ORTHOD-L Digest 692

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) text for front desk staff
        by Mary K Barkley <mkb@mediaone.net>
  3) American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics  April
 2000, Vol. 117, No. 4
        by "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
  4) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by OrthoSheff@aol.com
  5) RE: Substituting maxillary laterals for avulsed centrals: reprise
        by "Ross Hobson" <R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
  6) RE: Agenesis mandibular 5s
        by "Ross Hobson" <R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2000 18:26:47 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000413182647.007a2210@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information.  ESCO is moderated by Dr. Joseph
Zernik from the University of Southern California Department of Orthodontics.

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

2

Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2000 17:29:13 -0400
From: Mary K Barkley <mkb@mediaone.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: text for front desk staff
Message-ID: <38F247A9.71651492@mediaone.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am looking for a textbook for front desk orthodontic staff who have no
orthodontic experience. Ideally, the book would cover dental
nomenclature and orthodontic numbering, an overview of orthodontic
appliances, and a discussion of orthodontic records. Is anyone aware of
such a text?
Mary K. Barkley
Chelsea, MI

Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 09:52:59 -0500
From: "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
To: ajodo_toc@mosby.com
Subject: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics  April
 2000, Vol. 117, No. 4
Message-ID: <38F33C4B.340AC524@mosby.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Table of Contents for April 2000, Vol. 117, No. 4
http://www.mosby.com/ajodo
--------------------------------------------------------------
ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Clinical applications of composite intramembranous bone grafts
A. Bakr M. Rabie, BDS, CertOrtho, MS, PhD, Siew Han Chay, BDS
Hong Kong, SAR
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104904

Muscle activity with the mandibular lip bumper
Arndt Klocke, Drmeddent, MS, Ram S. Nanda, DDS, MS, PhD, Joydeep Ghosh,
DDS
Hamburg, Germany, MS, Oklahoma City, Okla, and Dallas, Tex
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104688

Rapid orthodontic tooth movement into newly distracted bone after
mandibular distraction osteogenesis in a canine model
Eric Jein-Wein Liou, DDS, MS, Alvaro A. Figueroa, DDS, MS, John W.
Polley, MD
Taipei, Taiwan, and Chicago, Ill
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a101439

Alveolar bone resorption and the center of resistance modification (3-D
analysis by means of the finite element method)
Allahyar Geramy, DDS, MS
Shiraz, Iran
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104689

Relationship of natural head position to craniofacial morphology
Pedro Leitao, DMD, MS, PhD, Ram S. Nanda, DDS, MS, PhD
Lisbon, Portugal, and Oklahoma City, Okla
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a102547

SPECIAL ARTICLE

For four sixes
Paul Jonathan Sandler, BDS(Hons), MSc, FDSRCPS, DOrth, MOrth, Robert
Atkinson, BDS(Hons), LDSRCS, FDSRCS, Alison Margaret Murray, BDS, MSc,
FDSRCPS, DOrth, MOrth
Chesterfield, UK
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a97617

SHORT COMMUNICATION

Useful data from application of the HLD (CalMod) INDEX
William S. Parker, DMD, PhD
Sacramento, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105878

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Shear bond strengths of orthodontic plastic brackets
Guoqiang Guan, DDS, PhD, Teruko Takano-Yamamoto, DDS, PhD, Manabu
Miyamoto, DDS, PhD, Tetsuo Hattori, DDS, PhD, Kunio Ishikawa, PhD,
Kazuomi Suzuki, PhD
Okayama, Japan
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103255

SPECIAL ARTICLE

Angle, the innovator, mechanical genius, and clinician
Claude Matasa, DCE, DSc, T. M. Graber, DMD, MSD, PhD
Hollywood, Fla, and Chicago, Ill
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106503

ABO CASE REPORTS

Treatment of a patient with a Class I malocclusion with bialveolar
protrusion, mild upper and lower crowding, and mild mandibular
prognathism
Roberto Hernandez Orsini, DMD, MPH, MS
Guaynabo, Puerto Rico
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a90184

Treatment of a Class II, Division 1, malocclusion with the extraction of
maxillary canines and mandibular first premolars
Raphael T. Schach, DDS, MS
San Antonio, Texas
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a93942

CONTINUING EDUCATION ARTICLES

A histologic and histomorphometric evaluation of pulpal reactions
following rapid palatal expansion
Fulya Kayhan, DDS, PhD, Nazan Küçükkeles, DDS, PhD, Dilaver Demirel,
DDS, PhD
Istanbul, Turkey
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103253

Basal nitric oxide production is enhanced by hydraulic pressure in
cultured human periodontal ligament fibroblasts
Chie Nakago-Matsuo, DDS, PhD, Toshihiko Matsuo, MD, PhD, Tadao Nakago,
DDS, PhD
Okayama City, Japan
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105576

Cephalometric comparisons between Chinese and Caucasian patients with
obstructive sleep apnea
Yuehua Liu, Alan A. Lowe, Xianglong Zeng, Minkui Fu, John A. Fleetham
Vancouver, BC, Canada, and Beijing, China
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a102546

Vertical components of overbite change: A mathematical model
Siegfried A. Naumann, DDS, MS, Rolf G. Behrents, DDS, PhD, Peter H.
Buschang, MA, PhD
Dallas, Tex
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103278

Continuing Education Questionnaire
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174ce

IN MEMORIAM

Lester Levern Merrifield, 1921-2000
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174498

Maurice Samuel Berman, 1914-1999
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174500

Stanley Jacobs, 1939-2000
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174501

VIGNETTE

Bernard Wolf Weinberger
Norman Wahl
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174502

ORTHO BYTES

Computer voice recognition
Ron Powers
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174504

LITIGATION, LEGISLATION, AND ETHICS

Self-incrimination in the civil arena
Laurance Jerrold, DDS, JD
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174507

DEPARTMENT OF REVIEWS AND ABSTRACTS

Contemporary Orthodontics, 3rd edition
William R. Proffit, Harry W. Fields, Jr

DIRECTORY: AAO OFFICERS AND ORGANIZATIONS

The American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies,
the American Board of Orthodontists, the American Association of
Orthodontists Foundation Board of Directors, and the College of
Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174da

NEWS, COMMENTS, AND SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS

News of dentistry and orthodontics
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174nw

READERS’ FORUM

Make no apologies
Roy K. King, PA
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117423a001

Revisiting root resorption
Inger Kjær, Dr Odont, Dr Med
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117423a002

It’s all in the details
Chuck Mertz
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117423a003

In response:
A. J. Feilzer, DDS, PhD, W. L. van Waveren, DDS, B. Prahl-Andersen, DDA,
PhD
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117424a001

Another Ricketts contribution
Arthur S. Quint
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117424a002

Muscle response to the Twin-block appliance
M. J. Trenouth
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117425a001

Follow-up on distraction osteogenesis in the mandible
Arthur S. Quint
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117425a002

READER’S SERVICES

Editorial Board
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174eb

Information for Readers
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174ir

_______________________________________________________________________
Copyright (c) 2000 by Mosby, Inc.
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Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 14:10:19 EDT
From: OrthoSheff@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
Message-ID: <a9.41cb096.2624c48b@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have an adult male patient who has been in treatment for 9 months.  Total
treatment is scheduled for 12 months.  He has fallen behind on his payments,
and has paid for only 1/2 of his treatment.  He was in today and told us that
his insurance is not paying as much as he thought they would.
He informed us that he would NOT honor his contract and that he would pay us
an amount that was considerably amount less than agreed upon.

What rights do I have as far as terminating treatment.?
Can I refuse to schedule an further appointment until his account is paid?
Can I terminate treatment, take his braces off and give him retainers?
Can I not give him retainers unless his account is paid?

What is the best way (and legal way) to approach this without "abandoning the
patient" or leaving him with an unstable occlusion?

John Shefferman
Washington, D.C.
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 23:55:25 +0100
From: "Ross Hobson" <R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
To: "Jeff Genecov" <c0018593@airmail.net>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: Substituting maxillary laterals for avulsed centrals: reprise
Message-ID: <LPBBLLBFNJPJEGLPFBLAGEAECAAA.R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0016_01BFA411.687D3AA0"
Thanks for all your replies to this difficult situation.

However a small error occurred (I should have taken typing in high school!) The sentence beginning "Her maxillary central were previously avulsed completely..." should read "maxillary centrals", meaning both were avulsed and reimplanted, and are now failing.

I can't remebr if the patinet required extractions in the lower arch - if this is the case a neat plan is to use the lower premolars into the central sockets - you need a good delicate surgeon (get him to read Andresen's book on trauma of incisors) the success rate is as good as implants.
but you need close coporeation with someone to do the RCT on the transplanted teeth then to reshape the crowns
you place the molars side on
we have used this with good results in a number of case following trauma and in hypodontia
 
ross Hobson
[Ross Hobson]
 

Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 23:55:34 +0100
From: "Ross Hobson" <R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
To: "Mark Cordato" <markc@ix.net.au>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: Agenesis mandibular 5s
Message-ID: <LPBBLLBFNJPJEGLPFBLAIEAECAAA.R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


00 1:45 PM
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Agenesis mandibular 5s
In Newcstle on our hypodontia clinic this is a common problem
if there is no lower crowding or need for retraction of the incisors we
mainatin the E's as long as possible to keep bone - if necessary building
crown height to keep the occlusion
as and when they are lost 0 acid etch bridges work very well

if there is crowding then close the space.
ps.
class III molars are perfectly stable

Ross Hobson

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 693

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu> (by way of Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>)
  2) Re: text for front desk staff
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  3) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  4) Orthodontist in Belfast area
        by "Gerald Zeit" <g.zeit@utoronto.ca>
  5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by YURFEST@aol.com
  7) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 692
        by Orthodas@aol.com
  8) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 692
        by Larry Jerrold <jerr2@idt.net>
  9) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691 Invisalign
        by DrDCarter@aol.com
 10) Moving teeth through irradiated bone
        by stuart messinger <stmessin@bellatlantic.net>
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 13:30:45 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu> (by way of Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>)
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000418133045.007a1100@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information.  ESCO is moderated by Dr. Joseph
Zernik from the University of Southern California Department of Orthodontics.

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

3

Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2000 22:53:58 -0400
From: Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: text for front desk staff
Message-ID: <38F688DE.56FFB4DB@utoronto.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

There probably are such texts but my suggestion is to close your office for
a long lunch hour (3 hours or so), order in sandwiches or pizza, and teach
your staff directly, creating the manual as you go. TGS.

Mary K Barkley wrote:

> I am looking for a textbook for front desk orthodontic staff who have no
> orthodontic experience. Ideally, the book would cover dental
> nomenclature and orthodontic numbering, an overview of orthodontic
> appliances, and a discussion of orthodontic records. Is anyone aware of
> such a text?
> Mary K. Barkley
> Chelsea, MI

Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2000 22:56:19 -0400
From: Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
Message-ID: <38F6896C.74A6C9F7@utoronto.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Laws differ. In Ontario you cannot abandon a patient for non-payment, but there
is a protocol for stopping treatment. My advice is to contact either a lawyer or
your state/provincial licensing association (or both). TGS.

OrthoSheff@aol.com wrote:

> I have an adult male patient who has been in treatment for 9 months.  Total
> treatment is scheduled for 12 months.  He has fallen behind on his payments,
> and has paid for only 1/2 of his treatment.  He was in today and told us that
> his insurance is not paying as much as he thought they would.
> He informed us that he would NOT honor his contract and that he would pay us
> an amount that was considerably amount less than agreed upon.
>
> What rights do I have as far as terminating treatment.?
> Can I refuse to schedule an further appointment until his account is paid?
> Can I terminate treatment, take his braces off and give him retainers?
> Can I not give him retainers unless his account is paid?
>
> What is the best way (and legal way) to approach this without "abandoning the
> patient" or leaving him with an unstable occlusion?
>
> John Shefferman
> Washington, D.C.

Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2000 14:38:16 -0400
From: "Gerald Zeit" <g.zeit@utoronto.ca>
To: <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: Orthodontist in Belfast area
Message-ID: <001901bfa640$3251c280$0f85968e@drzeit>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello group

I have an adult, mandibular deficient patient, who is part
way through a combined surgical-orthodontic
treatment in Toronto, Canada.  She has not had her surgery
yet.

She will be moving to Ireland (Belfast area) for about one
year.

Can anyone recommend an orthodontist/surgeon who could take
over her treatment???

Thank You

Gerry Zeit, DDS, D. Ortho
Toronto, Canada

Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2000 09:10:59 -0400
From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
To: <OrthoSheff@aol.com>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
Message-ID: <00a401bfa612$e0f77880$83b3fea9@g48sy>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

John,

You have no obligation to work for free.  What would your attorney do if you
stopped paying what you agreed to pay?

Simply inform the patient that treatment  has been terminated because of
unmet financial obligations.  Also inform him that emergency services ONLY
will be provided for 30 days.  Inform him that he needs to seek orthodontic
care because of the risks of having braces without treatment.  Then send the
letter certified.  That's all you need to do.

Dr. Ron Parsons
Orthodontist, Atlanta, GA
OrthAlliance member
Ohana Venture Capital Advisory Board




----- Original Message -----
From: <OrthoSheff@aol.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, April 11, 2000 2:10 PM
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691


> I have an adult male patient who has been in treatment for 9 months.
Total
> treatment is scheduled for 12 months.  He has fallen behind on his
payments,
> and has paid for only 1/2 of his treatment.  He was in today and told us
that
> his insurance is not paying as much as he thought they would.
> He informed us that he would NOT honor his contract and that he would pay
us
> an amount that was considerably amount less than agreed upon.
>
> What rights do I have as far as terminating treatment.?
> Can I refuse to schedule an further appointment until his account is paid?
> Can I terminate treatment, take his braces off and give him retainers?
> Can I not give him retainers unless his account is paid?
>
> What is the best way (and legal way) to approach this without "abandoning
the
> patient" or leaving him with an unstable occlusion?
>
> John Shefferman
> Washington, D.C.
>

Date: Sat, 15 Apr 2000 00:33:49 EDT
From: YURFEST@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
Message-ID: <bb.26833f0.26294b2d@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Regarding the non paying patient, our contract with our patients specifies
that I can terminate treatment for nonpayment. I send the patient a
registered letter that  he is in violation of our contract and can pick up
his records, direct where he wants them sent, get assistance in finding
another doctor, or have his braces removed.  The legal definition of
abandonment is not the same as patient "dismissal" . Check with your state
dental board for the exact procedure required to dismiss a patient.
Paul Yurfest, DDS, Atlanta GA
Date: Fri, 14 Apr 2000 13:03:37 EDT
From: Orthodas@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 692
Message-ID: <31.3b9b210.2628a969@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Re: textbook for new front desk.  If you can find something I'd like to know
about it also.  My chairsides have brought in their dental assistant texts
but there is not much on ortho.  This is a real problem for our profession. 
Al Landucci, pres of Calif Assoc Ortho, is trying to get something started to
address the staffing education problem.
Re:invisalign use - call me at 650-368-8348 or email at orthodas @aol.com and
I'd be glad to answer any questions and tell you my experiences.  You could
also talk to patients if you'd like.
Re: retained SUBMERGED lower E's.  The key here is the word submerged.  How
submerged.  As a former restorative dentist for 16 years before going into
ortho, I can tell you that the important point here is alveolar bone height
and width.  Now that there are the grafting procedures you have many more
options.  I would consult with a perio or oral surgeon who has experience
grafting and determine when would be the best time to ext and graft.  Because
the long term consequences of leaving these teeth is not good.  You can have
them restored but they will continually be a problem.  It may be that
adjusting the width now to conform to bi size and then later ext and grafting
is indicated or it may be that now is the time to remove them.
Date: Sat, 15 Apr 2000 14:07:59 -0400
From: Larry Jerrold <jerr2@idt.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 692
Message-ID: <38F8AFFF.C56FA207@idt.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------4A875A3AA9817DB4B5CF3C73"

John:

Not knowing what type of case this delinquent patient was may change things but lets assume that since it was a 12 month case it was not a biggie nor was it a significant extraction case.  My answers to your questions are several, no, no, and no.  My first question though is why would you be worried about abandoning this patient?  Look at it this way, he agreed to a treat plan, he agreed to pay a certain fee in a certain manner, and he unilaterally decided not to honor his financial obligations for his elective therapy (orthodontics is elective) and he unilaterally determines that you should treat for less.  He abandoned you!

Lets look at your questions.  Your rights are that you can (a) acquiesce to his demands and accept less or (b) tell him to take a hike and finish his treatment elsewhere.  If you are going to terminate tell him in writing why (non-payment) give him sufficient time to seek substituted care (4-8 wks.), inform him that he still needs continued care and that you will be available for emergcies only during this 4-8 weeks, that you'll make his records available to him or any subsequent treating practitioner, etc.

You cannot refuse to give him any more appointments until his account is paid.  This is consructive abandonment.

You cannot terminate in the middle of treatment and place retainers unless he agrees to accept an unfinished result as the removal of appliances and th placing of retiners may interfer with his ability to seek substituted care.

You cannot refuse to give him retainers until his account is paid.  You can only withhold clinical tratment for clinical reasons, not financial ones.

In short, you have a right to tell this bozo to pay up or take off.  Rights are funny things.  Your decision to exercise them may cost you but they are your rights to exercise.  ost Docs and Lawyerrs out the would tellyou to eat it (finish the  case and move on).  This is smart risk management as you just paid a high price for the cost of aspirin (to get rid of the headache)      It doesn't address the etiology of your headache (poor account management)

Hope this helps.

Larry Jerrold DDS, JD
orthod-l@usc.edu wrote:

                           
ORTHOD-L Digest 692

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik
<orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) text for front desk staff
        by Mary K Barkley
<mkb@mediaone.net>
  3) American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial
Orthopedics  April 
 2000, Vol. 117, No. 4
        by "Harcourt Health
Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
  4) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by OrthoSheff@aol.com
  5) RE: Substituting maxillary laterals for avulsed centrals:
reprise
        by "Ross Hobson"
<R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
  6) RE: Agenesis mandibular 5s
        by "Ross Hobson"
<R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>

Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Date: Thu, 13 Apr 2000 18:26:47 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information.  ESCO is moderated by Dr.
Joseph
Zernik from the University of Southern California Department of
Orthodontics.

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: 
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. 
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

2

Subject: text for front desk staff
Date: Mon, 10 Apr 2000 17:29:13 -0400
From: Mary K Barkley <mkb@mediaone.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
I am looking for a textbook for front desk orthodontic staff who
have no
orthodontic experience. Ideally, the book would cover dental
nomenclature and orthodontic numbering, an overview of orthodontic
appliances, and a discussion of orthodontic records. Is anyone aware of
such a text?
Mary K. Barkley
Chelsea, MI

Subject: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics April
     2000, Vol. 117, No. 4
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 09:52:59 -0500
From: "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
To: ajodo_toc@mosby.com
American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Table of Contents for April 2000, Vol. 117, No. 4
http://www.mosby.com/ajodo
--------------------------------------------------------------
ORIGINAL ARTICLES

Clinical applications of composite intramembranous bone grafts
A. Bakr M. Rabie, BDS, CertOrtho, MS, PhD, Siew Han Chay, BDS
Hong Kong, SAR
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104904

Muscle activity with the mandibular lip bumper
Arndt Klocke, Drmeddent, MS, Ram S. Nanda, DDS, MS, PhD, Joydeep Ghosh,
DDS
Hamburg, Germany, MS, Oklahoma City, Okla, and Dallas, Tex
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104688

Rapid orthodontic tooth movement into newly distracted bone after
mandibular distraction osteogenesis in a canine model
Eric Jein-Wein Liou, DDS, MS, Alvaro A. Figueroa, DDS, MS, John W.
Polley, MD
Taipei, Taiwan, and Chicago, Ill
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a101439

Alveolar bone resorption and the center of resistance modification
(3-D
analysis by means of the finite element method)
Allahyar Geramy, DDS, MS
Shiraz, Iran
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104689

Relationship of natural head position to craniofacial morphology
Pedro Leitao, DMD, MS, PhD, Ram S. Nanda, DDS, MS, PhD
Lisbon, Portugal, and Oklahoma City, Okla
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a102547

SPECIAL ARTICLE

For four sixes
Paul Jonathan Sandler, BDS(Hons), MSc, FDSRCPS, DOrth, MOrth, Robert
Atkinson, BDS(Hons), LDSRCS, FDSRCS, Alison Margaret Murray, BDS, MSc,
FDSRCPS, DOrth, MOrth
Chesterfield, UK
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a97617

SHORT COMMUNICATION

Useful data from application of the HLD (CalMod) INDEX
William S. Parker, DMD, PhD
Sacramento, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105878

ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Shear bond strengths of orthodontic plastic brackets
Guoqiang Guan, DDS, PhD, Teruko Takano-Yamamoto, DDS, PhD, Manabu
Miyamoto, DDS, PhD, Tetsuo Hattori, DDS, PhD, Kunio Ishikawa, PhD,
Kazuomi Suzuki, PhD
Okayama, Japan
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103255

SPECIAL ARTICLE

Angle, the innovator, mechanical genius, and clinician
Claude Matasa, DCE, DSc, T. M. Graber, DMD, MSD, PhD
Hollywood, Fla, and Chicago, Ill
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106503

ABO CASE REPORTS

Treatment of a patient with a Class I malocclusion with bialveolar
protrusion, mild upper and lower crowding, and mild mandibular
prognathism
Roberto Hernandez Orsini, DMD, MPH, MS
Guaynabo, Puerto Rico
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a90184

Treatment of a Class II, Division 1, malocclusion with the extraction
of
maxillary canines and mandibular first premolars
Raphael T. Schach, DDS, MS
San Antonio, Texas
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a93942

CONTINUING EDUCATION ARTICLES

A histologic and histomorphometric evaluation of pulpal reactions
following rapid palatal expansion
Fulya Kayhan, DDS, PhD, Nazan Küçükkeles, DDS, PhD, Dilaver Demirel,
DDS, PhD
Istanbul, Turkey
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103253

Basal nitric oxide production is enhanced by hydraulic pressure in
cultured human periodontal ligament fibroblasts
Chie Nakago-Matsuo, DDS, PhD, Toshihiko Matsuo, MD, PhD, Tadao Nakago,
DDS, PhD
Okayama City, Japan
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105576

Cephalometric comparisons between Chinese and Caucasian patients
with
obstructive sleep apnea
Yuehua Liu, Alan A. Lowe, Xianglong Zeng, Minkui Fu, John A. Fleetham
Vancouver, BC, Canada, and Beijing, China
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a102546

Vertical components of overbite change: A mathematical model
Siegfried A. Naumann, DDS, MS, Rolf G. Behrents, DDS, PhD, Peter H.
Buschang, MA, PhD
Dallas, Tex
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103278

Continuing Education Questionnaire
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174ce

IN MEMORIAM

Lester Levern Merrifield, 1921-2000
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174498

Maurice Samuel Berman, 1914-1999
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174500

Stanley Jacobs, 1939-2000
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174501

VIGNETTE

Bernard Wolf Weinberger
Norman Wahl
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174502

ORTHO BYTES

Computer voice recognition
Ron Powers
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174504

LITIGATION, LEGISLATION, AND ETHICS

Self-incrimination in the civil arena
Laurance Jerrold, DDS, JD
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1174507

DEPARTMENT OF REVIEWS AND ABSTRACTS

Contemporary Orthodontics, 3rd edition
William R. Proffit, Harry W. Fields, Jr

DIRECTORY: AAO OFFICERS AND ORGANIZATIONS

The American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies,
the American Board of Orthodontists, the American Association of
Orthodontists Foundation Board of Directors, and the College of
Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174da

NEWS, COMMENTS, AND SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS

News of dentistry and orthodontics
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174nw

READERS’ FORUM

Make no apologies
Roy K. King, PA
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117423a001

Revisiting root resorption
Inger Kjær, Dr Odont, Dr Med
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117423a002

It’s all in the details
Chuck Mertz
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117423a003

In response:
A. J. Feilzer, DDS, PhD, W. L. van Waveren, DDS, B. Prahl-Andersen, 
DDA,
PhD
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117424a001

Another Ricketts contribution
Arthur S. Quint
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117424a002

Muscle response to the Twin-block appliance
M. J. Trenouth
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117425a001

Follow-up on distraction osteogenesis in the mandible
Arthur S. Quint
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod117425a002

READER’S SERVICES

Editorial Board
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174eb

Information for Readers
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001174ir

_______________________________________________________________________
Copyright (c) 2000 by Mosby, Inc.
INFORMATION FOR READERS:
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Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 14:10:19 EDT
From: OrthoSheff@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
I have an adult male patient who has been in treatment for 9 months.  Total 
treatment is scheduled for 12 months.  He has fallen behind on his payments, 
and has paid for only 1/2 of his treatment.  He was in today and told us that 
his insurance is not paying as much as he thought they would.
He informed us that he would NOT honor his contract and that he would pay us 
an amount that was considerably amount less than agreed upon.

What rights do I have as far as terminating treatment.?
Can I refuse to schedule an further appointment until his account is paid?
Can I terminate treatment, take his braces off and give him retainers?
Can I not give him retainers unless his account is paid?

What is the best way (and legal way) to approach this without "abandoning the 
patient" or leaving him with an unstable occlusion?

John Shefferman
Washington, D.C.

Subject: RE: Substituting maxillary laterals for avulsed centrals: reprise
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 23:55:25 +0100
From: "Ross Hobson" <R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
To: "Jeff Genecov" <c0018593@airmail.net>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Thanks for all your replies to this difficult situation.

However a small error occurred (I should have taken typing in high school!) The sentence beginning "Her maxillary central were previously avulsed completely..." should read "maxillary centrals", meaning both were avulsed and reimplanted, and are now failing.

