoid rigorous exercise afterwards because the drug reduces the ability to sweat and thus can lead to overheating. We've used it on all full bondings for over five years now without incident. We purchase it through our Patterson Dental or Henry Schein rep in bulk and place one tablet in a coin envelope with an instruction label for the patient.

Fred Kreul

 

Date: Fri, 12 Jan 2007 20:49:20 +0000
From: ljerrold@OPTONLINE.NET
Subject: Re: ESCO Digest - 9 Jan 2007 to 10 Jan 2007 (#2007-5)

Scott

We have a laser now but we still pull out the old hot wire every now and then when you need to do something small, quick and easy (gingivoplasty, expose a labially soft tissue impacted canine, etc.

Larry Jerrold