I can't remebr if the patinet required extractions in the lower arch - if this is the case a neat plan is to use the lower premolars into the central sockets - you need a good delicate surgeon (get him to read Andresen's book on trauma of incisors) the success rate is as good as implants.but you need close coporeation with someone to do the RCT on the transplanted teeth then to reshape the crowns you place the molars side on we have used this with good results in a number of case following trauma and in hypodontiaross Hobson[Ross Hobson] 


Subject: RE: Agenesis mandibular 5s
Date: Tue, 11 Apr 2000 23:55:34 +0100
From: "Ross Hobson" <R.S.Hobson@ncl.ac.uk>
To: "Mark Cordato" <markc@ix.net.au>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
00 1:45 PM
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Agenesis mandibular 5s
In Newcstle on our hypodontia clinic this is a common problem
if there is no lower crowding or need for retraction of the incisors we
mainatin the E's as long as possible to keep bone - if necessary building
crown height to keep the occlusion
as and when they are lost 0 acid etch bridges work very well

if there is crowding then close the space.
ps.
class III molars are perfectly stable

Ross Hobson
 
Date: Mon, 17 Apr 2000 10:04:23 EDT
From: DrDCarter@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691 Invisalign
Message-ID: <3e.28eaf49.262c73e7@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Drew Kohl asked about the Invialign course and other questions.  Here is the
company's latest news release, which reinforces my hunch that this will
become the method of choice for GPs/"orthodentists" and dovetails exactly
with the wave of "cosmetic" dentistry.  Notice that it begins with references
to orthodontists and subtly the references change to dentists. We may be the
scientific communities first distributed beta testers testing for our future
competition. 

Dick Carter

from AOL news

Straightening Teeth Over the Internet; Thousands of Orthodontists Use Web for
First Time to Treat Patients

Major New Internet Initiative in Orthodontics

 SUNNYVALE, Calif., April 6 /PRNewswire/ -- Align Technology Inc today re-
launched invisalign.com, a website that helps orthodontists straighten teeth.
The site -- which targets both doctors and patients -- is an integral part of
the Invisalign System (TM), a new, virtually invisible way to straighten
teeth.

Align Technology launched the Invisalign System (TM) in June 1999. Since
then, the Company has certified over 30% (more than 2,600) of U.S.
orthodontists to use the System. Over 2,500 patients are now straightening
their teeth the 'wireless' way.

Doctors treating patients with Invisalign spend approximately one hour per
case on invisalign.com viewing a 3D graphical representation of their
patient's teeth via ClinCheck(TM), a movie-like software program showing
teeth moving from present position into a final, straightened state. The
doctor diagnoses and plans the case by scripting and editing the movie of the
patient' s prescribed treatment -- all via the web. This makes invisalign.com
the only "must view" web-site in orthodontics and one of the stickiest
websites in the medical world.

There are already over 1000 registered users of invisalign.com. This figure
is expected to grow rapidly as the website becomes a central means of
communication between the doctor and Align Technology and, eventually,
between the doctor and his patients.

invisalign.com is a powerful platform for bringing together the 8500
orthodontists in the US.  As a group these doctors consume $1 to $2 billion
in supplies per annum and have an aggregate income of over $2 billion, or
$250k per doctor. In addition to providing a quality community site for the
industry, Align intends to sell to orthodontists via invisalign.com
everything they need to run their practices.

Orthodontists are not the only visitors to invisalign.com. The website is
also valuable to potential patients looking for information on Invisalign;
Invisalign-certified orthodontists in their neighborhood; testimonials of pati
ents who have gone through treatment; and a customer service forum where they
can interact with customer support representatives and current patients.

Expanding to Serve All In the Dental Arena 

Orthodontists and their patients are just the beginning.  Align intends to
make invisalign.com the portal of choice for tens of thousands of dentists.
For example, the site will offer dentists and patients new versions of
ClinCheck(TM) to help them visualize treatment solutions for cosmetic dental
services.

invisalign.com is another step in Align's quest to bring 21st Century
technology (not limited to the Internet) to the practice of orthodontics.
Align has devised a multi-step system for straightening teeth without the use
of metal braces:

 1.  The doctor sends digital photographs, x-rays and an impression of the 

patient's teeth to Align via e-mail and by courier. Using this data 

Align makes the 3D movie showing the tooth movements necessary for a 

straight smile.

2.  Then, the doctor uses invisalign.com to tell Align how to treat the 

patient's teeth. This description becomes the script for the 

ClinCheck(TM) 3D movie predicting the entire course of treatment.

3.  Days later, both doctor and patient can view the movie using Align's 

unique web-based diagnostic tool (ClinCheck)(TM). This revolutionary 

software allows them to take a virtual tour inside the patient's 

mouth. The patient sees her teeth as they are now, the way they will 

be at the end of treatment and all the stages in-between.

4.  The doctor's role is to edit the movie and approve the "final cut."

The editor's remarks are entered into the website. Align then uses 

CAD/CAM technology to translate the approved "final cut" to create a 

series of customized "aligners" for his patient.

The aligners are clear, lightweight polycarbonate devices that fit over the
patient's teeth and are worn at least 20 hours per day. Unlike metal braces
the aligners may be removed for eating, brushing, flossing or even kissing.

Most importantly, the aligners are clear, plastic and disposable, like
contact lenses that straighten teeth. They are nearly impossible to see when
worn, which removes a major barrier for the millions of adults who wish their
teeth were straighter but would never consider wearing metal braces. Just as
contact lenses eliminated the need for unsightly spectacles, Invisalign
eliminates the need for a mouth full of metal.

According to Align, 50% of adults age 25-to-49 -- or 50 million adults --
"wish their teeth were straighter." Yet less than 1% opt for braces every
year. This represents an enormous opportunity for orthodontists to expand
their patient base and significantly increase their revenues.

SOURCE  Align Technology Inc.

CO:  Align Technology Inc.

ST:  California
Date: Sun, 16 Apr 2000 14:59:53 -0400
From: stuart messinger <stmessin@bellatlantic.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Moving teeth through irradiated bone
Message-ID: <38FA0DA8.C482701F@bellatlantic.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have seen a patient for consultation. He presents as a 16yr old with a
history of naso pharangeal carcinoma of the naso-palatine area diagnosed
and treated at age seven. He received large doses of radiation which has
destroyed all of the hair follicles on his head. Dentally, he has
arrested growth of all teeth at the time of the radiation. There is
little root formation on the second molars and incomplete root formation
on the bicuspids and cuspids. The maxillary centrals are flared and the
maxillary right cuspid is erupted labially and slightly blocked out.  He
has a constricted maxilla with bilateral lateral open bites.  The boy
would like his "front teeth to look better".
Does anyone know the problems with moving teeth through heavily
irradiated bone? At most I would consider aligning the anteriors.
Thanks for the input.
Stuart Messinger

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 694

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: text for front desk staff
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  3) Re:Patient Dismissal
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  4) Orthodontist in Alma Ata, Kazakhstan
        by "Jens Ostheimer" <jens.ostheimer@gmx.net>
  5) Sassouni analysis
        by "Rodrigo F. Viecilli" <ulbranet00643@ulbranet.com.br>
  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691 Invisalign
        by "Mark Cordato" <markc@ix.net.au>
  7) #691 - J Shefferman
        by "Paul D. Zuelke" <zuelke@email.msn.com>
  8) asymmetry
        by "Dr. Sumant Goel" <goel@vsnl.com>
  9) Re Text for Staff
        by "Hugh Bradley" <hughbradley@eircom.net>
 10) Orthodontist is Belfast area
        by "Hugh Bradley" <hughbradley@eircom.net>
 11) RE: Mary K Barkley and text for front office staff
        by "Mort & Gayle Speck" <morton_speck@hms.harvard.edu>
 12) Fw: text for front desk staff
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 21:41:07 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000421214107.007a6410@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"






Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information.  ESCO is moderated by Dr. Joseph
Zernik from the University of Southern California Department of Orthodontics.

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

4




Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 20:39:40 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: text for front desk staff
Message-ID: <24.3dca516.262e5a4c@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Mary,
Just a thought about training front desk personel without any ortho
experience.  Do you have a R.O.P. program in your area?  They are usually
administered through a school district and have a dental assistant program
(and usually a dental front desk part also).
If you don't, I may be able to get the manuals from our R.O.P. and send them
to you.  I don't know what the cost would be.  Let me know.
Ron Redmond
ronredmond@compuserve.com
Date: Tue, 18 Apr 2000 20:46:40 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re:Patient Dismissal
Message-ID: <99.3a31b1f.262e5bf0@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The California Orthodontic Association published a letter that can be sent to
patients informing them of your intention to dismiss them from your practice.
 Usually patients that are behind in their financials are also poor about
keeping appointments and hard on their appliances.  Your decision to
discontinue can be "lack of cooperation".   If you would like a copy of this
letter, pleae let me know.  I have been using it for years, more as a
collection letter, but my intent is clear to the patient and parents.  Very
seldom do I actually have to dismiss someone,  but it acts as a good "wake-up
call".
Ron Redmond
ronredmond@compuserve.com
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2000 19:15:49 +0200
From: "Jens Ostheimer" <jens.ostheimer@gmx.net>
To: <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: Orthodontist in Alma Ata, Kazakhstan
Message-ID: <002e01bfaa22$ee9b7a40$702536d5@kasimir>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_002B_01BFAA33.AC494440"

I am looking for an orthodontist located in the area of Alma-Ata, Kazakhstan or anywhere in Russia for the referral of a patient who is going to move there.
 
Sincerely
Jens Ostheimer
Aachen, Germany
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2000 15:27:05 -0300
From: "Rodrigo F. Viecilli" <ulbranet00643@ulbranet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Sassouni analysis
Message-ID: <LPBBJMLGGOCKOJHHALLECECMCJAA.ulbranet00643@ulbranet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

        Why the criteria of obtaining the "O"  center in this analysis differs from
some books to the original articles by Dr. Viken Sassouni? Are there any
explanations for the changes that are made? What principles for marking this
point are the orthodontists from USA using nowadays? And why?



Rodrigo F. Viecilli
UFRGS- Brazil



Date: Thu, 20 Apr 2000 07:32:03 +1000
From: "Mark Cordato" <markc@ix.net.au>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691 Invisalign
Message-ID: <200004192132.HAA28728@mail.ix.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Dear Dick

On 17 Apr 00, at 10:04, DrDCarter@aol.com wrote:

> Drew Kohl asked about the Invialign course and other questions.  Here
> is the company's latest news release, which reinforces my hunch that
> this will become the method of choice for GPs/"orthodentists" and
> dovetails exactly with the wave of "cosmetic" dentistry.  Notice that
> it begins with references to orthodontists and subtly the references
> change to dentists. We may be the scientific communities first
> distributed beta testers testing for our future competition. 
>
> Dick Carter
>

The worm will probably turn at least once more. When they have
recruited the dentists to do the ortho and the company needs more
profit they may then recruit dental technicians and then DIY at home
kits. I can see a DIY kit really endearing itself to the dentists,
just like they may plan to do to orthodontists first.

Thankfully, like many technology advances on the web, others have
access to similar materials (for suckdowns) and others will see an
opportunity to make a profit and this will introduce its own
competition.

Invisalign looks interesting from my view in Australia but again from
this distance it looks like by using them you just may be helping to
develop yourself out of some work.

Cheers,
Mark Cordato
Bathurst
markc@ix.net.au
Date: Wed, 19 Apr 2000 14:03:55 -0700
From: "Paul D. Zuelke" <zuelke@email.msn.com>
To: "ESCO" <Orthod-L@USC.edu>
Subject: #691 - J Shefferman
Message-ID: <000a01bfaa42$c7972c80$086fa8c0@potlnd1.or.home.com>
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Regarding the adult patient who decided to not honor his contract.. 
 
You have every right to terminate treatment of this case based on the decision of the financially responsible party to abrogate his contract without cause.
 
There is a fundamental question to ask first.  Is the patient is in equal or better clinical condition today than he was when you started treatment?
 
If the answer is "yes" and the patient is clinically (excessive emergencies, abysmal home care), or administratively (excessive missed appointments), or socially (a real jerk, loud, verbally abusive/demanding), or financially (non-payment) uncooperative, you may terminate treatment.
 
There are a couple of caveats.  You must have:
 
  • Evidence that you have expended adequate effort to resolve the problem, and have failed to do so.
  • Evidence that you have given the patient/responsible party adequate written notice of your intentions.
 
My recommendation to a client would be to, after adequate notice, remove this patient from the practice.  You have a right to quality of life within your practice and, subject to the answer to that fundamental question I mentioned, you have no legal, moral, or ethical obligation to continue to treat a patient who actively damages the quality of life within your practice.
 
An attorney may well give you the opposite advice.  Remember that an attorney can get in no trouble and has no risk at all in telling you to "play it safe" and finish the case.  After all, it is not his money being lost nor is it his quality of life that is suffering.  If, in fact, you do hear opposite advice from your attorney, ask him to quote the specific statute or case law upon which his advice is based.  You will likely find that the advice is based on personal opinion and not statute or case law.  To my knowledge there has never been a single case where a doctor was ruled against when the doctor/practice terminated a patient after fulfilling those two caveats.
 
Respectfully -
 
Paul D. Zuelke
zuelke@msn.com
 
Date: Thu, 20 Apr 2000 08:17:42 +0530
From: "Dr. Sumant Goel" <goel@vsnl.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: asymmetry
Message-ID: <00c301bfaa72$d29161c0$5ac1d4d2@goel>
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Dear Group,

In continuation of discussion of dealing with subdivision cases, asymmetries
are hard to dealwith. Especially in good many cases if the mandible is weak
on one side -it also results in maxilla being smaller on the same side
because of the reduces functional forces of the affected side. In such
situation how does one resort to any funcational appliance -as it will
impede maxillary growth as well.

We have a 10 year old female patient. Due to ankylosis she underwent
condylectomy on the left side 3 months ago. Occlusion (Overjet, overbite and
midline) is perfect at this time but during mouth opening the mandible is
deviating significantly to the leftside. She is likely to develop asymmetry?
I invite opinions on what are the options available to treat this girl - to
give the best possible outcome. What happens if she is left untreated.



Dr. Sumant Goel, M.D.S.
Prof. Of orthodontics
Visit my web  http://www.HealthMantra.com



Date: Thu, 20 Apr 2000 13:05:50 +0100
From: "Hugh Bradley" <hughbradley@eircom.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re Text for Staff
Message-ID: <DOEHIBNLIAALDACDKGDGOEHDCAAA.hughbradley@eircom.net>
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I would highly recommend "The Book" by Dean Bellavia.
This covers very comprehensively all office procedures and includes a
section on dental anatomy etc.
Not a cheap book but one I have found very useful over the past 10 years.

It is available direct from his company :Bio-engineering Co., Buffalo, New
York.
This is the best address I have got unfortunately.

If anyone has a better contact address perhaps they might post it here.


Hugh Bradley
?-)

hughbradley@eircom.net
22 Park St., Dundalk, Ireland

Date: Thu, 20 Apr 2000 13:05:51 +0100
From: "Hugh Bradley" <hughbradley@eircom.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Orthodontist is Belfast area
Message-ID: <DOEHIBNLIAALDACDKGDGAEHECAAA.hughbradley@eircom.net>
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I would recommend that you would refer your patient to Consultant
orthodontist in the Belfast Dental School

Dr Donald Burden
Orthodontic Dept
School of Dentistry
Royal Victoria Hospital
Grosvenor Rd
Belfast


Hugh Bradley
?-)

hughbradley@eircom.net

-----Original Message-----
From: owner-orthod-l@usc.edu [mailto:owner-orthod-l@usc.edu]On Behalf Of
orthod-l@usc.edu
Sent: Wednesday, April 19, 2000 10:34 AM
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 693


                            ORTHOD-L Digest 693

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu> (by way of Joseph Zernik
<orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>)
  2) Re: text for front desk staff
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  3) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  4) Orthodontist in Belfast area
        by "Gerald Zeit" <g.zeit@utoronto.ca>
  5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691
        by YURFEST@aol.com
  7) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 692
        by Orthodas@aol.com
  8) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 692
        by Larry Jerrold <jerr2@idt.net>
  9) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 691 Invisalign
        by DrDCarter@aol.com
 10) Moving teeth through irradiated bone
        by stuart messinger <stmessin@bellatlantic.net>

Date: Thu, 20 Apr 2000 20:16:31 -0400
From: "Mort & Gayle Speck" <morton_speck@hms.harvard.edu>
To: Ortho Study Club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: Mary K Barkley and text for front office staff
Message-ID: <38FAFB7C@webmail.med.harvard.edu>
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Dear Mary and Similarly Interested Colleagues-

Don't reinvent the wheel.  An excellent orthodontic text and workbook were
developed by Dean Bellavia who runs (ran?) the Bio-Engineering Co. out of
Buffalo, NY, an orthodontic consulting co.  I could not find him listed in the
ATT directories. Perhaps one of you can supply his phone/adddress.

Some years ago Dean came out with "THE BOOK" and some of you may have it. It
was a detailed treatise on the nuts and bolts of running an orthodontic
practice. I would recommend it for those of you who don't want to afford a
consultant at this time, but have aspirations to be super organized. Bellavia
and "attention to detail" are synonymous.  No financial interest---just
admiration.
 
Hope this is helpful.

Mort Speck

Please reply to: <mgs@hms.harvard.edu>   (Mort & Gayle Speck)

Date: Fri, 21 Apr 2000 10:45:59 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Fw: text for front desk staff
Message-ID: <003f01bfaba0$50147be0$b7d14cd8@pavilion>
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Mary,

GAC has a CD-rom to educate staff.

Roy King
ORTHOD-L Digest 695 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) truth in advertising by pm.thomas@gte.net 3) Virtual Journal of Orthodontics 3.2 by Gabriele Floria 4) RE: Kevin Koller and Protraction Issues by "Mort & Gayle Speck" 5) Invisalign by Barry Raphael 6) Patient Dismissal by atindall 7) correction by "Paul M Thomas" 8) Text of Dismissal Letter by WRed852509@cs.com 9) Complete text of dismissal letter by WRed852509@cs.com Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2000 20:03:56 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000424200356.007cac90@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 1 Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 09:05:57 -0400 From: pm.thomas@gte.net To: "ESCO" Subject: truth in advertising Message-ID: <004001bfac5b$7feb6d40$941e1918@nc.rr.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Colleagues and interested parties I am posting this information in this forum to shed some light on some misleading information which was inappropriately disseminated by Gunther Blaseio, the owner/CEO of Quick Ceph Software. His website and a recent nationwide mailing contain images illustrating orthognathic surgery treatment simulations on a series of patients having a variety of skeletal malocclusions. The more popular simulation software programs have been used in "auto treat" mode, meaning that no touch-up was done on any of the images. An actual postoperative outcome is also shown for comparison. I prepared these simulations with the help of Dr. Myron Tucker and Dr. Arlet Dunsworth over two years ago. They were part of a pilot study in preparation for a thesis project currently underway at the University of North Carolina. I showed the results to each of the vendors at the AAO meeting in San Diego and offered to send copies to those interested. Dr. Blaseio asked that I send him a CD with the images so that he could use them in a lecture he was giving last summer. I was flabbergasted to find that he had posted this material on his website without the permission of the authors or releases from the patients whose faces are being splashed all over the internet. I was even more shocked to learn that he has included this material in a nationwide mailing of a brochure promoting his products. Again, no permission, no releases. This was clearly not my intent in giving him access to these images. I would like to set the record straight. I realize there may be a limited readership of this list, but word can travel and it appears there is an international audience. [1] These images were prepared with software versions which are several years old, yet Dr. Blaseio implies they are current. This does a disservice to the other vendors to have made multiple improvements in image simulation since this pilot study was done. [2] Dr. Blaseo states that I clearly demonstrated the superiority of Quick Ceph Image Pro at a CE course held at UNC in April 1999. http://www.quickceph.com/qc2000_index.html I made no such statement. I simply displayed the images, explained how they were generated and allowed the audience to draw their own conclusions. I *did* say that Quick Ceph and DF Plus seem to manage patients having vertical changes (open bite and deep bite corrections) better than the other products. All products seem to perform reasonably well on sagittal movements. [3] I in no way endorse Quick Ceph Software. In fact I don't use it on a daily basis. I have tried to forge a good working relationship with all vendors in completing this pilot study and starting the larger research project, and it is an injustice to them that this material has been used in a misleading manner for self-promotion and advertising. It is clear that Dr. Blaseio likes to play by the rules....as long as he is the one who makes them. Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS Adjunct Associate Professor Departments of Orthodontics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery University of North Carolina Dental School Manning Drive Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 18:48:54 +0200 From: Gabriele Floria To: drfloria@tin.it Subject: Virtual Journal of Orthodontics 3.2 Message-ID: <3.0.32.20000422184601.0132c8a4@mail.dada.it> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Virtual Journal of Orthodontics http://vjco.it Table of Contents for Issue 3.2 April 2000 http://vjco.it/vjo032.htm -------------------------------------------------------------- ORIGINAL ARTICLES - Skeletal Distraction for Mandibular Lengthening with a Completely Intraoral Toothborn Distractor Yan Razdolsky D.D.S. Buffalo Grove, IL Children's Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, and Highland Park Hospital, Chicago, IL USA http://vjco.it/032/distren.htm (english version) http://vjco.it/032/distres.htm (spanish version) http://vjco.it/032/distrit.htm (italian version) PROSTHETIC REHABILITATION FOR PATIENTS WITH LABIOPALATOSCHISIS : traditional and new aproach R.Branchi MD DDS Assistant Research Professor Department of Prosthodontics Università degli Studi di Firenze Italy http://vjco.it/032/lpsen.htm (english vers.) http://vjco.it/032/lpses.htm (spanish vers.) http://vjco.it/032/lpsit.htm (italian vers.) INDIRECT BONDING a new improved adhesive Alberto R. Mazzocchi MD DDS Bergamo Italy http://vjco.it/032/sondin.htm (english vers.) http://vjco.it/032/sondes.htm (spanish vers.) http://vjco.it/032/sondit.htm (italian vers.) Orthodontic treatment conceptions (fourth part) (According to McLaughlin-Bennett-Trevisi) Arturo Fortini MD DDS Massimo Lupoli MD DDS http://vjco.it/032/Mbt04it.htm (italian version) (english and spanish version under conctructions) Le Disfunzioni del Sistema Cranio-Cervico-Mandibolare Umberto Montecorboli MD, DDS http://vjco.it/032/dccm4.htm (italian version) (english and spanish version under conctructions) READER’S SERVICES Editorial by Alberto Mazzocchi VJO associate editor http://vjco.it/032/ed032.htm (english vers.) http://vjco.it/032/ed032s.htm (spanish version) http://vjco.it/032/ed032t.htm (italian version) Orthodontic Meeting Database http://vjco.it/search.htm Orthodontic Department in the World http://www.vjco.it/orthodep.htm Opportunities http://www.vjco.it/inserzi.htm Keywords Search Engine http://vjco.it Apologies for cross-posting and mistakes Dr. Gabriele Floria DDS editor@vjco.it Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 22:22:51 -0400 From: "Mort & Gayle Speck" To: Ortho Study Club Subject: RE: Kevin Koller and Protraction Issues Message-ID: <38FBF90F@webmail.med.harvard.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit The following is a dupe of what I thought I sent a short time ago when protraction was a current topic. Perhaps it got lost in cyber space, or I possibly missed it. Let's try it again! Greetings All- Though I haven't been much of a contributor as of late, I certainly have enjoyed the postings. Being retired, with the exception of some limited teaching, should afford me a lot of free time. However, being somewhat inefficient, and without the assistance of my organized staff to keep me on track, I find myself still playing catch-up! A few preliminary remarks: It it is all well and good to "leave orthodontics to the orthodontist and prosthetics etc.", but there are also socioeconomic issues to be considered, perhaps(?) more in other countries than ours. There are some patients whom you know will never be candidates for the ideal prosthetic restoration, and for whom protraction of posterior teeth in the face of congenitally missing premolars would be providing the best service, taking into consideration the skeletal pattern, the size of the teeth etc. We should all be very concerned about over-retracting the lower anterior teeth when protracting lower molars. Obviously, the key to success is to enhance your anterior anchorage, reduce your posterior resistance, and very important, to reduce your force levels. Bonding a lingual wire to every tooth from first premolar to first premolar goes a long way to fulfilling the first objective and I strongly recommend it for "long distance" protraction. Those of you who have the advantage of Tip-Edge mechanics can fill the brackets with a rectangular wire and add the potent resistance of root uprighting springs. I have found that by placing the wire in the relatively larger .036 molar double tube, there is a reduction in the amount of force necessary to protract the molar. Although some tipping may occur,once the space is closed, this is resolved by switching to the edgewise tube and subsequently leveling. (Obviously none of us would attempt to protract the first and second molar concomitantly, right?) I am aware that edgewise brackets now have the capability of receiving uprighting springs, (thanks, Dr. Begg) but I feel the problem of increased posterior resistance is created with a full slotted wire in the edgewise tube necessitating increased forces for protraction which can result in undesirable anterior over-retraction. Tony Gianelli certainly has the right idea with his Bidimensional Technique and I recommend a review of his articles for you edgewise mavens. Additionally, anterior anchorage can also be enhanced by placing an off-center bend, a la Mulligan, just distal to the first bicuspid in those instances where the second bicuspid is congenitally absent or has been extracted. A related issue I would like to mention is the integrity of the contact point between the 1st bicuspid and the molar in second bicuspid (minimal anchorage) extraction cases, particularly in adults, and also in those instances where the molar has been protracted a long distance when the 2nd bicuspid is congenitally absent. Frequently, the contact is loose, or reopens just enough to distress our periodontal colleagues. My clinical impression is that bonding a buccal wire between the molar and first bicuspid for 6 months or more after the space has been tightly closed allows the tissues to reorganize and mature and can minimize this problem. But even then there is no guarantee for a permanently tight contact. One last issue is the minimal occlusal contact area of the maxillary second molars when only lower second bicuspids are missing or extracted and the spaces closed. Your speculation relative to this occlusion is as good as mine. Perhaps some of may have some long term data. Sorry to be so long winded, but as you can see there are many considerations regarding this problem. We would all welcome additional insight into this problem. Regards to all, Mort Speck Please reply to: (Mort & Gayle Speck) Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 04:04:23 -0400 From: Barry Raphael To: ESCO Subject: Invisalign Message-ID: <3902AE87.4959CBB7@concentric.net> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Invisalign Update Gentlemen and women, before you bristle more about this oncoming phase in our long and illustrious history, and before you let the paranoia set in, let me speak to the voice of reason. Remember, this technique is only a tool for our trade. Our trade is healthy occlusion and esthetics, not braces. Our expertise is in diagnosis and treatment planning far more than in placing appliances. As such, I believe that Invisalign, and whatever variations that follow, will not only open new markets for us directly, but will significantly broaden the demand for our more "traditional" services. Also, since the advent of Bionators, straightwire appliances and nickel titanium wire have not made orthodontics so easy that any GP can do it, neither will Invisalign spell our demise even if GP or home kits are offered.. While there may be lots that this appliance can do, there will be much it can't do. Dx and TxPlanning will be just as tricky, with as many shades of gray, as there are with any appliance. For instance, this appliance, so far anyway, is strictly INTRAARCH mechanics. I will not be surprised if we see anchorage effects create beautiful but mismatched arches since real anchorage vectors are not predicted in the Clincheck diagnostic process. Just like with fixed appliances, I think you should feel comfortable educating and encouraging your GP's to get involved (when the time comes), for after the first few cases that don't turn out, you'll still have a great source of referral. So far, I have four cases in progress with the fourth being my own self (just three days into a 20 step treatment), and two more in the lab. So far, I have felt totally in control of the treatment planning process and the appliances have been impeccably fabricated. I have also had to reject some cases from consideration - a choice only an orthodontist could make. So, if any of you are feeling too defensive to get involved, I suggest you let your guard down. There is great potential here for something that you would be foolish not to have in your bag of tricks. BTW. Absolutely no financial interest. Barry Raphael Clifton, NJ Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 21:49:18 +0930 From: atindall To: Ortho Study Club Subject: Patient Dismissal Message-ID: <3902EA45.8401FD3@dove.net.au> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Regarding patient dismissal. What is the opinion of the group regarding children. The difference is of course that they do not have the contract with you as it is (usually) a parent who is paying for treatment. Unfortunately it is not the child's fault that the parent does not honour the contract. Andrew Tindall Adelaide South Australia atindall@dove.net.au Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 09:19:45 -0400 From: "Paul M Thomas" To: "ESCO" Subject: correction Message-ID: <003f01bfad26$989c3600$2f89f7a5@laptop> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Colleagues, I would like to make a correction in my message of yesterday. Dr. Tucker informed me that Gunther Blaseio did, in fact, ask him for permission to use the Quick Ceph simulations and that his patients had given permission for publication of their likenesses. Other than that, my statements stand. I have never been personally asked regarding use of the other simulations and I still feel there are distortions and omissions in Dr. Blaseio's use of the material. Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS Adjunct Associate Professor Departments of Orthodontics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery University of North Carolina Dental School Manning Drive Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2000 02:00:13 EDT From: WRed852509@cs.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Text of Dismissal Letter Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hi All, There were so many requests for the text of the California Association of Orthodontists dismissal letter that I thought I should present this to the entire ESCO. The text represents a letter to the patient, but can be adapted for the responsible party. In view of the continuing lack of cooperation on your part, I am hereby advising you that I shall terminate your treatment thirty days from the date of this letter. In my opinion, you can benefit from continued orthodontic care and I urge you to seek the services of another orthodontist. If you decide not to have another orthodontist take over your treatment within the next four weeks, I recommend that you contact my office to have the appliances removed since there may be health problems from wearing appliances without periodic maintenance and adjustment. these potential problems include decalcification of teeth, increased risk of cavities and the possibility of injury to soft tissues of the mouth from loose or broken appliances. This should be sent by certified mail with a return-receipt-requested. Save the receipt in the patient's file, or if the letter is returned unopened or not deliverable, save the letter in the file. My experience has been that most patients or parents respond to this letter in a positive way. That is, they are more likely to clear up their account and proceed with treatment than go elsewhere. If the patient returns after a lengthy period (6 months) and wants to continue treatment, then they are informed of the necessity of new treatment records with a new diagnosis, treatment plan and fee. I have found this to be a reasonable way to prevent possible problems in the future. I hope this helps to your patient management a little easier. See you all in Chicago. Ron Redmond DDS Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2000 19:45:02 EDT From: WRed852509@cs.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Complete text of dismissal letter Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Sorry I left off the last paragraph. Here is the complete text: In view of the continuing lack of cooperation on your part, I am hereby advising you that I shall terminate your treatment thirty days from the date of this letter. In my opinion, you can benefit from continued orthodontic care and I urge you to seek the services of another orthodontist. If you decide not to have another orthodontist take over your treatment within the next four weeks, I recommend that you contact my office to have the appliances removed since there may be health problems from wearing appliances without periodic maintenance and adjustment. these potential problems include decalcification of teeth, increased risk of cavities and the possibility of injury to soft tissues of the mouth from loose or broken appliances. Due to your lack of cooperation, broken appointments and failure to continue a prescribed treatment plan, I do not accept any responsibility for your orthodontic treatment. ORTHOD-L Digest 696 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Invisalign System by Drnickz11@aol.com 3) quick cure paste by g russell frankel 4) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 695 by Larry Jerrold 5) Re: Patient Dismissal by Dave Birks Date: Mon, 01 May 2000 12:32:55 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000501123255.007aabb0@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 2 Date: Tue, 25 Apr 2000 09:56:58 EDT From: Drnickz11@aol.com To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: Invisalign System Message-ID: <9.4a6209d.2636fe2a@aol.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I have spoken to several orthodontists who have used this system, and I find that the appliance is no more than a glorified Essix retainer. Likewise, it is very costly, and demands full cooperation from the patient. Furthermore, just as any removeable appliance, it only produces a tipping movement of the teeth, rather than a bodily movement. So if you want to save alot of money for yourself as the orthodontist, and save the patient alot of cash, a modified Essix retainer can easily produce equal results with minimal labwork. I can prove that. So anyone who thinks that this new company isn't a total marketing gimmick and isn't going to go after orthodontists' pockets is totally mistaken. By the way, no financial interest in Raintree-Essix here. Nick Zafiropoulos Mashpee Orthodontics Mashpee, MA Date: Tue, 25 Apr 2000 20:38:40 -0400 From: g russell frankel To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: quick cure paste Message-ID: <39063A90.F6BD7F53@cinci.rr.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit in case someone might be interested, i have been trying quick cure bonding paste from reliance and have been pleasantly impressed. i have been contemplating the laser at its inflated price. this stuff really works at 10 seconds/ bracket. it sets quite hard (flash), and i even put an elastic on a buccal tube and compressed coil springs. i went 20 seconds for molars. didn't get the 6 second probe for $279 because they didn't make it to fit my light. mine works fine, andit does reduce time. use it mainly on uppers, with fuji on lowers because of wetness. no financial interest, but it's worth a try. g russell frankel - cincinnati Date: Thu, 27 Apr 2000 08:53:09 -0400 From: Larry Jerrold To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 695 Message-ID: <39083834.42CB05C4@idt.net> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Andreww Tindall It doesn't matter, the parent contracts on behalf of the child. Larry Jerrold orthod-l@usc.edu wrote: > ORTHOD-L Digest 695 > > Topics covered in this issue include: > > 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics > by Joseph Zernik > 2) truth in advertising > by pm.thomas@gte.net > 3) Virtual Journal of Orthodontics 3.2 > by Gabriele Floria > 4) RE: Kevin Koller and Protraction Issues > by "Mort & Gayle Speck" > 5) Invisalign > by Barry Raphael > 6) Patient Dismissal > by atindall > 7) correction > by "Paul M Thomas" > 8) Text of Dismissal Letter > by WRed852509@cs.com > 9) Complete text of dismissal letter > by WRed852509@cs.com > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics > Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2000 20:03:56 -0700 > From: Joseph Zernik > To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu > > Dear Colleague: > > The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for > exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for > distribution of professional information. > > * What information can you get on ESCO? > > * How to subscribe to ESCO? > > * How to change your address? > > * How to post messages on ESCO? > > For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: > http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm > > Enjoy! > > Sincerely, > > Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. > Professor, Department of Orthodontics > University of Southern California > http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ > > 1 > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: truth in advertising > Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 09:05:57 -0400 > From: pm.thomas@gte.net > To: "ESCO" > > Colleagues and interested parties > > I am posting this information in this forum to shed some light on some > misleading information which was inappropriately disseminated by Gunther > Blaseio, the owner/CEO of Quick Ceph Software. His website and a recent > nationwide mailing contain images illustrating orthognathic surgery > treatment simulations on a series of patients having a variety of skeletal > malocclusions. The more popular simulation software programs have been used > in "auto treat" mode, meaning that no touch-up was done on any of the > images. An actual postoperative outcome is also shown for comparison. I > prepared these simulations with the help of Dr. Myron Tucker and Dr. Arlet > Dunsworth over two years ago. They were part of a pilot study in > preparation for a thesis project currently underway at the University of > North Carolina. I showed the results to each of the vendors at the AAO > meeting in San Diego and offered to send copies to those interested. Dr. > Blaseio asked that I send him a CD with the images so that he could use them > in a lecture he was giving last summer. I was flabbergasted to find that he > had posted this material on his website without the permission of the > authors or releases from the patients whose faces are being splashed all > over the internet. I was even more shocked to learn that he has included > this material in a nationwide mailing of a brochure promoting his products. > Again, no permission, no releases. This was clearly not my intent in giving > him access to these images. > > I would like to set the record straight. I realize there may be a limited > readership of this list, but word can travel and it appears there is an > international audience. > > [1] These images were prepared with software versions which are several > years old, yet Dr. Blaseio implies they are current. This does a disservice > to the other vendors to have made multiple improvements in image simulation > since this pilot study was done. > > [2] Dr. Blaseo states that I clearly demonstrated the superiority of Quick > Ceph Image Pro at a CE course held at UNC in April 1999. > http://www.quickceph.com/qc2000_index.html I made no such statement. I > simply displayed the images, explained how they were generated and allowed > the audience to draw their own conclusions. I *did* say that Quick Ceph and > DF Plus seem to manage patients having vertical changes (open bite and deep > bite corrections) better than the other products. All products seem to > perform reasonably well on sagittal movements. > > [3] I in no way endorse Quick Ceph Software. In fact I don't use it on a > daily basis. I have tried to forge a good working relationship with all > vendors in completing this pilot study and starting the larger research > project, and it is an injustice to them that this material has been used in > a misleading manner for self-promotion and advertising. It is clear that > Dr. Blaseio likes to play by the rules....as long as he is the one who makes > them. > > Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS > Adjunct Associate Professor > Departments of Orthodontics and > Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery > University of North Carolina Dental School > Manning Drive > Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: Virtual Journal of Orthodontics 3.2 > Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 18:48:54 +0200 > From: Gabriele Floria > To: drfloria@tin.it > > Virtual Journal of Orthodontics http://vjco.it > > Table of Contents for Issue 3.2 April 2000 > http://vjco.it/vjo032.htm > -------------------------------------------------------------- > ORIGINAL ARTICLES > > - Skeletal Distraction for Mandibular Lengthening with a Completely > Intraoral Toothborn Distractor > Yan Razdolsky D.D.S. > Buffalo Grove, IL Children's Memorial Hospital, Northwestern University, > and Highland Park Hospital, Chicago, IL USA > http://vjco.it/032/distren.htm (english version) > http://vjco.it/032/distres.htm (spanish version) > http://vjco.it/032/distrit.htm (italian version) > > PROSTHETIC REHABILITATION FOR PATIENTS > WITH LABIOPALATOSCHISIS : traditional and new > aproach > R.Branchi MD DDS > Assistant Research Professor > Department of Prosthodontics > Università degli Studi di Firenze Italy > http://vjco.it/032/lpsen.htm (english vers.) > http://vjco.it/032/lpses.htm (spanish vers.) > http://vjco.it/032/lpsit.htm (italian vers.) > > INDIRECT BONDING a new improved adhesive > Alberto R. Mazzocchi MD DDS > Bergamo Italy > http://vjco.it/032/sondin.htm (english vers.) > http://vjco.it/032/sondes.htm (spanish vers.) > http://vjco.it/032/sondit.htm (italian vers.) > > Orthodontic treatment conceptions (fourth part) > (According to McLaughlin-Bennett-Trevisi) > Arturo Fortini MD DDS > Massimo Lupoli MD DDS > http://vjco.it/032/Mbt04it.htm (italian version) > (english and spanish version under conctructions) > > Le Disfunzioni del Sistema Cranio-Cervico-Mandibolare > Umberto Montecorboli MD, DDS > http://vjco.it/032/dccm4.htm (italian version) > (english and spanish version under conctructions) > > READER’S SERVICES > > Editorial > by Alberto Mazzocchi VJO associate editor > http://vjco.it/032/ed032.htm (english vers.) > http://vjco.it/032/ed032s.htm (spanish version) > http://vjco.it/032/ed032t.htm (italian version) > > Orthodontic Meeting Database > http://vjco.it/search.htm > > Orthodontic Department in the World > http://www.vjco.it/orthodep.htm > > Opportunities > http://www.vjco.it/inserzi.htm > > Keywords Search Engine > http://vjco.it > > Apologies for cross-posting and mistakes > Dr. Gabriele Floria DDS > editor@vjco.it > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: RE: Kevin Koller and Protraction Issues > Date: Sat, 22 Apr 2000 22:22:51 -0400 > From: "Mort & Gayle Speck" > To: Ortho Study Club > > The following is a dupe of what I thought I sent a short time ago when > protraction was a current topic. Perhaps it got lost in cyber space, or I > possibly missed it. Let's try it again! > > Greetings All- > > Though I haven't been much of a contributor as of late, I certainly have > enjoyed the postings. Being retired, with the exception of some limited > teaching, should afford me a lot of free time. However, being somewhat > inefficient, and without the assistance of my organized staff to keep me on > track, I find myself still playing catch-up! > > A few preliminary remarks: > It it is all well and good to "leave orthodontics to the orthodontist and > prosthetics etc.", but there are also socioeconomic issues to be considered, > perhaps(?) more in other countries than ours. There are some patients whom you > know will never be candidates for the ideal prosthetic restoration, and for > whom protraction of posterior teeth in the face of congenitally missing > premolars would be providing the best service, taking into consideration the > skeletal pattern, the size of the teeth etc. > > We should all be very concerned about over-retracting the lower anterior teeth > when protracting lower molars. Obviously, the key to success is to enhance > your anterior anchorage, reduce your posterior resistance, and very important, > to reduce your force levels. Bonding a lingual wire to every tooth from first > premolar to first premolar goes a long way to fulfilling the first objective > and I strongly recommend it for "long distance" protraction. Those of you who > have the advantage of Tip-Edge mechanics can fill the brackets with a > rectangular wire and add the potent resistance of root uprighting springs. I > have found that by placing the wire in the relatively larger .036 molar double > tube, there is a reduction in the amount of force necessary to protract the > molar. Although some tipping may occur,once the space is closed, this is > resolved by switching to the edgewise tube and subsequently leveling. > (Obviously none of us would attempt to protract the first and second molar > concomitantly, right?) I am aware that edgewise brackets now have the > capability of receiving uprighting springs, (thanks, Dr. Begg) but I feel the > problem of increased posterior resistance is created with a full slotted wire > in the edgewise tube necessitating increased forces for protraction which can > result in undesirable anterior over-retraction. Tony Gianelli certainly has > the right idea with his Bidimensional Technique and I recommend a review of > his articles for you edgewise mavens. Additionally, anterior anchorage can > also be enhanced by placing an off-center bend, a la Mulligan, just distal to > the first bicuspid in those instances where the second bicuspid is > congenitally absent or has been extracted. > > A related issue I would like to mention is the integrity of the contact point > between the 1st bicuspid and the molar in second bicuspid (minimal anchorage) > extraction cases, particularly in adults, and also in those instances where > the molar has been protracted a long distance when the 2nd bicuspid is > congenitally absent. Frequently, the contact is loose, or reopens just enough > to distress our periodontal colleagues. My clinical impression is that bonding > a buccal wire between the molar and first bicuspid for 6 months or more after > the space has been tightly closed allows the tissues to reorganize and mature > and can minimize this problem. But even then there is no guarantee for a > permanently tight contact. > > One last issue is the minimal occlusal contact area of the maxillary second > molars when only lower second bicuspids are missing or extracted and the > spaces closed. Your speculation relative to this occlusion is as good as mine. > Perhaps some of may have some long term data. > > Sorry to be so long winded, but as you can see there are many considerations > regarding this problem. We would all welcome additional insight into this > problem. > > Regards to all, > > Mort Speck > > Please reply to: (Mort & Gayle Speck) > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: Invisalign > Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 04:04:23 -0400 > From: Barry Raphael > To: ESCO > > Invisalign Update > > Gentlemen and women, before you bristle more about this oncoming phase > in our long and illustrious history, and before you let the paranoia set > in, let me speak to the voice of reason. > > Remember, this technique is only a tool for our trade. Our trade is > healthy occlusion and esthetics, not braces. Our expertise is in > diagnosis and treatment planning far more than in placing appliances. > > As such, I believe that Invisalign, and whatever variations that follow, > will not only open new markets for us directly, but will significantly > broaden the demand for our more "traditional" services. Also, since the > advent of Bionators, straightwire appliances and nickel titanium wire > have not made orthodontics so easy that any GP can do it, neither will > Invisalign spell our demise even if GP or home kits are offered.. > > While there may be lots that this appliance can do, there will be much > it can't do. Dx and TxPlanning will be just as tricky, with as many > shades of gray, as there are with any appliance. > > For instance, this appliance, so far anyway, is strictly INTRAARCH > mechanics. I will not be surprised if we see anchorage effects create > beautiful but mismatched arches since real anchorage vectors are not > predicted in the Clincheck diagnostic process. > > Just like with fixed appliances, I think you should feel comfortable > educating and encouraging your GP's to get involved (when the time > comes), for after the first few cases that don't turn out, you'll still > have a great source of referral. > > So far, I have four cases in progress with the fourth being my own self > (just three days into a 20 step treatment), and two more in the lab. So > far, I have felt totally in control of the treatment planning process > and the appliances have been impeccably fabricated. I have also had to > reject some cases from consideration - a choice only an orthodontist > could make. > > So, if any of you are feeling too defensive to get involved, I suggest > you let your guard down. There is great potential here for something > that you would be foolish not to have in your bag of tricks. > > BTW. Absolutely no financial interest. > > Barry Raphael > Clifton, NJ > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: Patient Dismissal > Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 21:49:18 +0930 > From: atindall > To: Ortho Study Club > > Regarding patient dismissal. > What is the opinion of the group regarding children. The difference is > of course that they do not have the contract with you as it is (usually) > a parent who is paying for treatment. Unfortunately it is not the > child's fault that the parent does not honour the contract. > > Andrew Tindall > Adelaide > South Australia > atindall@dove.net.au > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: correction > Date: Sun, 23 Apr 2000 09:19:45 -0400 > From: "Paul M Thomas" > To: "ESCO" > > Colleagues, > > I would like to make a correction in my message of yesterday. Dr. Tucker > informed me that Gunther Blaseio did, in fact, ask him for permission to use > the Quick Ceph simulations and that his patients had given permission for > publication of their likenesses. Other than that, my statements stand. I > have never been personally asked regarding use of the other simulations and > I still feel there are distortions and omissions in Dr. Blaseio's use of the > material. > > Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS > Adjunct Associate Professor > Departments of Orthodontics and > Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery > University of North Carolina Dental School > Manning Drive > Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: Text of Dismissal Letter > Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2000 02:00:13 EDT > From: WRed852509@cs.com > To: orthod-l@usc.edu > > Hi All, > There were so many requests for the text of the California Association of > Orthodontists dismissal letter that I thought I should present this to the > entire ESCO. The text represents a letter to the patient, but can be adapted > for the responsible party. > > In view of the continuing lack of cooperation on your part, I am hereby > advising you that I shall terminate your treatment thirty days from the > date of this letter. In my opinion, you can benefit from continued > orthodontic care and I urge you to seek the services of another > orthodontist. > > If you decide not to have another orthodontist take over your treatment > within the next four weeks, I recommend that you contact my office to have > the appliances removed since there may be health problems from wearing > appliances without periodic maintenance and adjustment. these potential > problems include decalcification of teeth, increased risk of cavities and > the possibility of injury to soft tissues of the mouth from loose or broken > appliances. > > This should be sent by certified mail with a return-receipt-requested. Save > the receipt in the patient's file, or if the letter is returned unopened or > not deliverable, save the letter in the file. My experience has been that > most patients or parents respond to this letter in a positive way. That is, > they are more likely to clear up their account and proceed with treatment > than go elsewhere. If the patient returns after a lengthy period (6 months) > and wants to continue treatment, then they are informed of the necessity of > new treatment records with a new diagnosis, treatment plan and fee. I have > found this to be a reasonable way to prevent possible problems in the future. > > > I hope this helps to your patient management a little easier. See you all in > Chicago. > > Ron Redmond DDS > > > > ------------------------------------------------------------------------ > > Subject: Complete text of dismissal letter > Date: Mon, 24 Apr 2000 19:45:02 EDT > From: WRed852509@cs.com > To: orthod-l@usc.edu > > Sorry I left off the last paragraph. Here is the complete text: > > In view of the continuing lack of cooperation on your part, I am hereby > advising you that I shall terminate your treatment thirty days from the > date of this letter. In my opinion, you can benefit from continued > orthodontic care and I urge you to seek the services of another orthodontist. > > If you decide not to have another orthodontist take over your treatment > within the next four weeks, I recommend that you contact my office to have > the appliances removed since there may be health problems from wearing > appliances without periodic maintenance and adjustment. these potential > problems include decalcification of teeth, increased risk of cavities and > the possibility of injury to soft tissues of the mouth from loose or > broken appliances. > > Due to your lack of cooperation, broken appointments and failure to > continue a prescribed treatment plan, I do not accept any responsibility for > your orthodontic treatment. Date: Fri, 28 Apr 2000 20:55:36 +0100 From: Dave Birks To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: Patient Dismissal Message-ID: <3909ECB8.F12A6B96@virgin.net> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Please send me your draft letter re patient dismissal Thanks Dr J. R. Birks BDS D,Orth(Eng)
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 697

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Patient Survey
        by "Dr. Tim Dumore" <drtimbo@mb.sympatico.ca>
  3) Fwd: Virus Education
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  4) Invisalign
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
  5) Ortho Cad
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
  6) associates
        by g russell frankel <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
Date: Fri, 05 May 2000 09:26:00 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000505092600.007cfc30@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"






Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

3





Date: Wed, 3 May 2000 14:55:02 -0500
From: "Dr. Tim Dumore" <drtimbo@mb.sympatico.ca>
To: <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: Patient Survey
Message-ID: <002c01bfb539$94424e80$4f36c8cd@dstn>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0029_01BFB50F.8F872980"

Greetings,
    I intend to send an anonymous survey to my patients with the hope of getting some feedback on how our team is doing (?Do I really want to do this!).  I have an idea of some of the questions that I would like to ask, but I wonder if anyone else has ever done this before.  Anyone care to share their thoughts?
Date: Thu, 4 May 2000 16:48:44 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Fwd: Virus Education
Message-ID: <42.502813e.26433c2c@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed; boundary="part1_42.502813e.26433c2c_boundary"

 
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Full-name: WRed852509
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Date: Thu, 4 May 2000 16:44:16 EDT
Subject: Fwd: Virus Education
To: orthod_l@usc.edu
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed; boundary="part2_42.502813e.26433b20_boundary"
X-Mailer: CompuServe 2000 32-bit sub 101

Hi All,
I thought you would all benefit from this disertation sent to me by my IT
person.
Good Luck!  It was nice to see many of you in Chicago.  This meeting had more
technological content than any AAO meeting before it.
Ron Redmond DDS
Return-Path: <tandrews@langtech.com>
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Date: Thu, 4 May 2000 15:54:51 -0400
From: Tim Andrews <tandrews@langtech.com>
Subject: Virus Education
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From: Tim Andrews <tandrews@langtech.com>
To:
Subject: Virus Education
Date: Thu, 4 May 2000 12:50:53 -0700
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You may have heard about this morning's world-wide virus attack called
"ILOVEYOU", and this is a perfect example of what NOT to do. Opening
attachments without first scanning them for viruses is just asking for
trouble. .exe, .com, .vbs, .js, .ws, .wsf, .bat, and .cmd files (there are
more, but these are the main ones) are executable, that is they are not data
files, they are actually code that executes. If you get any files with these
extensions, NEVER open them from your email program. In fact, don't open
them AT ALL unless you're absolutely sure that they do NOT contain malicious
code. Data files such as .jpg, .mp3, .tif, etc. cannot execute code so they
cannot contain viruses, but Microsoft Word and Excel and other Office
products can contain macros which do execute code. These programs also have
security settings to prevent unauthorized code from executing, but a virus
contained in a program (.exe., .vbs, etc.), or even a macro that someone
chooses to run, could disable this security, so you need to keep an eye on
the security settings to make sure you're protected. A program can do
anything a user can do, such as modify security settings of other programs
and delete files.
 
The Melissa and ILOVEYOU viruses work by reading the victim's address book
and sending itself to everyone in there AS THE USER WHO OPENED IT.
Therefore, it looks like it came from the user who opened the attachment.
The problem with .vbs files is that there's really no way of programatically
determining whether or not it's doing something harmful. Virus scanners have
a list of viruses and they scan for the "signature" of these viruses in
files on your system and sometimes even in email attachments, but these
signatures need to be downloaded every so often in order to have the latest
list. If a new virus hits you before its signature has been downloaded to
your antivirus software, you won't have any protection aside from knowing
not to open it. At the time of this writing, Norton's LiveUpdate still does
not contain the signature for ILOVEYOU. Some virus scanners can detect code
from unknown viruses based on known destructive patterns, but this
technology is still in its infancy and doesn't catch everything. If it did,
antivirus companies would be out of business.
 
Windows Scripting Host programs (.vbs, .js, .ws, .wsf) are very powerful
utilities but the potential for harm is also a huge concern. They are much
like .bat files, which contain DOS commands, but they're written in Visual
Basic or other scripting languages and can do anything a user can do and
more. A program that contains some code such as "myfile.delete()" is not a
bad thing, I use that command myself in scripts I create to clean up
temporary files when my script is finished. But if I said "for each file in
c:\; file.delete(); next", it would delete the entire contents of the hard
drive, which IS a bad thing. Unfortunately the actual code to do that is not
written in stone, there are many ways to do the same thing, therefore it's
practically impossible to write antivirus software that will catch these
programs before they've been discovered. So the only way to find out if a
script is harmful or not is to either have someone familiar with the
scripting language eyeball it and make a decision, or wait until some poor
victim finds out the hard way. The only foolproof method for eliminating
viruses is to never, ever, double-click on an attachment unless you're
absolutely sure that it's safe. Some files are easy, a .jpg file will never
be able to execute code on your system, but others require education. If
you're not sure, ask someone who knows or just delete it. If you must send
an executable file to someone, call them on the phone first and tell them
that the file you're about to send them is OK to execute.
 
Here is a checklist to keep your system as safe as possible:
 
1) Keep your antivirus software up to date. Most have automatic updates you
can configure. Antivirus software can't catch everything but they do help
immensely. Norton and McAfee (and some others) have server versions for NT,
Exchange, Proxy, etc. that can scan files before they even reach the user.
2) Lock down the file permissions on servers and even workstations so users
only have the access they need to get the job done. If my wife accidentally
opened the ILOVEYOU virus (she knows better), it would replicate itself to
everyone in her address book but the MP3s and JPGs on the server would be
safe because she has read-only permissions to them. Viruses can only run
with the permissions of the user who opened them.
3) Administrators, keep a separate admin account and do your day-to-day work
as a regular user. The NT Resource Kit has su.exe, which allows you to run a
program with elevated privileges by supplying the admin name and password,
so you don't have to log out to reset someone's password.
4) Don't open questionable attachments, even if it comes from someone you
know. Unfortunately, not everyone learned from the Melissa virus which was
relatively harmless. ILOVEYOU is very destructive and operates the same way.
5) Closely monitor your applications' security settings, especially Word,
Excel, Internet Explorer, Outlook, and Outlook Express. Microsoft supplies
System Policy files for the entire Office suite and IE that will enforce
settings upon login. Use them.
 
If you have any concerns about your company's security (or lack thereof),
Langtech will be able to provide a comprehensive review of the hardware,
software, and policies in your company and install any necessary software,
hardware, and system policies to make sure your computers are doing all they
can to keep themselves virus-free. The final step (and biggest security
hole) is user education, everyone should know not to open attachments unless
they're absolutely sure they're safe. They haven't written a virus (yet)
that can spread itself without the help of users.

Tim Andrews, MCSE, Sr. Systems Consultant
Langtech Systems Consulting
(800)480-8488 x204
http://www.langtech.com <http://www.langtech.com/>



 
<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
You may have heard about this morning's world-wide virus attack called "ILOVEYOU", and this is a perfect example of what NOT to do. Opening attachments without first scanning them for viruses is just asking for trouble. .exe, .com, .vbs, .js, .ws, .wsf, .bat, and .cmd files (there are more, but these are the main ones) are executable, that is they are not data files, they are actually code that executes. If you get any files with these extensions, NEVER open them from your email program. In fact, don't open them AT ALL unless you're absolutely sure that they do NOT contain malicious code. Data files such as .jpg, .mp3, .tif, etc. cannot execute code so they cannot contain viruses, but Microsoft Word and Excel and other Office products can contain macros which do execute code. These programs also have security settings to prevent unauthorized code from executing, but a virus contained in a program (.exe., .vbs, etc.), or even a macro that someone chooses to run, could disable this security, so you need to keep an eye on the security settings to make sure you're protected. A program can do anything a user can do, such as modify security settings of other programs and delete files.
 
The Melissa and ILOVEYOU viruses work by reading the victim's address book and sending itself to everyone in there AS THE USER WHO OPENED IT. Therefore, it looks like it came from the user who opened the attachment. The problem with .vbs files is that there's really no way of programatically determining whether or not it's doing something harmful. Virus scanners have a list of viruses and they scan for the "signature" of these viruses in files on your system and sometimes even in email attachments, but these signatures need to be downloaded every so often in order to have the latest list. If a new virus hits you before its signature has been downloaded to your antivirus software, you won't have any protection aside from knowing not to open it. At the time of this writing, Norton's LiveUpdate still does not contain the signature for ILOVEYOU. Some virus scanners can detect code from unknown viruses based on known destructive patterns, but this technology is still in its infancy and doesn't catch everything. If it did, antivirus companies would be out of business.
 
Windows Scripting Host programs (.vbs, .js, .ws, .wsf) are very powerful utilities but the potential for harm is also a huge concern. They are much like .bat files, which contain DOS commands, but they're written in Visual Basic or other scripting languages and can do anything a user can do and more. A program that contains some code such as "myfile.delete()" is not a bad thing, I use that command myself in scripts I create to clean up temporary files when my script is finished. But if I said "for each file in c:\; file.delete(); next", it would delete the entire contents of the hard drive, which IS a bad thing. Unfortunately the actual code to do that is not written in stone, there are many ways to do the same thing, therefore it's practically impossible to write antivirus software that will catch these programs before they've been discovered. So the only way to find out if a script is harmful or not is to either have someone familiar with the scripting language eyeball it and make a decision, or wait until some poor victim finds out the hard way. The only foolproof method for eliminating viruses is to never, ever, double-click on an attachment unless you're absolutely sure that it's safe. Some files are easy, a .jpg file will never be able to execute code on your system, but others require education. If you're not sure, ask someone who knows or just delete it. If you must send an executable file to someone, call them on the phone first and tell them that the file you're about to send them is OK to execute.
 
Here is a checklist to keep your system as safe as possible:
 
1) Keep your antivirus software up to date. Most have automatic updates you can configure. Antivirus software can't catch everything but they do help immensely. Norton and McAfee (and some others) have server versions for NT, Exchange, Proxy, etc. that can scan files before they even reach the user.
2) Lock down the file permissions on servers and even workstations so users only have the access they need to get the job done. If my wife accidentally opened the ILOVEYOU virus (she knows better), it would replicate itself to everyone in her address book but the MP3s and JPGs on the server would be safe because she has read-only permissions to them. Viruses can only run with the permissions of the user who opened them.
3) Administrators, keep a separate admin account and do your day-to-day work as a regular user. The NT Resource Kit has su.exe, which allows you to run a program with elevated privileges by supplying the admin name and password, so you don't have to log out to reset someone's password.
4) Don't open questionable attachments, even if it comes from someone you know. Unfortunately, not everyone learned from the Melissa virus which was relatively harmless. ILOVEYOU is very destructive and operates the same way.
5) Closely monitor your applications' security settings, especially Word, Excel, Internet Explorer, Outlook, and Outlook Express. Microsoft supplies System Policy files for the entire Office suite and IE that will enforce settings upon login. Use them.
 
If you have any concerns about your company's security (or lack thereof), Langtech will be able to provide a comprehensive review of the hardware, software, and policies in your company and install any necessary software, hardware, and system policies to make sure your computers are doing all they can to keep themselves virus-free. The final step (and biggest security hole) is user education, everyone should know not to open attachments unless they're absolutely sure they're safe. They haven't written a virus (yet) that can spread itself without the help of users.

Tim Andrews, MCSE, Sr. Systems Consultant
Langtech Systems Consulting
(800)480-8488 x204
http://www.langtech.com

 
Date: Thu, 4 May 2000 22:57:55 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <007001bfb63d$b709db40$2fc84fd8@pavilion>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_006D_01BFB61C.2EEBAD40"

Dear Group,
 
It appears that everyone agrees that Invisalign will allow the general dentist to utilize its services.  Does anyone think that Invisalign will set up Invisalign Centers around the country ( similar to Smile Centers or Bleaching Centers)?
 
Sincerely,
Roy King
Jupiter,Fl
 
P.S. It was nice to see old friends at the AAO meeting.
Date: Thu, 4 May 2000 23:12:36 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Ortho Cad
Message-ID: <008301bfb63f$c42028a0$2fc84fd8@pavilion>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0080_01BFB61E.3C0B2260"

To EOSC
 
What are the chances of eliminating our plaster models and substituting them with 3-D models from Ortho Cad?  The cost is $35 and the effect on the parent is high techish.  Will the ABO accept?  The images are watermark to show no tampering.It appears that high tech is rapidly changing orthodontics.  Does anyone have any opinions on how Acuscape is going to effect ou diagnosis in orthodontics?  It is certainly an exciting technology.
 
Go Gators!
Roy King
The Planet before Saturn,Fl
Date: Fri, 05 May 2000 07:54:59 -0400
From: g russell frankel <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: associates
Message-ID: <3912B693.310184FE@cinci.rr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

for those looking for associates out of residencies:
Reaching the end of a job interview, the Human Resources
Person asked a young Engineer fresh out of MIT, "And what
starting salary were you looking for?"

The Engineer said, "In the neighborhood of $125,000 a year,
depending on the benefits package."

The interviewer said, "Well, what would you say to a package
of 5 weeks vacation, 14 paid holidays, full medical and dental,
company matching retirement fund to 50% of salary, and a
company car leased every 2 years - say, a red Corvette?"

The Engineer sat up straight and said, "Wow! Are you kidding?"
And the interviewer replied, "Yeah, but you started it."

g r frankel

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 698

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  3) Re: Patient Survey
        by MDLhome <mdlively@gate.net>
  4) Re: Ortho Cad
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  5) Re: Invisalign
        by YURFEST@aol.com
  6) Re: Patient Survey
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  7) Invisalign
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
  8) funny engineering story
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
  9)
        by "erx007tr" <erx007tr@libero.it>
 10) Transfer patient
        by atindall <atindall@dove.net.au>
Date: Mon, 08 May 2000 18:03:13 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000508180313.007d3780@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

4


Date: Mon, 15 May 2000 12:21:28 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000515122128.007d7100@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

5





Date: Fri, 05 May 2000 13:46:43 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@gate.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Patient Survey
Message-ID: <39130903.9439F6F9@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Tim:

Up until a year ago, we used to send out a survey to all active patients
in treatment at their six month mark.   We would simply run a report on
all patients that became ACT for a certain month six months earlier.

We asked questions pertaining to service provided, ease in financing,
attention to details, ease in making appointments, perception as if our
office ran on time, comfort and of course if they thought things were
going more smoothly than they had intended.  These questions had
multiple choice answers along with blanks for comments.  I also asked
that they make comments about the staff - positive and negative.

They could sign their name or not.  We had close to an 80% response
rate.  We would send out one color for adult patients and one for
parents of patients.  After doing this for three years and fine tuning
the office based on constructive criticisms, we stopped sending out the
forms.  Stopping had more to do with not knowing how to run the same
report with our new system than not being interested in parent/patient
comments anymore.

I would highly recommend it.  I would also tell you not to bother doing
it if you are only looking for the praises.  You had better have some
thick skin and be open minded.  Some comments are ridiculous but at
least you get a better idea of what is expected of you and what the
patient/parent perception might be.

Good luck,  Mark

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@gate.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Fri, 5 May 2000 17:47:20 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Ortho Cad
Message-ID: <c5.506c42c.26449b68@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hey Roy,
I'm here in Lyon, France following the AAO meeting (and my wife).  We have
been using OrthoCad for about 6 months, but impressions are still necessary. 
Redmond Orthodontics has agreed to beta test Orametrics which does intraoral
scanning, produces a 3D model which can be segregated into individual teeth
and then diagnostic setups are possible.  Expansion, interproximal reduction,
extraction patterns, etc.  Once you decide on treatment, then Orametrics
provides indirect bonding trays with brackets of your choice and archwires to
get from beginning to end with least change.  Imagine the effect of knowing
from visit to visit how much tooth movement has taken place (and if it is in
the proper direction).  This would require scanning at each visit, but think
of the possibilities.  My two sons and I have a bet as to whose treatment
protocol will more quickly achieve the finished result.  Also, we will
determine if 2 week or 12 week intervals are better (or something in
between). 
It appears we have a dichotomy, Invisalign or Oralmetrics, but maybe they
will survive side-by-side.  What a wonderful time for orthodontists!  We have
never had the capability to micro-measure our techniques, but now it is
available.  Who will survive?  Wait for the next chapter of "Day of Our Lives
(Orthodontics)." 
I think I have consumed too much wine tonight, but I hope you understand my
concept.
It was certainly nice to see all you computer "geeks" in Chicago.
Ron Redmond DDS
Lyon, France
ronredmond@compuserve.com
Date: Fri, 5 May 2000 21:46:17 EDT
From: YURFEST@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <22.5663ec7.2644d369@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I remember when the big worry was that pedodontists and GP's would take all
the ortho cases by using straight wire brackets. I suggest we worry about our
stock portfolios instead.  
Paul Yurfest
Atlanta, GO BRAVES!!
Date: Fri, 05 May 2000 22:46:16 -0400
From: Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Patient Survey
Message-ID: <39138777.13896C31@utoronto.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
 boundary="------------AF7BD0E2655DA607B35F86B6"

Never done it, but the information I have received is to let an experienced outside 3rd party handle it for you. TGS.

"Dr. Tim Dumore" wrote:
 Greetings,    I intend to send an anonymous survey to my patients with the hope of getting some feedback on how our team is doing (?Do I really want to do this!).  I have an idea of some of the questions that I would like to ask, but I wonder if anyone else has ever done this before.  Anyone care to share their thoughts?
Date: Sat, 6 May 2000 06:35:23 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <37.4cdedda.26454f6b@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Group,

It appears that everyone agrees that Invisalign will allow the general =
dentist to utilize its services.  Does anyone think that Invisalign will =
set up Invisalign Centers around the country ( similar to Smile Centers =
or Bleaching Centers)?

Sincerely,
Roy King
Jupiter,Fl


I would like to point out that the introduction of "straightwire" 20 years
ago was viewed as a way to let the "general dentist's nose under the tent of
orthodontics."  While it certainly has had an effect of making us less
exclusive, it really does not seem to be a major problem. 

I predict that Invisalign will do something similar.  Yes, it will have an
effect; yes they most likely will open Invisalign franchises; and for those
of you who thought they bought a franchise when you went through your ortho
residencies, welcome to the reality of modern business.  Not just for ortho
is the world more and more competitive.

You may have noticed that Unitek has done very well since the Ormco bought A
Company.  Unitek did not stand on the sidelines and say, "Gee, we already
have 20% market share.  That's enough.  Ormco deserves a chance also."  The
Unitek reps worked the situation hard and converted two major accounts in my
area from Ormco to Unitek.  That's business.  I for one don't see a problem.

As far as technology taking over the market place, it was a great meeting.  I
would love to have a Suresmile robot in the lab.  If I could afford that, I
would stop buying large size gloves.  Now that I think about it, I need to
run a cost benefit analysis on the cost of gloves vs. the cost of the
Suresmile scanner and robot.

Seriously, the world changes but not everything sticks.  Some years ago,
Dolphin started as a way to eliminate xrays for cephs.  We were all going to
scan our patients and create an "image" but not a ceph.  Last I looked, no
one is doing that and Dolphin has metamorphisized into a more traditional
imaging company.

I also looked at the Serona (sic?) Digital Xray machine which involved CCD
technology.  $55,000.  That means $110,000 if you have two offices.  Maybe
that will fly and maybe not.  Great images but the CCD is very fragile and it
has to be physcially move from the ceph to the pan locations on the machine. 
This means that it is going to be moved multiple times per day.

I asked the rep how fragile a CCD unit was since I had heard that was a
problem.  She told me that they teach the DA's that they need to think of the
CCD as a newborn.  In other words, no dropping allowed.  For those of you
without OB-GYN trained DA's, $8,000 for a replacement CCD although you
probably can buy a rider for your insurance. 

Still a great system with great technology except the patient has to stand
still for 14 seconds for a ceph.  I have some young patients who can't stand
still for a 0.5 sec ceph.  Time will tell.  Actually, this will probably fly.

Anyone else care to make specific comments about things they saw.

Charlie Ruff
Date: Sat, 6 May 2000 06:35:22 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: funny engineering story
Message-ID: <9b.49e0d9e.26454f6a@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



for those looking for associates out of residencies:
Reaching the end of a job interview, the Human Resources
Person asked a young Engineer fresh out of MIT, "And what
starting salary were you looking for?"

The Engineer said, "In the neighborhood of $125,000 a year,
depending on the benefits package."

The interviewer said, "Well, what would you say to a package
of 5 weeks vacation, 14 paid holidays, full medical and dental,
company matching retirement fund to 50% of salary, and a
company car leased every 2 years - say, a red Corvette?"

The Engineer sat up straight and said, "Wow! Are you kidding?"
And the interviewer replied, "Yeah, but you started it."

g r frankel

I know this is a funny story but the reality of the market place is very
close to the first part of the story, not the second part.  All I hear is how
hard it is to find an associate.  This is a nightmare for the senior ortho
who truly wants to retire.  He or she can't.

For work dogs like me, I intend to let my estate worry about the practice.

Best wishes

Charlie Ruff
Date: Wed, 10 May 2000 10:24:35 +0200
From: "erx007tr" <erx007tr@libero.it>
To: "ESCO - ORTODONZIA" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Message-ID: <002401bfba59$2dcf9de0$20851c97@celeron>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0021_01BFBA69.F0212660"

HELLO
what can I do when there is agenesia of 2 lower prem and ankylosis of E in a patient female 17 ys old.
I don't want to extract E and (maybe 15-25) and close the spaces: she 's a deep bite.
 
your sicerely
dr errico Bucci Orthodontist
Date: Mon, 15 May 2000 20:38:23 +0930
From: atindall <atindall@dove.net.au>
To: Ortho Study Club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Transfer patient
Message-ID: <391FDAA6.AB60558A@dove.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear group,
A patient I am currently treating is moving to Washington D.C. later
this year. Can anyone help with continuing her treatment. I am treating
her with the Begg Lightwire technique and I would prefer that this be
continued rather than having to change brackets .
Andrew Tindall
Adelaide
Australia
atindall@dove.net.au.

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 699

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: funny engineering story
        by MDLhome <mdlively@gate.net>
  3) RE:
        by ABRAHAM LIFSHITZ <alifshitz@mexis.com>
  4) Will work for food
        by Roncone <roncone@hsc.usc.edu>
Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 18:29:43 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000521182943.007acbb0@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

6

Date: Mon, 15 May 2000 21:05:56 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@gate.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: funny engineering story
Message-ID: <39209EF4.B7B030DA@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



Orthodmd@aol.com wrote:

> for those looking for associates out of residencies:
> Reaching the end of a job interview, the Human Resources
> Person asked a young Engineer fresh out of MIT, "And what
> starting salary were you looking for?"
>
> The Engineer said, "In the neighborhood of $125,000 a year,
> depending on the benefits package."
>
> The interviewer said, "Well, what would you say to a package
> of 5 weeks vacation, 14 paid holidays, full medical and dental,
> company matching retirement fund to 50% of salary, and a
> company car leased every 2 years - say, a red Corvette?"
>
> The Engineer sat up straight and said, "Wow! Are you kidding?"
> And the interviewer replied, "Yeah, but you started it."
>
> g r frankel
>
> I know this is a funny story but the reality of the market place is very
> close to the first part of the story, not the second part.  All I hear is how
> hard it is to find an associate.  This is a nightmare for the senior ortho
> who truly wants to retire.  He or she can't.
>
> For work dogs like me, I intend to let my estate worry about the practice.
>
> Best wishes
>
> Charlie Ruff

Not to sound ludicrous but what if one had to finish all of their patients and
then close the doors.  Equipment was written off, building that they owned could
be leased for additional income or sold and one's savings  would be used for
retirement (the way it was supposed to be used).  So, what if you could not sell
that practice?  Would it really be the end of the world?  Are we really that
dependent on what we may or not sell our practices for?

Considering that most in the workforce do not own their own businesses but rather
work for someone else, how do they manage to live out their lives with no
business to sell at the end.  Although the sale of a practice is everyone's
desire, is the thought of possibly not doing so the end of the world?  Is it
worth selling to a MSO just in case?

I do hope that I have saved enough in the end that the sale of my practice does
not make a difference.  We are part of a great profession that rewards us
handsomely.  My wife has already told me that I am giving the practice to my kids
so I am planning on living off of my savings and not the value of my practice.
If my kids do not go into this great profession and I end up selling my practice
for a buck, the grandkids will be guaranteed a great education and I get to
splurge or make a few charities very happy.

In the end, if we do not bank on selling our business for retirement, our mindset
will be different and we will plan around it.  Then selling it simply becomes
icing on the cake rather than the focus of our retirement.  I know my financial
adviser never considered the sale of my practice part of our retirement plan.

What do I know?  I am just a 10 year veteran with some distance between now and
then.  Maybe I will change my mind when retirement grows nearer.  I do know that
it is not a part of my retirement package at this point in my life.  Goodwill is
great but sometimes difficult to sell.  Hard assets' values may change but they
still have some value.

Mark

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@gate.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Tue, 16 May 2000 21:37:59 -0500
From: ABRAHAM LIFSHITZ <alifshitz@mexis.com>
To: erx007tr <erx007tr@libero.it>, ESCO - ORTODONZIA <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: RE:
Message-ID: <005101bfbfa9$4bb514c0$db93e994@computer>
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: multipart/alternative;
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Enrico:
If the patient has a deep bite, I would suggest you to avoid any extraction, because, that will deepen the bite.
I hope this helps.
Sincerely,
 
Abraham B. Lifshitz D.D.S., M.S.
Professor
Graduate Orthodontic Program
Intercontinental University
College of Dentistry
Mexico City, Mexico
           *
Editor in Chief
The Orthodontic CYBERjournal (OC-J)
http://www.OC-J.com
 
----- Original Message -----
From: erx007tr
To: ESCO - ORTODONZIA
Sent: Wednesday, May 10, 2000 3:24 AM

HELLO
what can I do when there is agenesia of 2 lower prem and ankylosis of E in a patient female 17 ys old.
I don't want to extract E and (maybe 15-25) and close the spaces: she 's a deep bite.
 
your sicerely
dr errico Bucci Orthodontist
Date: Wed, 17 May 2000 20:43:45 -0700
From: Roncone <roncone@hsc.usc.edu>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Will work for food
Message-ID: <3.0.32.20000517204238.00692108@pop.primenet.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear ESCO Members,

Anyone catch the May 22nd issue of Time Magazine (p. 73)?  They did an
article about the 10 hottest jobs of the next decade and the 10 jobs that
will disappear.  Number six on the list of jobs soon to
disappear......orthodontists.  Apparently these little, computer-generated
plastic things called "aligners" will soon make our profession obsolete.
Guess I should pull out and dust off the ol' resume.  Alternately, I could
tear up my ortho certificate, practice as a GP, and wait for my friendly
Invisalign rep to come knocking.

Chris Roncone
Vista, CA

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 700

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
  May 2000,  Vol. 117, No. 5
        by "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com> (by way of Joseph Zernik <jzernik@hsc.usc.edu>)
  3) response to recent TIME issue
        by Caitlin Murphy <caitlin@fenton.com>
  4) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 699
        by Ormond Grimes <ogrimes@internetpro.net>
  5) Wilkodontics
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  6) Re: New Engaland Orthorodontisssstsss
        by =?iso-8859-1?q?blair=20ADAMS?= <adams519@yahoo.com>
  7) 20th Congress of the EBSO, Jerusalem, ISRAEL 2001
        by "Tom Weinberger" <tomwein@cc.huji.ac.il>
Date: Fri, 26 May 2000 15:10:56 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000526151056.007e1530@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

7




Date: Sun, 21 May 2000 23:12:53 -0700
From: "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com> (by way of Joseph Zernik <jzernik@hsc.usc.edu>)
To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
Subject: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
  May 2000,  Vol. 117, No. 5
Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.20000521231253.008fc4f0@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Table of Contents for May 2000, Vol. 117, No. 5
http://www.mosby.com/ajodo
--------------------------------------------------------------
American Association of Orthodontists: A Century of Smiles

Orthodontia: Its outlook
Rolf G. Behrents
Dallas, Tex
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106121

Vignette: T. M. Graber
Lee Graber
Kenilworth, Ill
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106017

The American Association of Orthodontist at 2000: Some thoughts for the
new millennium
Ronald S. Moen
St Louis, Mo
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106935

The American Association of Orthodontists: For our common good, today
and tomorrow
Mervin W. Graham, Michael D. Rennert
Denver, Colo and Montreal, Canada
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106338

American Board of Orthodontics: Past, present, and future
James L. Vaden, Vincent G. Kokich
Cookeville, Tenn, and Tacoma, Wash
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106023

American Association of Orthodontists Foundation: Past, present, and
future
John K. Pershing, Jr, Daniel E. Even
Hastings, Neb, and Orange, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106279

The World Federation of Orthodontists: “Bringing the world together”
William H. DeKock, Lee W. Graber
Cedar Rapids, Iowa, and Kenilworth, Ill
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106024

Toward understanding the molecular basis of craniofacial growth and
development
Harold Slavkin
Bethesda, Md
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106502

Stop me before I write again ...
Lysle E. Johnston
Ann Arbor, Mich
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105875

Evidence-based treatment strategies: An ambition for the future
Anthony A. Gianelly
Boston, Mass
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105876

The evolution of orthodontics to a data-based specialty
William R. Proffit
Chapel Hill, NC
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106011

Clinical research about clinical treatment: A new agenda for a new
century
Sheldon Baumrind
Berkeley, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106015

Tomorrow’s challenges for the science of orthodontics
Peter M. Sinclair
Los Angeles, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106339

The contributions of craniofacial growth to clinical orthodontics
Ram S. Nanda
Oklahoma City, Okla
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106118

A statement regarding early treatment
Robert M. Ricketts
Scottsdale, Ariz
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106020

The significance of late developmental crowding to early treatment
planning for incisor crowding
Donald G. Woodside
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106117

Orthodontic relapse versus natural development
Birgit Thilander
G&ouml;teborg, Sweden
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106019

Serial extraction ... nobody does that anymore!
Jack G. Dale
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106014

Maxillary transverse deficiency
James A. McNamara, Jr
Ann Arbor, Mich
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105879

Dentofacial orthopedics or orthognathic surgery: Is it a matter of age?
Hans Pancherz
Giessen, Germany
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105575

Orthodontics about face: The re-emergence of the esthetic paradigm
David M. Sarver, James L. Ackerman
Birmingham, Ala, and Bryn Mawr, Pa
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106018

The mysteries of asymmetries
Donald R. Joondeph
Seattle, Wash
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106221

2D or not 2D? That is the question
J. P. Moss
London, England
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106025

Looking back and forward through my career in orthodontics
Fujio Miura
Tokyo, Japan
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105880

Orthodontic magic
James L. Vaden
Cookeville, Tenn
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106016

Clubs, quips, phrases, and hype: Musings for the new millennium
Harry L. Dougherty
Los Angeles, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106431

Orthodontic biomechanics: Vistas from the top of a new century
Robert P. Kusy
Chapel Hill, NC
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106281

Orthodontic bonding to artificial tooth surfaces: Clinical versus
laboratory findings
Björn U. Zachrisson
Oslo, Norway
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106022

Ceramic brackets and the need to develop national standards
Samir E. Bishara
Iowa City, Iowa
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105874

Orthodontics as a science: The role of biomechanics
Charles Burstone
Farmington, Conn
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106013

Enhancing the value of orthodontic treatment: Incorporating effective
preventive dentistry into treatment
Robert L. Boyd
San Francisco, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106021

The evolutionary tidal wave
R. G. “Wick” Alexander
Arlington, Tex
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105877

Contemporary technology-centered practice
David L. Turpin
Seattle, Wash
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106120

One viewpoint on teaching clinical orthodontics
Robert J. Isaacson
Richmond, Va
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106119

The winds of change
Alex Jacobson
Birmingham, Ala
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106012

Orthodontics in the next 100 years: Prediction or speculation?
Larson R. Keso
Oklahoma City, Okla
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106009

The decade ahead: Finding a better way
Arthur A. Dugoni
San Francisco, Calif
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106010

Pride in orthodontics
T. M. Graber
Chicago, Ill
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106280

In Memoriam

William A. Mitchell, Jr
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1175621

Ortho Bytes

Do you have a satellite office in cyberspace?
James K. Mah
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a107638

Litigation, Legislation, and Ethics

If a professional practice is a small business...
Laurance Jerrold
Massapequa, NY
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1175624

Department of Reviews and Abstracts

Evaluation of a hyperbolic mathematical model to describe human
mandibular growth and development
J. Reutter
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175br01

A systematic review of the relationship between overjet size and
traumatic dental injuries
Q. V. Nguyen, P. D. Bezemer, L. Habets, B. Prahl-Andersen
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175br02

Skeletal and dental changes following the use of the Frankel functional
regulator
C. D. J. Rushforth, P. H. Gordon, J. C. Aird
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175br03

Breathing obstruction in relation to craniofacial and dental arch
morphology in 4 year-old children
Lofstrand-Tidestrom B. Thilander, J. Ahlqvist-Rastad, O. Jakobsson, E.
Hultcrabtz
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175br04

The effect of mechanical stress cycling on recycled human teeth: A dual
part study
K. Kapus
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175br05

Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations

The American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies,
the American Board of Orthodontists, the American Association of
Orthodontists Foundation Board of Directors, and the College of
Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175oo

Reader’S Services

Editorial Board
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175eb

Information for Readers
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Bound volumes available to subscribers
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175bv001

Availability of journal back issues
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175av001

AAO Meeting calendar
http://www1.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001175mc002

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Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 15:42:08 -0400
From: Caitlin Murphy <caitlin@fenton.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: response to recent TIME issue
Message-ID: <4.2.2.20000522153241.00a44100@199.245.22.2>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="=====================_7136604==_.ALT"

TIME magazine's May 22 issue ran a story predicting the 10 upcoming hottest jobs and the 10 jobs headed for extinction (pp. 72-73).  They mention orthodontists in the latter category, and base this claim on the advances in the industry made by the Invisalign System (created by Align Technology).  Please read on for Align's response to this article, which reflects the company's position on this issue.
Thank you.

Dear TIME editors,

Your tongue-in-cheek article "What Will Be the 10 Hottest Jobs and What Jobs Will Disappear” [May 22] was an interesting read, but flawed in prophesizing the demise of orthodontists.  I’m the President and Co-Founder of Align Technology, makers of the Invisalign System (you mention our aligners in your article).  It’s simply untrue that computer advances will render orthodontists obsolete.  While Invisalign’s ability to straighten adult teeth (through a series of removable, clear plastic aligners) is made possible by advanced 3-D imaging technology, the system relies on the diagnostic expertise and treatment skills of orthodontists to work.

Adults currently make up approximately 20% of all orthodontic cases, though an estimated 2/3 to 3/4 of the adult population could benefit from orthodontic treatment.  Adults wanted an alternative to metal braces.  Now, with Invisalign on the market, we expect many more adults will get their teeth straightened.  More adults in treatment could actually mean we need more, not fewer, orthodontists.  Already more than one-third of US orthodontists have been certified to use Invisalign.  Invisalign is now available commercially across the US and Canada.  For more information, readers can visit the website at www.invisalign.com.

Sincerely,

Kelsey Wirth
President
Align Technology, Inc. Sunnyvale, California
(408) 738-7101
Date: Mon, 22 May 2000 22:41:15 -0500
From: Ormond Grimes <ogrimes@internetpro.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 699
Message-ID: <3929FDD4.DADE6B1E@internetpro.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Mark Lively wrote:

>Not to sound ludicrous but what if one had to finish all of their
patients and
>then close the doors.  Equipment was written off, building that they
owned could
>be leased for additional income or sold and one's savings  would be
used for
>retirement (the way it was supposed to be used).  So, what if you could
not sell
>that practice?  Would it really be the end of the world?  Are we really that
>dependent on what we may or not sell our practices for?

My reply: 

I am the other end, Mark, having practiced almost four times as long as
your ten years.  I don't own my building. I rent.  My office is in an
expensive prime spot in my town.  I have equipment that has not been
written off yet because it was bought only a few years ago.  I try to
keep my technique up to date by going to clinics, meetings, etc.  I
cannot see myself paying the overhead (rent, utilities, salaries, etc.)
I would have to pay to finish all of my patients. How can I afford to do
this when the last few patients occupy the time previously allocated for
several hundred? I do not depend on selling my practice for my
retirement.   I would like to choose and train someone who would make
the transition much easier for the patients,  and for me.  If I can get
some compensation for this, so much the better.  With graduates looking
for the big time practice, I'm afraid I may be out of the loop. My
practice is small--less than 300 K/year.  I am sort of at a loss to be
able to know how I might successfully make this transition.  I wish it
were as simple for me as it apparently is for you.  Orm
--
Orm's Web Site is <http://www.Rainbow-Ortho.org>
Mailto:HeyOrm@Orthodontist.net
Date: Tue, 23 May 2000 22:53:55 -0400
From: Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
To: Orthodontic List <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Wilkodontics
Message-ID: <392B4443.9ED0066E@utoronto.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Anybody heard of a technique called "Wilkodontics" (I think that's what
it's called) whereby corticotomies are done to speed tooth movement? Any
information would helpful. TGS.

Date: Tue, 23 May 2000 18:37:20 -0700 (PDT)
From: blair ADAMS <adams519@yahoo.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: New Engaland Orthorodontisssstsss
Message-ID: <20000524013720.12981.qmail@web906.mail.yahoo.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit


--- orthod-l@usc.edu wrote: >
>                           ORTHOD-L Digest 677
> y is it; we never c any of r colleegs frum ortho
scoool x ept charli ruff; y is he d only 1 who has any
presnentz on this web site, i look n i look n no
matter wer i g o or wat couses i take non of my
co-educashunists show up at meetings courses or
convenshuns ????????????????????????????

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Send instant messages & get email alerts with Yahoo! Messenger.
http://im.yahoo.com/
Date: Wed, 24 May 2000 09:59:05 +0300
From: "Tom Weinberger" <tomwein@cc.huji.ac.il>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: 20th Congress of the EBSO, Jerusalem, ISRAEL 2001
Message-ID: <000a01bfc54d$8e3bca60$2e0d4084@benjywtcs>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0006_01BFC566.B251BAE0"

 
Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\The European Begg Society of Orthodontics1.doc"
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 701

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) ABO in Halifax
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
  3) Retirement issues
        by "Richard Vlock" <rvlock@klink.net>
  4) transition
        by g russell frankel <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
  5) sterilizers
        by "William R. Hyman" <babbitecho@earthlink.net>
  6) Wilckodontics and more
        by Drted35@aol.com
  7) bracket design
        by "jose maria feliu" <jfeliu@airtel.net>
Date: Tue, 30 May 2000 14:16:28 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000530141628.007a1950@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

8


Date: Fri, 26 May 2000 22:04:40 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: ABO in Halifax
Message-ID: <c0.439b0da.26608738@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

For all of those planning on attending the College of Diplomates meeting in
Halifax, please leave your deodorant at home or be prepared to be arrested
for criminal assault.

Charlie Ruff


    HALIFAX, Nova Scotia - Perfume is meant to provoke passion, but not the
sort stirring this
      historic seaport.

 To the horror of perfume makers worldwide, Halifax has become the first
major center in North
 America to prohibit the wearing of all cosmetic fragrances - from Giorgio to
grandmother's lavender
 soap - in most indoor public places, including municipal offices, libraries,
hospitals, classrooms, courts,
 and mass transit buses.

 With little fanfare, and less public debate, a city renowned for its sea
breezes and friendly folk has
 declared underarm deodorant, herbal shampoos, colognes, and other scented
products to be hazardous
 to public health - or at least too politically incorrect to be countenanced.
The ban, backed by ardent
 scent opponents, reflects not only concern for people discomforted by
fragrances but a grim new
 environmental view that sees a morning slap of aftershave as a blow against
Mother Earth.

 ''Aromatic chemicals are poisoning people and the planet as much as tobacco
or pesticides,'' said
 Karen Robinson, an anti-scent campaigner who compares the fight against
fragrances to writer
 Rachel Carson's celebrated early warnings about the effects of DDT, a
powerful insecticide now
 restricted by law. ''We don't want a `Silent Spring' brought by cosmetics in
Halifax. We've even got
 scent-free doughnut shops.''

 Meanwhile, students have been suspended from class for wearing hair gel and
other scented goo (one
 nearly landed in jail for ''assaulting'' his teacher's olfactory senses); an
84-year-old woman was
 booted out of City Hall for wafting her customary cologne while making a
civic inquiry; and another
 woman was ordered off a city bus for smelling too sweet.

 Private enterprise is joining the crusade with surprising alacrity. The
Chronicle-Herald, dominant
 newspaper in the city of 350,000, has ordered its employees to refrain from
even ''strong
 mouthwash.'' Other companies send perfumed or deodorant-wearing workers home
to a take shower,
 deducting the lost time from their paychecks.

 Critics are calling it the Halifax Hysteria.

 ''We're abandoning common sense in order to placate a small handful of
individuals bothered by
 scents,'' said City Council or Steve Streatch, one of the few local
politicians willing to speak for the
 record on what has become a highly emotional issue, with campaigners wearing
gas masks turning out
 to jeer anyone opposing their view.

 ''People have been wearing fragrances since biblical times,'' Streatch said.
''If someone wears too
 much, if they become obnoxious to people around them, then a friend should
speak to them. Or a
 work supervisor. But bringing government into what people dab on their face
or rub into their
 underarms is just too much like Big Brother.''

 But anti-fragrance advocates hail Halifax as standard-bearer for a
burgeoning New Age movement.
 In the United States, only Marin County, California, has displayed similar
zeal in combating perfumes
 and other fragrances. But its ''ban'' on scents in civic places remains
voluntary.

 ''Almost alone, this good city up in Nova Scotia is showing the courage to
take a stand against
 neurologically toxic chemicals guised as fragrance,'' said Fred Nelson of
the Michigan-based National
 Foundation for the Chemically Hypersensitive. ''Canadians are showing an
empathy for victims of the
 cosmetic chemical industry that seems to be lacking among Americans.''

 At the heart of the hullabaloo is a syndrome called Multiple Chemical
Sensitivity, also known as
 environmental illness. Sufferers claim that the ubiquitous presence of
chemicals in modern life has a
 cumulative effect that causes some individuals to become violently ill at a
whiff of any scent, whether
 Chanel No. 5 or Irish Spring.

 The trouble is, most US and Canadian physicians and researchers refuse to
recognize Multiple
 Chemical Sensitivity as a true organic disease. Specialists say some people
do suffer severely from
 exposure to perfumes and scented cosmetics, but the reasons are poorly
understood and the reactions
 - including headaches, vomiting, and seizures - do not appear to be caused
by genuine physical
 allergies, much less poisoning.

 By and large, mainstream epidemiologists and occupational health doctors
believe Multiple Chemical
 Sensitivity is a complex psychological, or ''psychosocial'' malady.

 ''What's taking place in Halifax appears to be collective hysteria over an
illness that does not exist,''
 said Dr. Ron House, an epidemiologist at the Occupational Health Center at
Toronto's St. Michael's
 Hospital.

 ''The uproar is fascinating from a cultural view. But [the ban on
fragrances] isn't good medicine, it's
 folly - political pandering to a few rather strident activists,'' he said.
''Sadly, the whole business leaves
 Halifax looking more crackpot than compassionate.''

 In a case that made world headlines, a 17-year-old student named Gary
Falkenham last month was
 handed over to the Royal Canadian Mounted Police by officials at a Halifax
area high school after
 showing up in class wearing Dippity Do hair gel and Aqua Velva deodorant.
His scent-sensitive
 teacher, Tanya MacDonald, demanded that he be charged with criminal assault
for supposedly
 jeopardizing her health.

 ''This is insanity,'' said Charles Low, president of the Canadian Cosmetic
Toiletry and Fragrance
 Association. ''This teenager was threatened not only with expulsion but a
criminal record for wearing
 deodorant.''

 The RCMP dutifully investigated but finally declined to bring charges. ''We
can't ignore complaints,
 but maybe this kind of thing is better resolved with dialogue,'' said
Sergeant Wayne Noonan.

 The school backed away from demands that Falkenham be prosecuted, and
instead suspended him
 for two days.

 Nancy Radcliffe, columnist for the Halifax Daily News and one of the few
Haligonians to raise a
 public voice against the fragrance ban, said Canada's famously civil society
has lately become far too
 credulous when confronted by anyone claiming to be a victim.

 ''Our problem is, we're too darn polite,'' she wrote recently. ''We don't
want to inconvenience anyone,
 so we're constantly giving up our rights because somebody claims it's
offending them.''

 Manufacturers of scented products are stunned by events unfurling in
Halifax, where sales of scented
 products have plunged 25 percent, according to local retailers. They are
most appalled that their
 industry is being cast as a ''merchant of death,'' in a league with Big
Tobacco and gunmakers.

 But cosmetics makers and perfumers may be in for a long battle. The
anti-scent movement appears
 to enjoy some support beyond the hard-core activists.

 ''The rest of the country may think we are a bunch of crackpots, but I
believe some people are
 canaries in a coal mine,'' Stephanie Domet, an editor at The Coast, a Nova
Scotia weekly, told the
 Toronto-based Globe and Mail newspaper. ''We've created a world where some
people are overly
 sensitive to chemicals. So is it really such a hardship for you not to be
able to pour on the Charlie?''
Date: Sun, 28 May 2000 08:44:15 -0400
From: "Richard Vlock" <rvlock@klink.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Retirement issues
Message-ID: <01bfc8a2$6edd0960$3c7714d0@richardv>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0040_01BFC880.E7CB6960"

I see that the subject of retirement and disposal of an orthodontic practice has come up again  and I would like to discuss my experience, having retired last year.
 
Dr. Grimes has put his finger on a very vexing issue: what to do if you have a practice that is modest in size.My own practice was not large enough to attract  any buyers, so my solution was to decide on a retirement date and then work an additional two years, treating the income from that period as though it had come from a buyer. I then arranged with a nearby orthodontist to take over my practice at no cost to him. Obviously, he would have inherited my patients anyway if I had just closed my office. We had an arrangement whereby I worked in his office for a certain period of time, about 6 months, I think, getting my patients ready for the transfer. My building, which I owned, was sold without much trouble , but not to a dentist.
 
If I had had a million dollar practice it would have been easy to hire an associate to eventually take over, but with a smaller practice, you can't do that, as there is insufficient cash flow for that.
 
However, being aware of the situation for many years prior to retirement I made sure that I always made the maximum contribution to my Keogh plan. I can't emphasize how important that is. At present, thanks to that strategy, my retirement account has  grown to the point where I make more income than I ever made doing  orthodontics. So, as Dr. Lively has astutely pointed out, the disposal of the practice should not be the prime consideration when contemplating retirement. Hopefully with proper planning, the sale of the practice will just be the " icing on the cake", and can be ignored if it doesn't happen.
 
When I am at a dental meeting, if the topic comes up, I try to impress my younger  colleagues to fully fund their retirement plans. I am always surprised with the excuses I hear from them. When they say    that they can't afford to do so, I say to them that they can't afford not to do so. Although they may not like to hear it, I suggest that  they should forgo the new BMW or the boat until after the Keoghs and IRA's are fully funded.
 
The above takes discipline, but it can be done, and you will reap the rewards after retirement.
 
Dick Vlock, DDS
 
Date: Sun, 28 May 2000 10:30:59 -0400
From: g russell frankel <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: transition
Message-ID: <39312DA3.761F87EF@cinci.rr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


        Ormond Grimes <ogrimes@internetpro.net>

Mon 11:41 PM

 Subject:
        Re: ORTHOD-L digest 699
     To:
        orthod-l@usc.edu



Mark Lively wrote:

>Not to sound ludicrous but what if one had to finish all of their
patients and
>then close the doors.  Equipment was written off, building that they
owned could
>be leased for additional income or sold and one's savings  would be
used for
>retirement (the way it was supposed to be used).  So, what if you could

not sell
>that practice?  Would it really be the end of the world?  Are we really
that
>dependent on what we may or not sell our practices for?

My reply:

I am the other end, Mark, having practiced almost four times as long as
your ten years.  I don't own my building. I rent.  My office is in an
expensive prime spot in my town.  I have equipment that has not been
written off yet because it was bought only a few years ago.  I try to
keep my technique up to date by going to clinics, meetings, etc.  I
cannot see myself paying the overhead (rent, utilities, salaries, etc.)
I would have to pay to finish all of my patients. How can I afford to do

this when the last few patients occupy the time previously allocated for

several hundred? I do not depend on selling my practice for my
retirement.   I would like to choose and train someone who would make
the transition much easier for the patients,  and for me.  If I can get
some compensation for this, so much the better.  With graduates looking
for the big time practice, I'm afraid I may be out of the loop. My
practice is small--less than 300 K/year.  I am sort of at a loss to be
able to know how I might successfully make this transition.  I wish it
were as simple for me as it apparently is for you.  Orm

hey ormond,  they never told us at wash u. that we had such a solely
unique future problem, unlike any in any other phase of  the healing
arts.  man, it is really tough out there and a huge concern, not just
expenses but possible refunds. you can't stop taking new patients if you
want to sell or bring someone in, and if you finallydecide to quit and
not take new patients, there is not much to sell if someone would come
along.  this is not just from me but from almost all the other orthos i
talk to.  amen to your words.
rusty


Date: Tue, 30 May 2000 07:31:20 -0700
From: "William R. Hyman" <babbitecho@earthlink.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: sterilizers
Message-ID: <NDBBJDPACLLDEGBFLKKIIEFPCAAA.babbitecho@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The California Dental Board has recently changed its requirements for
sterilization procedure. It now requires bagging instruments prior to
sterilization. This would seem to require me to change from a dry heat
sterilizer to either a cemiclave or steam autoclave. Does anyone have an
opinion about the pros and cons of these options?

Date: Tue, 30 May 2000 11:04:00 EDT
From: Drted35@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Wilckodontics and more
Message-ID: <b2.5cd0efc.26653260@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Fellows of ESCO,
Go to search engine: topclick.com   and enter "wilckodontics"  and find 59
items. (Ted Rothstein :-)
Date: Tue, 30 May 2000 17:10:22 +0200
From: "jose maria feliu" <jfeliu@airtel.net>
To: <ORTHOD-L@usc.edu>
Subject: bracket design
Message-ID: <000801bfca49$2dc6f460$ce4690c1@usc.es>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0005_01BFCA59.F0C1DC40"

I´m looking for a department of Orthodontics which is interested on bracket design using finite element method.My name is Joseph Feliu from Spain.I´m doing my Masther Thesis in this issue , and I would like to contact with somebody who is working in the same topic.Please send information to: jfeliu@airtel.net.
ORTHOD-L Digest 702 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Re: sterilizers by WRed852509@cs.com 3) Re: transition by "Ron Parsons" 4) Re: ABO in Halifax by "Dr. Immanuel Gillis" Date: Fri, 02 Jun 2000 13:52:13 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000602135213.007f2920@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 9 Date: Tue, 30 May 2000 19:56:02 EDT From: WRed852509@cs.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: sterilizers Message-ID: <30.5c530a1.2665af12@cs.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hi Bill, The other option is to buy an upgraded high heat sterilizer that can handle bagging of instruments. I have read everything I can get a hold of regarding this issue because we have 7 high heat sterilizers (of the old variety) that will need to be replaced. I appears that we will receive a discount from Dentronix for our old machines, but the cost is still considerable. Additionally, the new sterilizers will not cycle as fast, nor will they hold as many instruments. The good news is that high heat is still the best for pliers. We will soon bite the bullet and buy more pliers and trade in our old sterilizers and move forward, awaiting the next costly regulatory change. Ron Redmond DDS Date: Wed, 31 May 2000 21:16:13 -0400 From: "Ron Parsons" To: "g russell frankel" Cc: Subject: Re: transition Message-ID: <01ec01bfcb66$faafef40$1668fea9@g48sy> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Rusty, I think doctors who are looking to get some value for their practice and expect to practice for 5 more years might consider OrthAlliance (Torrence,CA). You retain complete control of your practice, utilizing only the concepts you prefer to implement. For a 17% service fee, you receive 100% of the last 12 months receipts, half cash and half in a 3-yr note yielding 9.5%. After 5 years, you can walk away if you wish. This is a "transition" scenario I sent to Ormand: Find an orthodontist in your area who is willing to join OrthAlliance. Include your practice in the deal. OrthAlliance will pay the orthodontist you locate one year's gross, 50% cash and 50% as a 3-yr note yielding 9.5%. The orthodontist can just pay the money to you as you walk away. He, in turn, gets the full 100% for his practice and then continues to work at his practice with your practice, as a satellite. His overhead goes up 17% but so does his income. Bottom line... you and he get cash, you walk away, and he makes a great income with an additional satellite office. Ron Parsons OrthAlliance Member ----- Original Message ----- From: g russell frankel To: Sent: Sunday, May 28, 2000 10:30 AM Subject: transition > > Ormond Grimes > > Mon 11:41 PM > > Subject: > Re: ORTHOD-L digest 699 > To: > orthod-l@usc.edu > > > > Mark Lively wrote: > > >Not to sound ludicrous but what if one had to finish all of their > patients and > >then close the doors. Equipment was written off, building that they > owned could > >be leased for additional income or sold and one's savings would be > used for > >retirement (the way it was supposed to be used). So, what if you could > > not sell > >that practice? Would it really be the end of the world? Are we really > that > >dependent on what we may or not sell our practices for? > > My reply: > > I am the other end, Mark, having practiced almost four times as long as > your ten years. I don't own my building. I rent. My office is in an > expensive prime spot in my town. I have equipment that has not been > written off yet because it was bought only a few years ago. I try to > keep my technique up to date by going to clinics, meetings, etc. I > cannot see myself paying the overhead (rent, utilities, salaries, etc.) > I would have to pay to finish all of my patients. How can I afford to do > > this when the last few patients occupy the time previously allocated for > > several hundred? I do not depend on selling my practice for my > retirement. I would like to choose and train someone who would make > the transition much easier for the patients, and for me. If I can get > some compensation for this, so much the better. With graduates looking > for the big time practice, I'm afraid I may be out of the loop. My > practice is small--less than 300 K/year. I am sort of at a loss to be > able to know how I might successfully make this transition. I wish it > were as simple for me as it apparently is for you. Orm > > hey ormond, they never told us at wash u. that we had such a solely > unique future problem, unlike any in any other phase of the healing > arts. man, it is really tough out there and a huge concern, not just > expenses but possible refunds. you can't stop taking new patients if you > want to sell or bring someone in, and if you finallydecide to quit and > not take new patients, there is not much to sell if someone would come > along. this is not just from me but from almost all the other orthos i > talk to. amen to your words. > rusty > > > Date: Wed, 31 May 2000 13:02:38 +0300 From: "Dr. Immanuel Gillis" To: Subject: Re: ABO in Halifax Message-ID: <001501bfcae7$5b0566c0$570c4084@win95enb> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I read and re-read the date on the e-mail but it still doesn't read April 1!!! I should probably adjust the date settings on my computer. Immanuel Gillis Jerusalem, Israel ORTHOD-L Digest 703 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 702 by "Dr. B.L. Vendittelli" Date: Tue, 06 Jun 2000 14:15:57 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000606141557.007f4c40@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 10 Date: Sat, 3 Jun 2000 08:35:07 -0700 (PDT) From: "Dr. B.L. Vendittelli" To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 702 Message-ID: <20000603153507.8397.qmail@web1105.mail.yahoo.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii In response to the OrthoAlliance scenario: Sure, the OrthoAlliance option is a valid one. Here's another scenario that will give the retiring orthodontist about the same overall income at the end, but may offer other advantages. For example let's take a practice which grosses $500,000 a year and has a %50 overhead. With the OrthoAlliance option: The orthodontist recieves $250,000 cash and a 3-year note of the same value. Overhead now goes up to 67% per year. This gives the orthodontist an income of $165,000 per year for 5 years (assuming that billings stay the same). After 5 years, the orthodontist is $1.35 million ahead and can walk away. Who will take over patients...maybe OrthoAlliance finds a new guy to come in. The other option: The retiring orthodontist finds a young and growing orthodontist in the area. He offers his practice to him for $250,000 (about 15-20 % below market value) and to stay on as an associate at 40% of billings. The retiring orthodontist gets $250,000 initially plus $200,000 income per year (assuming he still produces $500,000 of billings). Or he could decide to slow it down, hence the new orthodontists practice grows. He also receives coverage from another orthodontist, security that if he has to leave the practice sooner than 5-years that there is someone to take over his patients and to work with a young orthodontist who may invigorate his desire to practice. (i.e. more enjoyable). All said and done, the retiring orthodontist after 5-years makes way with $1.25 million (only 100,000 less that OAlliance scenario) plus other benefits as mentioned above. The young guy also wins: he buys a practice for less than market value, the security of a long-established practice and referal base and also has an orthodontist for coverage...not to mention the extra 10% left over from the paying of associates fees. The overall overhead of the practice could also be reduced, especially is the retiring orthodontist's office is gradually joined into the young orthodontist's facilities (overhead of one office as opposed to two). It appears as a win-win situation. Bruno L Vendittelli New York, NY soon to be in Toronto, Ontario > Rusty, > > I think doctors who are looking to get some value > for their practice and > expect to practice for 5 more years might consider > OrthAlliance > (Torrence,CA). You retain complete control of your > practice, utilizing only > the concepts you prefer to implement. For a 17% > service fee, you receive > 100% of the last 12 months receipts, half cash and > half in a 3-yr note > yielding 9.5%. After 5 years, you can walk away if > you wish. > > This is a "transition" scenario I sent to Ormand: > > Find an orthodontist in your area who is willing to > join OrthAlliance. > Include your practice in the deal. OrthAlliance > will pay the orthodontist > you locate one year's gross, 50% cash and 50% as a > 3-yr note yielding 9.5%. > The orthodontist can just pay the money to you as > you walk away. He, in > turn, gets the full 100% for his practice and then > continues to work at his > practice with your practice, as a satellite. His > overhead goes up 17% but > so does his income. > > Bottom line... you and he get cash, you walk away, > and he makes a great __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Yahoo! Photos -- now, 100 FREE prints! http://photos.yahoo.com
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 704

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Orthalliance option response
        by "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
  3) Enquiry
        by sighsm@wlink.com.np
  4) National Board of Orthodontics
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
  5) How safe is your computer data?
        by "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
  6) Scent free Halifax and the ABO
        by Lee Erickson <n1hssk23@pop1.ns.sympatico.ca>
  7) Digital Cameras
        by Cynthia Rosenberg <Cynthia_Rosenberg@Brown.edu>
Date: Tue, 13 Jun 2000 22:48:33 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000613224833.007fb4b0@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

11

Date: Wed, 7 Jun 2000 06:12:20 -0400
From: "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Orthalliance option response
Message-ID: <002901bfd068$ecc3e2e0$0a00a8c0@pickron.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0020_01BFD047.569ABC60"

Dr Vendittelli did a great disservice by painting a pretty picture for a retiring orthodontist.  His picture of OrthAlliance is totally incorrect also.
First, OrthAlliance is not interested in signing up retiring orthodontists.  The average age of the doctors is 47 and they are some of the most successful in the country.  Although there must an exit to any contract, it is not the main reason for joining this company.  Our exchange of ideas have allowed the doctors to grow their practices without working harder or longer.  When a young orthodontist joins OrthAlliance, experienced OrthAlliance doctors will mentor him/her as the practice grows and they have 6 full-time consultants that work in the field to help institute practice improvement programs that are proven to work.
But if you simply want to look at the 5 year senario in dollars, with the OrthAlliance program, you must add 7% minimum interest for 5 years to the $500,000 which is over $200,000 in the bank and could be more even with diversified investment vehicles.  OrthAlliance can help you find an associate and you can give him the practice, you have already been paid!!  I have a large group practice in Atlanta and I have 5 associates.  You are not going to find anyone smart to pay you $250,000 and make $50,000 coming in the door.  Where does he get the money to pay the principle and interest on $400,000.  Am I missing something here?  Most retiring orthodontists have practices in areas of declining school age populations and are treating a select population that cannot be sustained by a young orthodontist without help.  what are you going to do that you haven't done already that will make up the diference for him.  Where does the help come from as you retire?   I don't see anything in your senario that is even near the value offered by OrthAlliance.  Check your numbers and your potential associates and then call OrthAlliance.
Robert "Pete" Pickron
I am a founder of OrthAlliance and have a vested interest.
Date: Thu, 08 Jun 2000 09:04:55 +0530
From: sighsm@wlink.com.np
To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
Subject: Enquiry
Message-ID: <393F145F.415B@wlink.com.np>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-2
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Anyone having the information about the progessive Orthodontic Seminar
Progamme(POS).....?.They have also the website-www.posortho.com.Someone
is interested to run this trainning for the general dental practioners
in Nepal.I want to know how worth and ellgible it is.Any information
will be highly appreciated.
        Dr.Shambhu Man Singh.

Date: Fri, 9 Jun 2000 23:38:30 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: National Board of Orthodontics
Message-ID: <00b901bfd28d$59731840$7d0dd6d1@pavilion>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_00B6_01BFD26B.D16739C0"

Dear ESCO
 
If an orthodontist was not going to be certified by the ABO, is there any risk being certified by the NBO.  The premise is that they are trying to mimic the rest of the medical profession.  So the question is if you know that you are not going to take the ABO, then why not take the NBO?
 
Roy King
Jupiter,Fla
Date: Fri, 09 Jun 2000 22:35:59 -0700
From: "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
To: "orthod-l@usc.edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: How safe is your computer data?
Message-ID: <3941D3BF.F926721F@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I just read an article about some victims of the Los Alamos wildfire
disaster -- post-graduate students who lost three years of computer data
when their offices in field trailers burned up, setting back their
career plans.  This sort of thing happens over and over -- people using
computers take for granted the safety of the data in those machines, but
when disaster strikes, they discover how vulnerable they were.  Not long
ago I heard of an orthodontist in my area who lost all of his computer
data when his office burned.  He had his staff religiously make backup
tapes, but left them in the office routinely!  It's not rocket science.
Make backups, not all on the same removable media but rather on a
rotating batch of them.  Take the backup tapes or disks off-site.
Always verify the backups by reading them back and comparing with the
hard disk. (A good backup program should do that automatically, but you
may need to turn on that option.) Better yet, have a spare computer off
site and read the backup into that computer.  This keeps a spare
computer up to date for use at a moment's notice and it verifies that
the backup is readable by another computer. Even if you have a service
contract, the service people can't recreate your data from smoke.
Assume the worst, but prepare for it, too.  I've used my own computers
since the late 1970's and have seen that everything that can go wrong
eventually will go wrong:  hard disks fail, backup drives fail,
computers write faulty data, backup tapes can't be read back into the
computer when needed, power supplies fail and fry the computer circuits,
the backup disks were left in the direct sun and warped, etc., etc.

Just thought this would be a good time to remind everyone to back up
your data often, verify that the backup is useable, and take the data
off-site for safety.

Happy computing,

Stan Sokolow, DDS
overbyte@earthlink.net



Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 23:02:07 -0300
From: Lee Erickson <n1hssk23@pop1.ns.sympatico.ca>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Scent free Halifax and the ABO
Message-ID: <3945961F.415@pop1.ns.sympatico.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Colleagues:
Don't let the media scare you away from attending the ABO in Halifax.
The "scent police" are not as pervasive as the media would have you
believe. I smell great and still wear deoderant....We are just
particular of the type of scent. Our #1 favorite is "Eau de Lobster".
Look forward to seeing you in Halifax.
Lee Erickson

Date: Tue, 13 Jun 2000 23:00:30 -0400
From: Cynthia Rosenberg <Cynthia_Rosenberg@Brown.edu>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Digital Cameras
Message-ID: <v04011703b56ca4b07bb8@[128.148.44.237]>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Does anyone have any experience or thoughts to share about the Sony DSC
D770 digital camera as compared to the Fuji MX2900?  Washington Scientific
Camera Co. sells a nice, complete Sony package.  Other than Dolphin, I'm
not sure who else is selling the Fuji with a ring flash.

Thanks,

Cynthia Rosenberg
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 705

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics June 2000,
 Vol. 117, No. 6
        by "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
  3) Digital Camcorders
        by "B. Ellingson" <bellin@uslink.net>
  4) I need E-Mail
        by "Alvaro Sazo Rodriguez" <sazodent@entelchile.net>
Date: Fri, 16 Jun 2000 12:54:21 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000616125421.00801750@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

12


Date: Tue, 13 Jun 2000 09:37:35 -0500
From: "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
To: ajodo_toc@mosby.com
Subject: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics June 2000,
 Vol. 117, No. 6
Message-ID: <3946472F.89197FC2@mosby.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Table of Contents for June 2000, Vol. 117, No. 6
http://www.mosby.com/ajodo
--------------------------------------------------------------
Editorial

Online AJO/DO becomes a member benefit
David L. Turpin, DDS, MSD, Editor-in-Chief
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1176629

Original Articles

Evaluation of profile esthetic change with mandibular advancement
surgery
Andrew D. Shelly, DDS, MS, Thomas E. Southard, DDS, MS, Karin A.
Southard, DDS, MS, John S. Casko, DDS, MS, PhD, Jane R. Jakobsen, BS,
MA, Kirk L. Fridrich, DDS, MS, John L. Mergen, DDS, MS
Iowa City, Iowa
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a99139

A comparative study of skeletal and dental stability between rigid and
wire fixation for mandibular advancement
Stephen D. Keeling, DDS, MS, Calogero Dolce, DDS, PhD, Joseph E. Van
Sickels, DDS, Robert A. Bays, DDS, Gary M. Clark, PhD, John D. Rugh, PhD

Gainesville, Fla, San Antonio, Tex, and Atlanta, Ga
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103256

The genetics of human tooth agenesis: New discoveries for understanding
dental anomalies
Heleni Vastardis, DDS, DMSc
Boston, Mass
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103257

Dental age in maxillary canine ectopia
Adrian Becker, BDS, LDS, DDO, Stella Chaushu, DMD, MSc
Jerusalem, Israel
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104412

Difference in dental lateral arch length between 9-year-olds born in the
1960s and the 1980s
Rune Lindsten, DDS, Björn Ögaard, DrOdont, DDS, Erik Larsson, DrOdont,
DDS
J&ouml;nk&ouml;ping and Falk&ouml;ping, Sweden, and Oslo, Norway
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104413

Sagittal changes after maxillary protraction with expansion in Class III
patients in the primary, mixed, and late mixed dentitions: A
longitudinal retrospective study
Marc Saadia, DDS, MS, Edgar Torres, DDS
Mexico City, Mexico
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103773

Craniofacial morphology in orthodontically treated patients of Class III
malocclusion with stable and unstable treatment outcomes
Khatoon Tahmina, BDS, MPh, Eiji Tanaka, DDS, PhD, Kazuo Tanne, DDS, PhD
Hiroshima, Japan
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103254

Treatment effects of simple fixed appliance and reverse headgear in
correction of anterior crossbites
Yan Gu, BDS, A. Bakr M. Rabie, BDS, CertOrtho, MS, PhD, Urban Hgg, DDS,
OdontDr
Hong Kong
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104410

Evaluation of the vertical holding appliance in treatment of high-angle
patients
Marc DeBerardinis, DMD, MS, Tony Stretesky, DDS, Pramod Sinha, DDS, BDS,
MS, Ram S. Nanda, DDS, MS, PhD
Oklahoma City, Okla
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105128

The effects of chronic absence of active nasal respiration on the growth
of the skull: A pilot study
Willis L. Schlenker, DDS, MS, Bryan D. Jennings, DDS, MS, M. Toufic
Jeiroudi, DDS, MS, Joseph M. Caruso, DDS, MS, MPH
Loma Linda, Calif
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a98934

Seven parameters describing anteroposterior jaw relationships:
Postpubertal prediction accuracy and interchangeability
Hiroyuki Ishikawa, DDS, PhD, Shinji Nakamura, DDS, PhD, Hiroshi Iwasaki,
DDS, PhD, Shinichi Kitazawa, DDS
Sapporo, Japan
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a99140

Case Reports

Nonextraction treatment of a high-angle Class II malocclusion: A case
report
Aldo Giancotti, DDS, MS
Rome, Italy
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a97246

Treatment of a Class II Division 1 malocclusion with a severe unilateral
lingual crossbite with combined orthodontic/orthognathic surgery
Steven L. Cureton, DMD, MS, Ronald Bice, DMD, MS, James Strider, DDS
Johnson City, Tenn
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a100078

Continuing Education

Questions and registration forms
Zane Muhl, DDS, MS, PhD, Editor
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176ce

Ortho Bytes

Advanced PowerPoint animation techniques: Part I
Demetrios Halazonetis, DMD, MS
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108383

Litigation, Legislation, and Ethics

D=IEL
Laurance Jerrold, DDS, JD
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1176711

Department of Reviews and Abstracts

Facial esthetics in borderline extraction and nonextraction patients
N. Nalchajian
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176bk

Factors associated with apical root resorption in orthodontically
treated patient studied by a case control method
J. H. Ahn, A. Baumrind, R. L. Boyd
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176bk2

Construction, development and error analysis of a stereocephalometric
radiograph system
R. Gallagher
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176bk3

Using liposomes to target drugs to molecules of the periodontal membrane

T. Tong
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176bk4

Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations

The American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies,
the American Board of Orthodontists, the American Association of
Orthodontists Foundation Board of Directors, and the College of
Diplomates of the American Board of Orthodontics
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176dr

Correction

Follow-up on distraction osteogenesis in the mandible. El Bialy
2000:117(4);26A.
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176cr

Reader's Services

Editorial Board
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176eb

Information for readers
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176ir

Information for authors

Availability of journal back issues
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176aj

Bound volumes available to subscribers
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176bv

AAO Continuing education
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176ce

AAO Meeting calendar
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001176mc

_______________________________________________________________________
Copyright (c) 2000 by Mosby, Inc.
INFORMATION FOR READERS:
To order a subscription call 1-800-453-4350 or visit us at
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?db=home&id=od.
TO REMOVE YOURSELF FROM THIS LIST:
Go to http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=etoc&id=od and
enter your email address in the appropriate box.
You can also unsubscribe by sending a message to majordomo@mosby.com
with the words "unsubscribe ajodo_toc" as the body of the message.

Date: Thu, 15 Jun 2000 21:44:52 -0500
From: "B. Ellingson" <bellin@uslink.net>
To: "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Digital Camcorders
Message-ID: <003801bfd73c$d9f9ce60$0101a8c0@pavilion>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0035_01BFD712.F0499300"

ESCO members,
Dr. Rosenberg recently asked about digital cameras.  I have a question about digital camcorders.  Has any one used them in orthodontic applications for their photo taking ability?  The Panasonic PV-DV910 for example can take 750 still photos on a 60 min tape.  It has an 18x optical zoom and 300x digital zoom.  From what I've seen they can get very clear pictures, very close up, in low light.  With index search so you can find your pictures and book mark so you can remove and replace partially used film and continue to add to it.These images can be saved on the computer and printed out or printed out on the digital photo printer.  There seem to be several good, uncomplicated, rather inexpensive models to chose from.  Just a thought.  Forgive me if this has already been discussed, I haven't been paying close attention lately.
 
Ben Ellingson DDS MSD
Date: Mon, 12 Jun 2000 04:38:10 -0400
From: "Alvaro Sazo Rodriguez" <sazodent@entelchile.net>
To: <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: I need E-Mail
Message-ID: <000801bfd449$8bd5a9c0$b54754ce@default>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0005_01BFD428.03206BE0"

Please, I´m a Chilean Dentist Orthodontic, and I need To know the electronic adress
of Dr. Richard P. MacLaughlin.
Thanks
 
Dr. Alvaro Sazo R.   sazodent@entelchile.net
 

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 706

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: National Board of Orthodontics
        by YURFEST@aol.com
  3) traumatized centrals, osteodistraction, practice transition,
 patient termination
        by Scott Smoron <smoronsg@SLU.EDU>
  4) asymmetrical extraction
        by elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
  5) Mounting Cases
        by "James M Faulkner" <jmfaulkner@lamere.net>
  6) Shrinking Tonsils without Tonsillectomy -- New Technique
        by "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
  7) RV: bracket design
        by "jose maria feliu" <jfeliu@airtel.net>
  8) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
  9) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000 22:30:01 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000620223001.007aede0@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

13


Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 13:27:30 EDT
From: YURFEST@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: National Board of Orthodontics
Message-ID: <20.763556c.267d0f02@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

By taking the NBO instead of the ABO, what are you trying to prove, and whom
are you tring to fool? If the ABO is the highest standard, what is the NBO?
Paul Yurfest, Atlanta,GA
Date: Sat, 17 Jun 2000 17:03:27 -0500
From: Scott Smoron <smoronsg@SLU.EDU>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: traumatized centrals, osteodistraction, practice transition,
 patient termination
Message-ID: <000b01bfd8a7$de03eb00$966e86a5@slu.edu>
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

hello,

i just caught up on 20 or so ESCO and so my comments will ramble through
topics...
and please, I invite comments on the following...

first, to hit clinical stuff first and continuing the thread on avulsed
centrals...I am treating a patient w/ two centrals that were traumatized and
the patient would work well as a upper premolar extraction case...if the
upper centrals were questionable and you knew you had to take out two upper
teeth, would that sway anyone towards extracting the centrals rather than
risk taking out two premolars and then risking the loss of the centrals...

second, regarding missing mandibular 5s (2nd premolars ) and ankylosing
Es...has anyone out there done a vertical osteodistraction in the premolar
region to augment the bone for implants a few years down the road...I saw
this done for the anterior mandible at the AAO Meeting in Chicago using a
tooth-borne distraction device that was ligated to the cortical bone and
then slowly distracted the bone vertically to create bone for implants...it
looks like a better bone augmentation approach than a graft...

third, as a resident closing in on graduation...Ortho Cntr of America offers
$85k and $115k as a starting point for the first two years...that would mean
the standing offer is currently $100k a year for a warm body with an
Orthodontic degree...and by the way, every practitioner out there I know
thinks this is a bad deal in the long run, so you do the math...
also, I often talk to our instructors (Saint Louis U has about 20-25
part-time clinical instructors and others who teach) about this...my
metaphor is to imagine how cheaply you, as a hiring orthodontist, could put
me in a satellite office...well, that's how much it would cost me, plus I
could delay paying for anything for a year because every dealer will give me
a sweetheart deal...why would I pay one year gross for your practice?? or
even net??
lastly, there are more retirees than graduates and that means this is a
buyers' market...

fourth, along the same lines as above, despite some of what I am reading, I
don't personally foresee an actual shortage of orthodontists (except for
full-time academic roles) because most residents now see 250-300 starts a
year (grossing $750k plus) as average to small...we may be wrong, but its
our perception...OCA promotes that its practices start, on average, 450
patients per orthodontist, I believe...so what do you guys think, because if
there are fewer of us and our practices are not larger than those in the
past, we are heading for a shortage...

fifth, along the lines of dropping a patient...if the patient is a minor,
then they are a third party beneficiary to the deal and the fact that the
paying party broke their contract with you does not let you off the hook
with the third party beneficiary...that's what several lawyers I know tell
me...in addition, if the minor is paying, they still cannot be held
responsible for the contract, however you can be held responsible to your
part of the deal...these are basics of contract law, to my knowledge...

again, I invite personal remarks to smoronsg@slu.edu

Date: Sun, 18 Jun 2000 10:35:24 -0400 (EDT)
From: elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: asymmetrical extraction
Message-ID: <384569018.961338924631.JavaMail.root@web303-mc.mail.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

dear ESCO members,
i'm preparing a presentation about asymmetry in orthodontics, i'm trying to
talk about asymmetrical extraction: indication and diagnosis, biomecanics in
different techniques (tweed, ricketts, edgewise standard, ........),tips...
anybody can help me please.(thoughts, tips, articles, ref....)

Elie Amm, DDS, 2nd year resident.
departement of orthodontics
school of dental medecine
saint joseph university
Beirut, LEBANON.

______________________________________________
FREE Personalized Email at Mail.com
Sign up at http://www.mail.com/?sr=signup

Date: Mon, 19 Jun 2000 21:47:21 -0400
From: "James M Faulkner" <jmfaulkner@lamere.net>
To: "Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Cc: "Lisa Peter Howard" <lphoward@ime.net>
Subject: Mounting Cases
Message-ID: <01bfda59$7977c4a0$28da583f@jim-pc>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_006B_01BFDA37.F26624A0"

Dear Club Members,
 
  At the risk of being ostracized for ignorance, I have a basic question to float around. Why would you routinely articulate your study models? I know orthodontists that routinely mount all their cases, but get a foggy answer why.  We know that occasionally there is difference between CO and CR and know that this knowledge may affect our treatment plan  But my question deals with all the other times. For your information I am board certified and have been in practice for 18 years. I am wondering if I am missing something.
 
Cheerio
Jim Faulkner
 Kennebunkport, Maine  (home of the REAL PRESIDENTS- note the "s")
 
 
Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000 06:43:12 -0700
From: "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
To: "orthod-l@usc.edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Shrinking Tonsils without Tonsillectomy -- New Technique
Message-ID: <394F74EF.57BE8085@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

If you believe, as I do, that enlarged tonsils and adenoids have an
adverse effect on the posture of the tongue and mandible, especially if
nasal breathing is compromised, then this item found on the Internet
will be interesting.  It describes a way that surgeons can use to shrink
hypertrophic tonsils without removing them.  A radiofrequency
heat-generating probe (I think one brand has been called a "Hyfrecator")
is inserted into the tonsil and small amounts of heat are generated.
The killed tissue shrinks as it heals, thus shrinking the tonsil to a
more normal size.  It's a new application of an old device.  Since it is
quick, safe to do "in the chair" instead of in the hospital, and has
less risk than excisional tonsillectomy, it holds promise for a way that
oral surgeons can help us deal with those patients that have
malocclusions secondary to hypertrophic tonsils.
Read about it at:

http://www.ivanhoe.com/docs/thisweekonly/shrinkingtonsilsqa.html

Stan Sokolow, DDS
overbyte@earthlink.net

Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000 16:11:16 +0200
From: "jose maria feliu" <jfeliu@airtel.net>
To: <ORTHOD-L@usc.edu>
Subject: RV: bracket design
Message-ID: <002801bfdac1$667bdcc0$ce4690c1@usc.es>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0025_01BFDAD2.298F2EA0"

 
----- Original Message -----
From: jose maria feliu
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Sent: Tuesday, May 30, 2000 5:10 PM
Subject: bracket design

I´m looking for a department of Orthodontics which is interested on bracket design using finite element method.My name is Joseph Feliu from Spain.I´m doing my Masther Thesis in this issue , and I would like to contact with somebody who is working in the same topic.Please send information to: jfeliu@airtel.net.
Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000 08:45:14 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Message-ID: <200006201545.IAA21555@p4.webshots.com>

Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/2408255DOtXGtGHyE

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
         
                   
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now


Date: Tue, 20 Jun 2000 08:47:01 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Message-ID: <200006201547.IAA09572@p5.webshots.com>

Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/1905070zOLPIbxiMy

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
         
                   
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 707

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Mounting Cases
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  3) information
        by "CARRILLO IREGUI" <infoban@norma.net>
  4) Shrinking tonsils with "hyfrecator"
        by Drted35@aol.com
  5) OCA for new graduates
        by Mbellard@aol.com
  6) Scott Smoron's thoughts on buying a practice
        by "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
  7) OCA, practice values + sizes
        by Scott Smoron <smoronsg@SLU.EDU>
  8) Mounting Cases
        by Bob Frantz <login@best.com>
  9) flashlight-type orthodontic operatory lights
        by "Dietmar Kennel" <Pediatric.Dentist@usa.net>
 10) Materials for Curing Light
        by "jun" <j-1@ijk.com>
 11) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
 12) contact with fellow orthodontists from rome university
        by "d\"r aryeh eshkol" <earyeh@bezeqint.net>
 13) Digital radiography
        by LucasE@aol.com
Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 00:03:53 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000626000353.00819d50@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

14

Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2000 05:58:59 -0400
From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
To: "James M Faulkner" <jmfaulkner@lamere.net>
Cc: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Mounting Cases
Message-ID: <00a001bfdc30$7deba780$1458fea9@g48sy>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_009D_01BFDC0E.F5BE3740"

Why mount models? ... Sales & Marketing.  Why take models?  ... Sales & Marketing. 
 
Ron Parsons
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: James M Faulkner
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Cc: Lisa Peter Howard
Sent: Monday, June 19, 2000 9:47 PM
Subject: Mounting Cases

Dear Club Members,
 
  At the risk of being ostracized for ignorance, I have a basic question to float around. Why would you routinely articulate your study models? I know orthodontists that routinely mount all their cases, but get a foggy answer why.  We know that occasionally there is difference between CO and CR and know that this knowledge may affect our treatment plan  But my question deals with all the other times. For your information I am board certified and have been in practice for 18 years. I am wondering if I am missing something.
 
Cheerio
Jim Faulkner
 Kennebunkport, Maine  (home of the REAL PRESIDENTS- note the "s")
 
 
Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2000 10:33:39 -0500
From: "CARRILLO IREGUI" <infoban@norma.net>
To: <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: information
Message-ID: <000701bfdb96$15a25240$532540d1@infoban>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0004_01BFDB6C.29EB4A60"

i need some help.I need to know some formation about where can i study or take some courses in lingual orthodontics,
thanks.
hebert
Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2000 13:03:02 EDT
From: Drted35@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Shrinking tonsils with "hyfrecator"
Message-ID: <54.583d4f5.26824f46@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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Dear Colleagues
    This procedure is being touted for snoring. It also "shrinks" the palate
and ENT docs started pushing it about 2 years ago. I had this procedure done
to help me reduce a snoring problem..  I annotated in toto the procedure on
my website at drted.com. You can even see the progress chart I made with my
snoring problem..
At the home page click on the link "somnoplasty to eliminate snoring" at the
bottom of the page.  Cordially, Ted :-)
Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2000 23:11:25 EDT
From: Mbellard@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: OCA for new graduates
Message-ID: <a6.60563cc.2682dddd@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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dear smoronsg,

I read your post on esco about OCA, etc, and felt compelled to respond. I am
an independent, solo, private practitioner, 45 year old male, 16 years out of
ortho residency. It concerns me that so many residents are considering OCA or
other mso's as a viable entry vehicle into private practice.  it strikes me
from my perspective as being short sighted.  Yes, the starting salary is
tempting.  I would have been tempted, too.  Perhaps like you, I was in
substantial debt when I finished school.  I bought a practice for a year's
gross, and had a few lean years as I paid my debts and my practice note. 
More importantly though, I steadily turned the practice into what I always
wanted.  Now I have a large, state of the art practice with an income I
wouldn't have imagined when I was in school.  I am not tethered to a
"management" company.  Rather, I can hire consultants as I feel needed, and
have no strings attached.  My practice is just that, with 50+% going into my
family's pocket every year.
If you guys would look beyond the first few years, you will realize, as many
consultants have astutely pointed out, that you will earn substantially less
over your practice lifetime affiliated with an mso. Why do that? It defies
logic.  Sure, the first few years are easier. But aren't you gutsy enough to
venture out on your own and call your own shots?  I believe that you will
become very weary of paying the "management" fee after a while, realizing
that you are the one busting your behind every day to please patients and
parents and keeping staff happy. Don't think for a minute that OCA deals with
and solves your staff management problems for you.  The concept of coming to
work every day and only treating patients, leaving management to OCA, is
wishful thinking, in spite of what their recruiters may say.
This is a great profession, and I hate to think of it turning into what
optometry has become.  Corporate America sees orthodontics as a profit
center, understandably so,  and OCA is looking for young residents to make
money for them.  That's not why I went to school. How about you?
 
Mark Bellard
Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2000 20:41:04 -0700
From: "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
To: "orthod-l@usc.edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Cc: smoronsg@SLU.EDU
Subject: Scott Smoron's thoughts on buying a practice
Message-ID: <39518AD0.B674A830@earthlink.net>
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Dear Scott:
    On June 17, you wrote to the mailing list some thoughts as a senior
orthodontic resident nearing graduation.  You asked "Why would I pay one
year gross for (a) practice?? or even net?? . . . Lastly, there are more
retirees than graduates and that means this is a buyers' market."  You
went on to explain that "Orthodontic Centers of America (OCA) offers
$85k to $115k as a starting point for two years ..."
    As an orthodontist 28 years in private practice, approaching
retirement, I offer some counter-thoughts.
    I looked into OCA several years ago.  The starting salary is not
truly a salary.  Rather, OCA guarantees that you'll be paid that amount,
but during the ramp-up of a new practice, your practice will be in
negative cash flow.  OCA loans the practice the money it needs to get
going:  construction, equipment, supplies, salaries, advertising, and
your personal salary, . . . to cover the negative cash flow.  The
practice accrues interest debt to OCA on the loan balance.  OCA shows
you spreadsheet projections that make certain assumptions, albeit based
upon experience from other practices they started, but still they are
projections and estimates.  Your mileage will vary.  If you start so
many cases per year, you'll ramp up so fast, reach positive cash flow in
month "X", and start paying back the loan to OCA.  Meanwhile, OCA is
sharing the practice income with you, since they "own" half of the
practice, and you pay them a fee for their services to the practice.
The contract is non-cancellable by you except if OCA fails to perform
(but by what criteria, and would you be in a position to take OCA to
court to enforce your disappointment with their performance, would they
say it's your fault that the practice didn't meet the projections?).
Study that contract and get competent advice.
    Okay, so you weather the ramp-up period.  Now you are working an
established practice that is bleeding out cash to OCA to pay for its
corporate profits (remember the stockholders expect return on
investment) and for corporate salaries and limos, etc.  Who controls
those expenditures?  OCA has a 20-year locked-in contract with the
practice, with an option to renew for 20 more years.  That's surely
longer than you'd want to be working, so basically, this is indentured
servitude.  Maybe you'd be better off with a Big Brother running your
show because you don't want to manage your own office or don't think you
can do it, but most of us went into dentistry to be our own boss, not to
be a cog in a wheel.  And remember, OCA isn't in that office, dealing
with the staff as people, dealing with the patients, doing the treatment
-- it's you.  They'll help you because they want the office to succeed,
but you're still the one where the buck stops.
    If you buy a small practice by your scale, say one grossing $500k,
well run, with an existing well-trained staff in place, all knowing
their jobs and working like a machine, you can have an overhead in the
50% to 55% range, more or less.  Let's say 55%.  You net 45%.  That's
$225k net to you, before debt service.  Let's say you draw $115k per
year, as you say that OCA offers.  That leaves $110k per year for debt
service.  If you pay the seller $350k for his practice and finance it
all, how long would it take you to pay off the loan?  I don't know the
current loan rates and I don't want to take the time to be precise on
the estimate, but my spreadsheet says you'll pay it off in about 3 years
9 months at 12% per annum paying $110k per year.  You can do the math.
    At that point, you'll own 100% of the practice.  If you want a
practice management consultant to help you, you can hire one for just
those services you feel you need.  You can fire them, shop around for a
better service, do without them, whatever.  It's your show.  Moreover,
you aren't paying for the lease on the corporate headquarters and the
corporate salaries and perqs and the shareholder dividends.  As you
said, there are lots of orthodontic suppliers competing for your
business and you can get good deals without OCA.  Moreover, supplies are
only a small part of your overhead.
    Meanwhile, you are building your practice on top of the one you
bought.  You can do almost anything that OCA can do for you, without the
hooks attached.  Besides, the best practice builder is your personal
contact with people, especially your referrers or potential referrers.
OCA can't do that for you.  Any techniques they have, you can do, too.
    When nearby older orthodontists with shrinking practices decide to
retire, you can buy one as a satellite, already in positive cash flow.
Pay a reasonable price.  Maybe even pick up a bargain.  I've seen some
advertised.  You can be the consolidator, instead of OCA.
    Sure, you can go the route of OCA and its like, but don't disregard
the advantages of taking over a private practice already running,
without a ramp-up, with a trained staff, systems in place, a workable
office space, a recall pool, prior patients who bring their kids in and
refer their friends, good relations with referring doctors, etc.  You
can gradually remake the old practice to your own desires, updating
equipment and redecorating, while you earn an income.  And it will be
100% yours, and you call all of the shots.
    And OCA isn't all that smart.  One OCA office I visited was using a
kitchen counter-top convection oven as a substitute for an FDA-approved
sterilizer.   Who would take the blame on that when a malpractice
lawsuit hits over an alleged cross-contamination infection?   That's
right, the doctor with the license, not OCA.  Another was designed with
the sterilization station way in the back of the office, making the
assistants walk the length of the office to recycle instruments after
each patient visit, whereas the x-ray and darkroom were centrally
located to the operatory although they are only needed a few times per
case.  Where is the expertise that office layout?
    Final thought:  I don't think you're right that there are more
retirees than graduates, not yet.  The boomer bulge will reach
retirement age soon, but many orthodontists like to continue working
longer than you may imagine.  When they finally are retiring in greater
numbers than new graduates emerge, who'll take over the patients of the
practices that don't sell?  Practices will consolidate, or disintegrate
and the neighboring offices will pick up the patients.  There will be
fewer practices, but they'll be bigger.  Get ready.  Get a practice.
You can succeed.  You know it.  Do it.

Stan Sokolow, DDS
overbyte@earthlink.net

Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2000 23:00:59 -0500
From: Scott Smoron <smoronsg@SLU.EDU>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: OCA, practice values + sizes
Message-ID: <001301bfdbfe$7a23b5c0$8b6e86a5@slu.edu>
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hello again,

i thought i would clarify three things about my previous posting...

1)  i am NOT considering OCA...i appreciate the advice, but a monkey could
figure out that OCA is not the way to go (apologies to all those associated
with OCA, but capital is not in short supply for orthodontic graduates)
2)  i base my assertion about practice size of 250-300 patients as medium to
small based upon discussions with faculty and private practitioners...the
ones doing less than 250 consider themselves not at full capacity but they
are STILL QUITE SUCCESSFUL...i want to iterate that size of practice should
be a function of practice philosophy, not the basis of measuring one's
success...
3)  my comments on practice values can be further explained...if fair market
value of the practice is one year gross, then in a buyer's market the value
decreases...and i know people who have been looking for a purchaser for
years...and others who have no problem...

by the way, i appreciate the great responses....but i'd rather not mislead
anyone into thinking that i would even contemplate OCA...i get enough junk
mail as it is...

scott smoron

Date: Wed, 21 Jun 2000 22:53:15 -0700
From: Bob Frantz <login@best.com>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: Mounting Cases
Message-ID: <3951A9CB.4D2E2397@best.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
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Jim,
I find that after mounting all cases there is no other time, that is, I
am unable to determine by looking in the mouth what the type of
discrepancy is and the amount. Only by mounting casts are you able to
determine the character of the discrepancy. It may be horizontal or
vertical or both, and you cannot tell by manipulating the mandible. Most
slides that appear to be horizontal are in fact vertical problems, and
this can markedly alter your treatment.
Philosophically, I believe that mounting your cases in the best centric
relation of the day allows one to diagnose and therefore treat to a
seated condylar reference position. Doing so has helped me reduce the
amount of problem cases I have in my office.
I also found that when I tried to pick the cases to mount, often I
missed something, but when I started mounting all cases, then the amount
of information available in the study cast increased substantially.
And finally, from a purely practical standpoint, mounting cases is
quicker, easier, and less expensive than polished, white stone models
with a great deal more information available.

Bob Frantz
Danville, CA

Date: Thu, 22 Jun 2000 18:17:01 -0500
From: "Dietmar Kennel" <Pediatric.Dentist@usa.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: flashlight-type orthodontic operatory lights
Message-ID: <005101bfdc9f$fbc58580$ddd5c2d0@oemcomputer>
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I would like to get some information about "flashlight-type" orthodontic
operatory lights. Who can give me info about pricing, manufacturer,
advantages and disadvantages compared with conventional dental operatory
lights.
The following link shows an ortho office equipped with these lights
http://www.daddonastudios.com/kawa.htm

Thanks for any info!

Dietmar Kennel DDS
South Plains Pediatric Dental Group
Lubbock, Texas

www.MyPediatricDentist.com

Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 12:44:38 +0900
From: "jun" <j-1@ijk.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Materials for Curing Light
Message-ID: <001401bfdce0$b9c2ce40$0101a8c0@compaq>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="shift_jis"
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Dear Members,

I am useing curing light with Apollo 95E lite Plasma Arc.
I think that it is good. However I feal that some materials need curing time
about 6 second.
Other some materials need curing time about 1-3 second.
but I don't have information for curing time.
I want to some information for curing time for some bonding materials and
filling resin.

Jun Matsumura
Kanagawa Japan
j-1@ijk.com


Date: Fri, 23 Jun 2000 23:26:06 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Message-ID: <200006240626.XAA06403@p4.webshots.com>

Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/1781448baxlWOqoML

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
         
                   
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now


Date: Sat, 24 Jun 2000 14:23:46 +0300
From: "d\"r aryeh eshkol" <earyeh@bezeqint.net>
To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
Subject: contact with fellow orthodontists from rome university
Message-ID: <004901bfddce$b310fe20$0a4b19d4@default>
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: multipart/alternative;
 boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0046_01BFDDE7.CE8B9020"

i would like to contact  orthodontists  that works at rome university  italy
please cotact me - earyeh@bezeqint.net
aryeh eshkol
specialist in orthodontics
givataim
israel
Date: Sun, 25 Jun 2000 23:21:29 EDT
From: LucasE@aol.com
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: Digital radiography
Message-ID: <b6.6f40d97.26882639@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Does anyone have any experience with Planmeca's Dimax2 real-time digital
sensor system?  Especially integrating it with Orthotrac Imaging?
Luke Stevens
Tallahassee, FL
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 708

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Mounting Cases
        by "Mark Cordato" <markc@ix.net.au>
  3) Re: OCA for new graduates
        by MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
  4) Re: Scott Smoron's thoughts on buying a practice
        by MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
  5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 707
        by Kevin <parrothd@usmo.com>
  6) information
        by YURFEST@aol.com
  7) Nikon D-1
        by "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
  8) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 707
        by Denise Lawry <DeniseLawry@access.net.au>
  9) Re: Mounting Cases
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 10) Re: Shrinking tonsils with "hyfrecator"
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 11) Re: OCA for new graduates
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 12) Re: flashlight-type orthodontic operatory lights
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 13) Re: ORTHOD-L camcorders
        by "Darick Nordstrom" <darick@nordstromd.com>
 14) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
 15) european orthodontics
        by "Kim Jones" <kim@cyberport.net>
 16) MOUNTED MODELS
        by =?iso-8859-1?q?blair=20ADAMS?= <adams519@yahoo.com>
Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2000 20:06:07 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000630200607.007b4d60@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

15


Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 18:07:18 +1000
From: "Mark Cordato" <markc@ix.net.au>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Mounting Cases
Message-ID: <200006260803.SAA22014@mail.ix.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT

Dear James,

On 19 Jun 00, at 21:47, James M Faulkner wrote:

> Dear Club Members,
>
>   At the risk of being ostracized for ignorance, I have a basic
>   question to float around. Why would you routinely articulate your
>   study models? I know orthodontists that routinely mount all their
>   cases, but get a foggy answer why.  We know that occasionally there
>   is difference between CO and CR and know that this knowledge may
>   affect our treatment plan  But my question deals with all the other
>   times. For your information I am board certified and have been in
>   practice for 18 years. I am wondering if I am missing something.
>
> Cheerio
> Jim Faulkner
>  Kennebunkport, Maine  (home of the REAL PRESIDENTS- note the "s")
>

I know a few of the people here have been doing it for years. They
led me to start mounting models and I am thankful for their guidance.
Had I not been part of this group (ESCO) I think I would not have
changed.

Me, I've only been mounting models for a bit over a year.

The occlusion is (remarkably) more accurate regarding the overbite
and buccal relations. Models ground with a wax bite I now regard as
bordering on fictitious.

Plus it is (a little) cheaper and frees my staff up. It is easier for
the staff to get this right than model trimmer models.

You are proabably right, much of the time it makes little diference
but already I have a couple of patients where the diference from
mounting is significantly different to hand held models. I know I can
hear arguments already as to why it should make no difference. IMHO
it has made a difference.

In a decade or two I expect the publication standards for changes to
occlusion induced with orthodontics will need to be measured off
mounted models as hand held models will not have (it never has had)
adequate reliability and accuracy to measure for example the change
in molar relations in mm between pretreatment, deband and
posttreatment. This accuracy is required if a meaningful
interpretation of postreatment crowding, overbite and overjet changes
is desired.

So James, I am not saying you are wrong or your records are poor or
deficient just that for me I think there may be a better way.

Cheers,
Mark Cordato
Bathurst
markc@ix.net.au
Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 09:22:22 -0700
From: MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: OCA for new graduates
Message-ID: <3957833E.69E499BB@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Mark:

Well said !!!

Mark

--
Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@gate.net

Lively Orthodontics
Stuart,  Florida


Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 11:02:23 -0700
From: MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Scott Smoron's thoughts on buying a practice
Message-ID: <39579AAF.A7DFA991@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Stan:

Great piece.  I have been in practice now for 10 years and for the past
7 I have been in solo practice.  I bought an existing practice, will be
making my last note payment next month and do not regret it.  I paid one
years gross and it was worth it.  I started out with a great income from
day 1, was my own boss, bought into an established referral pattern, the
dentists in the area became familiar with my work immediately, I ran the
show and use consultants as needed.

I did better than the OCA salary from day one and most should be able to
beat this if they are looking to buy a practice rather than going in as
an associate.  I gave the original ortho 3 months to do aquatint me with
all patients, treatment plans, intro to dentists and familiarize myself
with remaining tx plans to remaining balances.  It worked out great and
I was an immediate owner of my own business.

I cannot imagine doing it any other way.  Starting from scratch has its
advantages(not treating someone else's patients) and disadvantages
(starving).  Going with OCA may work well for some but I cannot imagine
that a soon to be graduate would not be smart enough to examine this
from all sides.  The second year resident sounded more like a paid
solicitor for OCA.  He was totally clueless and obviously frustrated.

Do the math, you cannot lose paying someone one years gross if you
simply buy out the practice from day one.  The banks will finance part
of the purchase and the owner will usually finance the other half.
Great deal and great income from the very start.

Mark

--
Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@gate.net

Lively Orthodontics
Stuart,  Florida


Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 11:21:14 -0500
From: Kevin <parrothd@usmo.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 707
Message-ID: <395782F8.D2D4A666@usmo.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
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RE: Lingual orthodontics

Mario Paz puts on an excellent 2 or 3 day course in Beverly Hills a
couple of times a year, usually April and October.  He is very well
organized and extremely personable.  It makes for a nice long weekend
with your spouse.  You can also check out the American Lingual
Orthodontic Association (ALOA).  They have a one day annual meeting
usually immediately preceding the AAO meeting.

Kevin Walde
Washington, MO

Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 12:43:50 EDT
From: YURFEST@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: information
Message-ID: <cc.66bffe9.2688e246@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have been doing lingual since 1980 and there are no short cuts!!!! The
wires always have multiple finishing bends! I have tried all the labs for
indirect (the only way to go) and the results are always the same(poor).
The learning curve is very long: about 20 full cases.
Paul Yurfest, Atlanta
Date: Mon, 26 Jun 2000 13:05:48 -0500
From: "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
To: "ESCO Listserver (E-mail)" <orthod-l@usc.edu>,
        "ESCO Listserver (E-mail)" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Nikon D-1
Message-ID: <3B20254E881FD41199C0204C4F4F50203056@O2>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The Granddaddy of professional digital cameras,
the NIKON D-1 is now advertised at around
$4000 (down from $14000).  Can I dust off my
NIKKOR macro lens and ring flash?  Anyone
have experience with this unit?

Greg Hoeltzel
Saint Louis

Date: Tue, 27 Jun 00 12:35:38 +1000
From: Denise Lawry <DeniseLawry@access.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 707
Message-ID: <200006270233.e5R2XK413277@zed.access.net.au>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Dear Colleagues
I would be grateful if anyone could help me with a situation regarding my
clinical assistant who currently has a mixture of duties which include
chairside assistance and some reception and word processing. She has been
advised by her doctor that she requires two weeks off work because of
"tendonitis" or  repetitive strain injury. I do not believ



Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 09:03:53 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>,
        "James M Faulkner" <jmfaulkner@lamere.net>
Cc: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Mounting Cases
Message-ID: <010301bfe038$26033cc0$41e42304@dsl.gtei.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0100_01BFE016.9E52EBC0"

This is a deep philosophical question (or religious, if you prefer).  To my knowledge, there is no research to support the efficacy of *routinely* mounting models, so the motivation must be (as mentioned below) sales and marketing (implied superior technique and $$ for the guru teaching the technique)...or.....because it makes me feel good.  There *is* scientific evidence to suggest that you can equillibrate CO and CR, but whatever means...ortho, surgery, diamond, green stone, cranial suture manipulation, whatever.....but they (CO and CR) won't stay "synchronous" over time.  For all the science in the AJODO, it's amazing how many orthodontists are susceptible to dental cults.  There are cult members who believe the temporomandibular joint looks like working portion of an articulator.  You might call them "technologists".  There are others who view the temporomandibular joint as a biologic structure...complete with metabolism, variability, change over time, etc, etc.  You might consider them "biologists". 
 
Chuck Greene (of Laskin and Greene fame) suggested that we have the TMJ olympics...complete with teams and uniforms.  Each cult would field a team and compete for superiority on a *scientific basis*.  If there was a clear winner, they would be awarded the TMJ gold medal.  If there was *no* clear winner (and I suspect that would be the case), we would go back to doing what feels good and hopefully not harming patients.
 
My mentor has suggested that some orthodontists go through practice life transitions which he calls the "senile decline".  The first stage is a developing obsession with occlusion and TMD diagnosis.  This usually culminates in the second stage, which is buying a series of "5 speed" articulators and all the associated paraphernala to mount cases.  One can generally "recover" from the first two stages.  The third stage is an obsession with nutrition, complete with organic supplements, hair and fingernail analysis, in-office counseling, etc.  To his knowledge.....NOBODY has recovered from the third stage.
 
   -=Paul=-
 
Paul M. Thomas
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Ron Parsons
To: James M Faulkner
Cc: USC Orthodontic Study Club
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2000 5:58 AM
Subject: Re: Mounting Cases

Why mount models? ... Sales & Marketing.  Why take models?  ... Sales & Marketing. 
 
Ron Parsons
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: James M Faulkner
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Cc: Lisa Peter Howard
Sent: Monday, June 19, 2000 9:47 PM
Subject: Mounting Cases

Dear Club Members,
 
  At the risk of being ostracized for ignorance, I have a basic question to float around. Why would you routinely articulate your study models? I know orthodontists that routinely mount all their cases, but get a foggy answer why.  We know that occasionally there is difference between CO and CR and know that this knowledge may affect our treatment plan  But my question deals with all the other times. For your information I am board certified and have been in practice for 18 years. I am wondering if I am missing something.
 
Cheerio
Jim Faulkner
 Kennebunkport, Maine  (home of the REAL PRESIDENTS- note the "s")
 
 
Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 09:08:10 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: <Drted35@aol.com>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Shrinking tonsils with "hyfrecator"
Message-ID: <010801bfe038$bf10c180$41e42304@dsl.gtei.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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A kinder and gentler approach might be laser UPPP....assuming that the level
of obstruction has something to do with tonsils.  Generally, they are so
atrophied in adults that they're a non-issue.  I hate to think what they'd
do if the level of obstruction is determined to be the tongue. :-)

I guess I would start conservative and see if one of the plethora of
"anti-snore" appliances was effective.  There is some science out of British
Columbia on this approach for those interested in science.

   -=Paul=-

Paul M. Thomas


----- Original Message -----
From: <Drted35@aol.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2000 1:03 PM
Subject: Shrinking tonsils with "hyfrecator"


> Dear Colleagues
>     This procedure is being touted for snoring. It also "shrinks" the
palate
> and ENT docs started pushing it about 2 years ago. I had this procedure
done
> to help me reduce a snoring problem..  I annotated in toto the procedure
on
> my website at drted.com. You can even see the progress chart I made with
my
> snoring problem..
> At the home page click on the link "somnoplasty to eliminate snoring" at
the
> bottom of the page.  Cordially, Ted :-)
>

Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 09:49:44 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: <Mbellard@aol.com>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: OCA for new graduates
Message-ID: <010d01bfe03e$8d257660$41e42304@dsl.gtei.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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        charset="iso-8859-1"
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Amen!  I would suggest that the "E-myth" be mandatory reading for finishing
grads.

   -=Paul=-

Paul M. Thomas


----- Original Message -----
From: <Mbellard@aol.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, June 21, 2000 11:11 PM
Subject: OCA for new graduates


> dear smoronsg,
>
> I read your post on esco about OCA, etc, and felt compelled to respond. I
am
> an independent, solo, private practitioner, 45 year old male, 16 years out
of
> ortho residency. It concerns me that so many residents are considering OCA
or
> other mso's as a viable entry vehicle into private practice.  it strikes
me
> from my perspective as being short sighted.  Yes, the starting salary is
> tempting.  I would have been tempted, too.  Perhaps like you, I was in
> substantial debt when I finished school.  I bought a practice for a year's
> gross, and had a few lean years as I paid my debts and my practice note.
> More importantly though, I steadily turned the practice into what I always
> wanted.  Now I have a large, state of the art practice with an income I
> wouldn't have imagined when I was in school.  I am not tethered to a
> "management" company.  Rather, I can hire consultants as I feel needed,
and
> have no strings attached.  My practice is just that, with 50+% going into
my
> family's pocket every year.
> If you guys would look beyond the first few years, you will realize, as
many
> consultants have astutely pointed out, that you will earn substantially
less
> over your practice lifetime affiliated with an mso. Why do that? It defies
> logic.  Sure, the first few years are easier. But aren't you gutsy enough
to
> venture out on your own and call your own shots?  I believe that you will
> become very weary of paying the "management" fee after a while, realizing
> that you are the one busting your behind every day to please patients and
> parents and keeping staff happy. Don't think for a minute that OCA deals
with
> and solves your staff management problems for you.  The concept of coming
to
> work every day and only treating patients, leaving management to OCA, is
> wishful thinking, in spite of what their recruiters may say.
> This is a great profession, and I hate to think of it turning into what
> optometry has become.  Corporate America sees orthodontics as a profit
> center, understandably so,  and OCA is looking for young residents to make
> money for them.  That's not why I went to school. How about you?
>
> Mark Bellard
>

Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 09:54:35 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Dietmar Kennel" <Pediatric.Dentist@usa.net>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: flashlight-type orthodontic operatory lights
Message-ID: <011401bfe03f$3a8f6220$41e42304@dsl.gtei.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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        charset="iso-8859-1"
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I wouldn't recommend them.  I had them installed when I first built my
present office.  Only one remains in a consultation room.  The provide
monofocal light and are worthless for seeing the lower arch in a reclining
patient.  It's too easy to block the light source with your hands.  The
parabolic reflector on conventional lights has a purpose...and that's to
provide a light source that's uniform and hard to block with your hand(s).
I've installed conventional lights on all the units.  I found that the
double banks of fluorescents don't quite do it for eyes past age 40.
   -=Paul=-

Paul M. Thomas


----- Original Message -----
From: Dietmar Kennel <Pediatric.Dentist@usa.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, June 22, 2000 7:17 PM
Subject: flashlight-type orthodontic operatory lights


> I would like to get some information about "flashlight-type" orthodontic
> operatory lights. Who can give me info about pricing, manufacturer,
> advantages and disadvantages compared with conventional dental operatory
> lights.
> The following link shows an ortho office equipped with these lights
> http://www.daddonastudios.com/kawa.htm
>
> Thanks for any info!
>
> Dietmar Kennel DDS
> South Plains Pediatric Dental Group
> Lubbock, Texas
>
> www.MyPediatricDentist.com
>
>

Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 11:08:09 -0700
From: "Darick Nordstrom" <darick@nordstromd.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L camcorders
Message-ID: <03cc01bfe062$b4e84140$da94fea9@lars>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I tested many of these camcorders, along with most digital cameras as they
hit the streets ... bth for myself, and the sake of others that take my
courses or ask.

It is true that you can get OK picture quality, as you noticed, and can
append voice notes during the seconds that the image is frozen while the
tape continues to record, and that you can get many images on one tape.

I have a digital camcorder (Sony PC-100) and find that iti isn't too
difficult to go through the tape either (I have a SONY Vaio laptop with
i-link that fully controls this process in the camera by remote through the
program in the VAIO ... you could also use MotoD-V interface and software in
a regular computer).

BUT

1) There still won't be correct color and saturation in the images without
ideal lighting (unless you build color-corrected white LED video lights like
I have for other docs)
2) The standard is now assumed to be greater than 400 lines resolution, and
you will lose more after you crop.
3) You may get tired of downloading
4) you will need a close-up lens to be far enough away from the subject
(except full-face views)

Which means what you suggest (with a few mods) makes a great mid-treatment
records acquisition camera, and a great introduction to multimedia fun, with
less $$ outlay.

It used to be that there were very few digital cams that had a decent enough
lens to do ortho pics (100mm equiv), but lots of DV cameras did. Now there
are some exccellent choices out ther, that with few mods, will work.

I bought the SONY PC-100 because I wanted video and stills in one camera. It
has a megapixel still, that shoots through a fast Zeiss lens, and a flash
shoe and mating flash, that wih a #2 close-up, puts you far enough away from
the subject that there aren't any flash problems (unless you are doing model
pictures with a flash?). This makes for a simple off the shelf system that
also allows me to take videos of my kids and grandaughter.

If you don't need video, consider  the older olympus 200 or Nikon 950 or
Sony DSC D700L ... all of which are heavily discounted, but work well with
the close-up lens on (Olympus needs a special adaptor tube). The Sony needs
a special flash system unless you use the LED ringlite. The new generation
are even easier to use and better, and, surprisingly, not much more $$$.

darick


Date: Tue, 27 Jun 2000 23:43:08 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Message-ID: <200006280643.XAA04493@p3.webshots.com>

Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/2562057lNFMIuRHwY

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
         
                   
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now


Date: Wed, 28 Jun 2000 17:39:04 -0600
From: "Kim Jones" <kim@cyberport.net>
To: <orthod-L@usc.edu>
Subject: european orthodontics
Message-ID: <001c01bfe15a$0f68dce0$247aa8d0@default>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0015_01BFE127.C0D93DE0"

Hello from Montanan!  I am looking for a dentist/orthodontist that does European Orthodontics near me.  Can you help?  Kim Jones
kim@cyberport.net
Date: Thu, 29 Jun 2000 05:39:06 -0700 (PDT)
From: blair ADAMS <adams519@yahoo.com>
To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
Subject: MOUNTED MODELS
Message-ID: <20000629123906.5529.qmail@web901.mail.yahoo.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

This may seem a horrible, mercenary way of thinking;
when you routinely mount models it is easier & faster
than producing trimmed, soaped, polished "orthodontic"
models.
And fee guides allow a higher fee for mounted models
than for orthodontic models.
So they cost less for staff to produce & you get a
higher fee? Hmmmm... let me see.... tough decision.
And of course they do provide more information about
CR-CO. Didn't that mildly experienced Dr. Roth say
once-upon-a-time; "never believe what you see in the
mouth"?

Just a Thought
Blair Adams
Ottawa Canada

__________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get Yahoo! Mail - Free email you can access from anywhere!
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                            ORTHOD-L Digest 709

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 707
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  3) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 708
        by Denise Lawry <DeniseLawry@access.net.au>
  4) RE: european orthodontics
        by "MDLHome" <mdlively@gate.net>
  5) Re: european orthodontics
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  6) "european orthodontics"
        by weiland@email.kfunigraz.ac.at (Frank Weiland)
  7) Re: Scott Smoron's thoughts on buying a practice
        by "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
  8) RE: Mounting Cases
        by "Lester Kuperman" <lester@kupermanortho.com>
  9) Orthodontits in Buenos Aires
        by "Ana Nicolas" <anzanita@hotmail.com>
Date: Tue, 04 Jul 2000 14:58:16 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000704145816.00829a80@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

16

Date: Sat, 1 Jul 2000 01:38:54 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 707
Message-ID: <db.63db2cc.268eddee@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Denise,
I think we all face this type of problem.  Rather than try to solve the
dilemma yourself, it is probably time to contact your workman's comp carrier.
 You can do this to discuss the situation and they will give you advice and
probably suggest a clinical exam by one of their doctors.  You may be going
down the path of no return with this employee, so be careful what you say and
do.  You may also want to discuss the situation with your other employees to
determine their position on the issue.  Make sure that all your office
systems are in order: Osha, Wage and Labor, Sterilization, Duties performed
by office staff (especially BackOffice), and cash handling procedures.  It is
far better to be prepared and act, than unprepared and react.
Good Luck,
Ron Redmond
Date: Sun, 2 Jul 00 22:48:11 +1000
From: Denise Lawry <DeniseLawry@access.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 708
Message-ID: <200007021245.e62Cja421416@zed.access.net.au>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"

Dear Colleagues,
My communication of 27th June regarding a dental assistant with supposed
work-related tendonitis of the right hand and thumb was half complete,
and I apologise for the unfinished letter. As mentioned, I have a
chairside assistant who is about to claim compensation for a work related
"overuse injury". Has anyone had a staff member with this problem, or is
anyone aware of any articles in the literature regarding this situation?
I intend to fight this as I do not believe the condition is work related.
Thank you for your assistance.
Denise Lawry
Melbourne, Australia



Date: Fri, 30 Jun 2000 23:42:12 -0400
From: "MDLHome" <mdlively@gate.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: european orthodontics
Message-ID: <NDBBLFFLDLHGHJECELLHCEAHCAAA.mdlively@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0000_01BFE2EC.D0806D60"

Dear Kim:
 
When you say European Orthodontics, exactly what are you describing.  There is an ortho in my town that sells the parents on the "European Technique".  He advises them that it is used and Europe and his cutting edge.  He then delivers a bionator a few weeks later.
-----Original Message-----
From: owner-orthod-l@usc.edu [mailto:owner-orthod-l@usc.edu]On Behalf Of Kim Jones
Sent: Wednesday, June 28, 2000 7:39 PM
To: orthod-L@usc.edu
Subject: european orthodontics

Hello from Montanan!  I am looking for a dentist/orthodontist that does European Orthodontics near me.  Can you help?  Kim Jones
kim@cyberport.net

Date: Sat, 1 Jul 2000 01:47:26 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: european orthodontics
Message-ID: <c1.4aee3e1.268edfee@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello Montanan,
We all do!  There was a difference in the "old" days, but today all
orthodontists use very similar techniques.
Good Luck,
Ron Redmond
Date: Tue, 4 Jul 2000 08:06:06 +0200 (MET DST)
From: weiland@email.kfunigraz.ac.at (Frank Weiland)
To: orthod-L@usc.edu
Cc: kim@cyberport.net
Subject: "european orthodontics"
Message-ID: <200007040606.IAA29495@tom.kfunigraz.ac.at>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Dear Kim

Although I have been working as an orthodontist for the past 12 years in
Germany and Austria, I haven't got the faintest idea what  "EUROPEAN
ORTHODONTICS" is.

Kind regards

Frank Weiland DMD, PhD
Austria
Univ.-Doz. Dr. Frank Weiland
Klin.Abt. für Kieferorthopädie
Univ.Klinik für ZMK             Tel. +43 316 3852424
A-8036 GRAZ / LKH               Fax  +43 316 3854064
                               email weiland@email.kfunigraz.ac.at

Date: Sat, 1 Jul 2000 09:15:43 -0400
From: "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Scott Smoron's thoughts on buying a practice
Message-ID: <005d01bfe363$c7dbc700$0a00a8c0@pickron.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
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  Mark,
You are the exception and not the rule, and you did not move to a
metropolitan area.  And you did not build out a new office to start.  The
silent majority out there are having a hard time getting started, not only
do they struggle in getting a good lease, getting a good buildout, and
marketing themselves, but they need mentoring.  They have no money and very
little experience.  Orthodontics is so good that you can fail and still
partially succeed.  That doesn't mean that you do as well.  MSO's and
especially OrthAlliance give the new graduate a wealth of resources that are
not available otherwise.  And OrthAlliance is an group of independent
orthodontists that have joined together to help each other grow, whatever
the goals of the individual orthodontist. Check out the differences.
Robert Pickron - Member of OrthoAlliance
----- Original Message -----
From: "MDLoffice" <mdlively@gate.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2000 2:02 PM
Subject: Re: Scott Smoron's thoughts on buying a practice


> Dear Stan:
>
> Great piece.  I have been in practice now for 10 years and for the past
> 7 I have been in solo practice.  I bought an existing practice, will be
> making my last note payment next month and do not regret it.  I paid one
> years gross and it was worth it.  I started out with a great income from
> day 1, was my own boss, bought into an established referral pattern, the
> dentists in the area became familiar with my work immediately, I ran the
> show and use consultants as needed.
>
> I did better than the OCA salary from day one and most should be able to
> beat this if they are looking to buy a practice rather than going in as
> an associate.  I gave the original ortho 3 months to do aquatint me with
> all patients, treatment plans, intro to dentists and familiarize myself
> with remaining tx plans to remaining balances.  It worked out great and
> I was an immediate owner of my own business.
>
> I cannot imagine doing it any other way.  Starting from scratch has its
> advantages(not treating someone else's patients) and disadvantages
> (starving).  Going with OCA may work well for some but I cannot imagine
> that a soon to be graduate would not be smart enough to examine this
> from all sides.  The second year resident sounded more like a paid
> solicitor for OCA.  He was totally clueless and obviously frustrated.
>
> Do the math, you cannot lose paying someone one years gross if you
> simply buy out the practice from day one.  The banks will finance part
> of the purchase and the owner will usually finance the other half.
> Great deal and great income from the very start.
>
> Mark
>
> --
> Mark David Lively, DMD
> mdlively@gate.net
>
> Lively Orthodontics
> Stuart,  Florida
>
>
>

Date: Sat, 1 Jul 2000 16:00:31 -0500
From: "Lester Kuperman" <lester@kupermanortho.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: Mounting Cases
Message-ID: <NEBBKHNOILKKCNIEACFFOEJLDBAA.lester@kupermanortho.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

A little knowledge is dangerous!  Unfortunately, I know a little about a
lot.  Readers beware!

After 22 years of experience using a Quint laminagraph, I have read and
listened to various opinions questioning the validity of TMJ tomos.  My
experience with these films has been excellent especially when used and
interpreted correctly while realizing their limitations...as any other
diagnostic tool.   I've also taken numerous, but certainly not all,
occlusion and TMD courses over the years.  I am a proud owner of two
articulator systems----which adorn my lab shelving most of the time.  Please
don't take me lightly since I own 3 & 4 articulators of each system along
with the variators and other devices.  We do occasionally use mounted models
when deemed appropriate--such as open bites and surgical cases.

As a result of the above, I have more questions than answers.

The real question and dilemma is who can scientifically define and document
the TRUE CENTRIC RELATIONSHIP?  What is Centric Relation?  It was different
for the earlier gnathologists than most currently held beliefs.  Is it
possible that centric relation might be the wrong position for SOME finished
cases?  Perhaps, centric occlusion is best for that particular patient. Is
there true data that supports any of the myriad of mandibular manipulation
and mounting techniques?  Are there studies that demonstrate accurately and
without bias what the actual condyle position is for any given manipulation
technique?  How can the techniques all be different and correct at the same
time?  If one religiously mounts their cases, does that mean they are saying
a prayer that the condylar position is correct?  Has anyone ever verified
the condylar position radiographically for a their definition of centric
relation?  Or is this highly significant subject being addressed anecdotally
by our authorities and leaders?  (I suppose we could ask similar questions
about amalgam.)

What about growth?  What is the normal condyle-fossa relationship in a
growing child--or adolescent?  When is the joint fully formed?  What changes
in joint morphology occur with various treatment modalities?  Do we have the
mechanics to fully treat to our perceived mounted-models-treatment-plans in
a realistic fashion for all of our patients?

When models are mounted, how do we know where the condyle really
is???????????????   And if we do, then how do we accurately duplicate the
movements of this complex joint with flat articulator sufaces?  And where is
the disc especially in clicking patients?  And how do we compensate on our
mounted models for disc displacements, perforations, and adhesions?

I believe that I know  some of the answers to these questions but would
rather hear your responses.  If any of you would be kind enough to provide
me with valid references, I would be most appreciative.

Thank you,
Lester Kuperman
Fort Worth, TX

-----Original Message-----
From: Mark Cordato [mailto:markc@ix.net.au]
Sent: Monday, June 26, 2000 3:07 AM
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Mounting Cases


Dear James,

On 19 Jun 00, at 21:47, James M Faulkner wrote:

> Dear Club Members,
>
>   At the risk of being ostracized for ignorance, I have a basic
>   question to float around. Why would you routinely articulate your
>   study models? I know orthodontists that routinely mount all their
>   cases, but get a foggy answer why.  We know that occasionally there
>   is difference between CO and CR and know that this knowledge may
>   affect our treatment plan  But my question deals with all the other
>   times. For your information I am board certified and have been in
>   practice for 18 years. I am wondering if I am missing something.
>
> Cheerio
> Jim Faulkner
>  Kennebunkport, Maine  (home of the REAL PRESIDENTS- note the "s")
>

I know a few of the people here have been doing it for years. They
led me to start mounting models and I am thankful for their guidance.
Had I not been part of this group (ESCO) I think I would not have
changed.

Me, I've only been mounting models for a bit over a year.

The occlusion is (remarkably) more accurate regarding the overbite
and buccal relations. Models ground with a wax bite I now regard as
bordering on fictitious.

Plus it is (a little) cheaper and frees my staff up. It is easier for
the staff to get this right than model trimmer models.

You are proabably right, much of the time it makes little diference
but already I have a couple of patients where the diference from
mounting is significantly different to hand held models. I know I can
hear arguments already as to why it should make no difference. IMHO
it has made a difference.

In a decade or two I expect the publication standards for changes to
occlusion induced with orthodontics will need to be measured off
mounted models as hand held models will not have (it never has had)
adequate reliability and accuracy to measure for example the change
in molar relations in mm between pretreatment, deband and
posttreatment. This accuracy is required if a meaningful
interpretation of postreatment crowding, overbite and overjet changes
is desired.

So James, I am not saying you are wrong or your records are poor or
deficient just that for me I think there may be a better way.

Cheers,
Mark Cordato
Bathurst
markc@ix.net.au

Date: Sat, 01 Jul 2000 13:19:15 CEST
From: "Ana Nicolas" <anzanita@hotmail.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Orthodontits in Buenos Aires
Message-ID: <20000701111915.84268.qmail@hotmail.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Hi!
My name is Ana and I'll stay in Buenos Aires taken part in a ortho
postgraduate intership at J.F. Kennedy University from August to October.
I'd like to meet orthodontists from Buenos Aires and to attend to their
practices if possible during this period in order to learn some technics
used in Argentina.

Best regards from Spain,
Ana.


________________________________________________________________________
Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 710

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Mso's and new grads
        by Mbellard@aol.com
  3) Starting from "scratch"
        by "Paul D. Zuelke" <zuelke@email.msn.com>
  4) Re: Mounted Models
        by Craig Andreiko <andreikoc@sprynet.com>
  5) Re: Mounting Cases
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  6) Re: workman's comp
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
  7) Nikon Coolpix 990
        by Brett Kerr <bkerr@uq.net.au>
Date: Fri, 07 Jul 2000 10:20:48 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000707102048.0082b950@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

17




Date: Thu, 6 Jul 2000 22:09:06 EDT
From: Mbellard@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Mso's and new grads
Message-ID: <38.83b8a98.269695c2@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

To Robert Pickron, OrthoAlliance member
 
Dear Robert,

I would like to make the following counterpoints to your ESCO post regarding
new graduates and mso's.  First, who ever said it was going to be easy
starting your own orthodontic practice? The best things in life never are. 
Certainly, as you say, there are challenges in getting a good lease, getting
a good buildout, and marketing your practice. And yes, new grads need
mentoring (I still do, too), but don't sell them short.  The point is that
new grads are equipped to handle these and other challenges, and will be
seasoned by the process.  I find the language you use, like other mso
supporters (mso members, of course), plays on the fears and insecurities of
residents.  Ortho residents are the best and brightest people in dentistry. I
trust that they will see through the mso sales rhetoric and resist the
temptation of an easy start, and instead holdout for the superior rewards
(financial and otherwise) that true private practice holds.  As for
mentoring, there are great consultants available who are very capable of
helping you get going in the right direction, and advising you along the way
to stay competitive in any market.  In short, you don't need to become
chained for life to an mso to achieve a successful practice.  Mso's are
looking for new grads to make money for them, and as I've said before, that's
not why I went to school.

Mark Bellard
Date: Wed, 5 Jul 2000 09:01:44 -0700
From: "Paul D. Zuelke" <zuelke@email.msn.com>
To: "ESCO" <Orthod-L@USC.edu>
Subject: Starting from "scratch"
Message-ID: <003501bfe69a$50bbcbe0$086fa8c0@potlnd1.or.home.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/related;
        type="multipart/alternative";
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0031_01BFE65F.A433C100"

137874e0.jpg 

I am very much in line with Dr. Lively's comment regarding the choices available to recent graduates.  I spent ten years in banking and now 21 years as an orthodontic consultant.  Start-up money, and lots of it, is available to new orthodontists.  In fact, there are very few people that bankers would rather lend their money to and, from the lender's perspective, there are few better reasons to borrow money.  Start-up capital is not a problem.
 
It does take some courage, some self-confidence, and a willingness to be at risk, to start your own practice and/or to borrow money to build or purchase a practice.  However, the net income will be there, in time to pay the school loans, the bank loans, and with enough left over to take a decent salary.  Once those loans are paid.......  We have 500+ orthodontic clients, some are "old-timers" and others are recently out of school, but all started from "scratch."  None of them, not even one, would trade his or her experience.
 
As I wrote a couple of years ago, the MSO experience is right for some doctors, but it would be a serious mistake for a young graduate to believe that participating with an MSO is the only realistic choice he or she has.
 
Paul D. Zuelke

Date: Wed, 05 Jul 2000 08:40:47 -0700
From: Craig Andreiko <andreikoc@sprynet.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Mounted Models
Message-ID: <396356FF.6EEB1986@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi,
    I guess the part I have trouble understanding is why articulated
models are more accurately related, upper to lower, than are ground.  It
seems to me that the bite registration is all that could be different.
If one uses the same bite registration technique then I can't see what
the difference would be.  That is unless, of course, the articulated
models are set up with protrusive and lateral check bites.  What is the
point of doing that for T1 ortho where you expect the occlusion to be
changing?  The whole mounting issue seems to me to be much more sensible
for pre-T2 so you can look for interferences and function.
Craig Andreiko

Date: Wed, 5 Jul 2000 12:36:03 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Lester Kuperman" <lester@kupermanortho.com>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Mounting Cases
Message-ID: <006601bfe69f$1c617200$41e42304@dsl.gtei.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Nicely stated!  And it's gratifying to see the "indoctrination" from the
various courses didn't cloud your ability to ask the important questions.  I
sometimes think the cosmic significance of joint space and condylar position
is a discussion best held at the bar over adult beverages.  It seems like
you've found the path of reason despite having multiple articulator systems.
Was it Lysle Johnston who defined gnathology as "the study of how
articulators chew"?

Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Department of Orthodontics and
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
University of North Carolina
Chapel Hill, NC

----- Original Message -----
From: Lester Kuperman <lester@kupermanortho.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Saturday, July 01, 2000 5:00 PM
Subject: RE: Mounting Cases


> A little knowledge is dangerous!  Unfortunately, I know a little about a
> lot.  Readers beware!
>
> After 22 years of experience using a Quint laminagraph, I have read and
> listened to various opinions questioning the validity of TMJ tomos.  My
> experience with these films has been excellent especially when used and
> interpreted correctly while realizing their limitations...as any other
> diagnostic tool.   I've also taken numerous, but certainly not all,
> occlusion and TMD courses over the years.  I am a proud owner of two
> articulator systems----which adorn my lab shelving most of the time.
Please
> don't take me lightly since I own 3 & 4 articulators of each system along
> with the variators and other devices.  We do occasionally use mounted
models
> when deemed appropriate--such as open bites and surgical cases.
>
> As a result of the above, I have more questions than answers.
>
> The real question and dilemma is who can scientifically define and
document
> the TRUE CENTRIC RELATIONSHIP?  What is Centric Relation?  It was
different
> for the earlier gnathologists than most currently held beliefs.  Is it
> possible that centric relation might be the wrong position for SOME
finished
> cases?  Perhaps, centric occlusion is best for that particular patient. Is
> there true data that supports any of the myriad of mandibular manipulation
> and mounting techniques?  Are there studies that demonstrate accurately
and
> without bias what the actual condyle position is for any given
manipulation
> technique?  How can the techniques all be different and correct at the
same
> time?  If one religiously mounts their cases, does that mean they are
saying
> a prayer that the condylar position is correct?  Has anyone ever verified
> the condylar position radiographically for a their definition of centric
> relation?  Or is this highly significant subject being addressed
anecdotally
> by our authorities and leaders?  (I suppose we could ask similar questions
> about amalgam.)
>
> What about growth?  What is the normal condyle-fossa relationship in a
> growing child--or adolescent?  When is the joint fully formed?  What
changes
> in joint morphology occur with various treatment modalities?  Do we have
the
> mechanics to fully treat to our perceived mounted-models-treatment-plans
in
> a realistic fashion for all of our patients?
>
> When models are mounted, how do we know where the condyle really
> is???????????????   And if we do, then how do we accurately duplicate the
> movements of this complex joint with flat articulator sufaces?  And where
is
> the disc especially in clicking patients?  And how do we compensate on our
> mounted models for disc displacements, perforations, and adhesions?
>
> I believe that I know  some of the answers to these questions but would
> rather hear your responses.  If any of you would be kind enough to provide
> me with valid references, I would be most appreciative.
>
> Thank you,
> Lester Kuperman
> Fort Worth, TX
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Mark Cordato [mailto:markc@ix.net.au]
> Sent: Monday, June 26, 2000 3:07 AM
> To: orthod-l@usc.edu
> Subject: Re: Mounting Cases
>
>
> Dear James,
>
> On 19 Jun 00, at 21:47, James M Faulkner wrote:
>
> > Dear Club Members,
> >
> >   At the risk of being ostracized for ignorance, I have a basic
> >   question to float around. Why would you routinely articulate your
> >   study models? I know orthodontists that routinely mount all their
> >   cases, but get a foggy answer why.  We know that occasionally there
> >   is difference between CO and CR and know that this knowledge may
> >   affect our treatment plan  But my question deals with all the other
> >   times. For your information I am board certified and have been in
> >   practice for 18 years. I am wondering if I am missing something.
> >
> > Cheerio
> > Jim Faulkner
> >  Kennebunkport, Maine  (home of the REAL PRESIDENTS- note the "s")
> >
>
> I know a few of the people here have been doing it for years. They
> led me to start mounting models and I am thankful for their guidance.
> Had I not been part of this group (ESCO) I think I would not have
> changed.
>
> Me, I've only been mounting models for a bit over a year.
>
> The occlusion is (remarkably) more accurate regarding the overbite
> and buccal relations. Models ground with a wax bite I now regard as
> bordering on fictitious.
>
> Plus it is (a little) cheaper and frees my staff up. It is easier for
> the staff to get this right than model trimmer models.
>
> You are proabably right, much of the time it makes little diference
> but already I have a couple of patients where the diference from
> mounting is significantly different to hand held models. I know I can
> hear arguments already as to why it should make no difference. IMHO
> it has made a difference.
>
> In a decade or two I expect the publication standards for changes to
> occlusion induced with orthodontics will need to be measured off
> mounted models as hand held models will not have (it never has had)
> adequate reliability and accuracy to measure for example the change
> in molar relations in mm between pretreatment, deband and
> posttreatment. This accuracy is required if a meaningful
> interpretation of postreatment crowding, overbite and overjet changes
> is desired.
>
> So James, I am not saying you are wrong or your records are poor or
> deficient just that for me I think there may be a better way.
>
> Cheers,
> Mark Cordato
> Bathurst
> markc@ix.net.au
>
>

Date: Wed, 5 Jul 2000 18:14:05 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: workman's comp
Message-ID: <44.523d4c4.26950d2d@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 00-07-05 17:29:34 EDT, you write:

<< My communication of 27th June regarding a dental assistant with supposed
 work-related tendonitis of the right hand and thumb was half complete,
 and I apologise for the unfinished letter. As mentioned, I have a
 chairside assistant who is about to claim compensation for a work related
 "overuse injury". Has anyone had a staff member with this problem, or is
 anyone aware of any articles in the literature regarding this situation?
 I intend to fight this as I do not believe the condition is work related.
 Thank you for your assistance.
 Denise Lawry >>

Denise,

The advice I am going to give worked for me in the US.  Things (laws) may be
different in the land of Crocodile Dundee so check with your attorney or
check with your Workman's Comp carrier as suggested by Dr. Redmond.

I've had this happen to me twice in 20 years.  Once it was a front desk
person and then it was a clinical assistant.  I've always taken the approach
that staff are long term investments.  I've seen colleagues take a different
tack with staff and it tends to be more confrontational that way.

Assuming your staff are long term investments, you might start by asking your
Workman's Comp carrier for advice.  I did not do that.  I asked a PT I was
friendly with for her advice on the issue.  She told me that she wanted to
make a site visit and observe the front desk employee at work.  She felt that
she might be able to make some suggestions regarding work habits, work
posture, etc.  In fact, she made one site visit and suggested that the staff
person needed more support for her wrists and forearms while doing data
entry.  She recommended a chair with special forearm supports that would cost
around $800 (8 years ago).  I was delighted to have that info and doubly
delighted when she suggested that my Workman's Comp carrier might pay for the
chair as an "injury preventer."  That is exactly what happened.  The staff
person is still with me and while she does not do quite as much data entry as
she used to, she works with a computer 60% of her day with no recurrance of
the problem.

The other situation involved my lead chairside assistant.  She basically did
everything and was always willing to jump in and do more than her fair share
if someone was falling behind.  She started to complain that if she did
several debands in a day, her wrist would hurt afterwards.  She attributed it
to removing composite with a carbide tipped bond removing plier.  She felt
this repetitive motion was the cause of the problem.

Interestingly, her dad is a machinest and she and her dad are constantly
making things together.  She has made a custom canoe with dad as well as a
sea going kayak.  At the time she was experiencing problems in the office,
she was also doing a lot of custom basket making with a friend.  Obviously,
this is a person that likes to stay busy and use her hands as part of her
hobbies.

She and I talked it over.  It was clear to me that she was a career oriented
DA and she did not want to leave the office or be forced to leave.  We tried
to modify her duties so she did fewer debands in a day.  Her limit seemed to
be one or occasionally two.  She also came to realize that basket making was
not helping the situation so she stopped that on her own.  Again, she is
still with me after 5 plus years and no additional problems.  She is now
clinical supervisor.  And we no longer remove cement with a carbide tipped
plier.

My suggestion is to take people at face value.  When I teach on staff
management, I frequently use the expression, "Expect a lot.  You will rarely
be disappointed."  I believe that and it seems to be an attitude that works
for me.

Warmest regards

Charlie Ruff
Date: Thu, 06 Jul 2000 11:33:09 +1000
From: Brett Kerr <bkerr@uq.net.au>
To: "orthod-l@usc.edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Nikon Coolpix 990
Message-ID: <3963E1D5.956E194E@uq.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have just bought a Nikon Coolpix 990 digital camera.  I am trying to
figure out how best to use it for intra-oral shots, but the learning
curve is steep!

Has anyone in the group any advice?  Either direct settings etc., or
info on guide books, web sites etc. would be welcomed.

TIA

Brett Kerr,
Brisbane,
Australia.
Embedded Content: 137874e0.jpg: 00000001,3a8ae7cb,00000000,00000000 Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\anabnr21.gif" Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\Nature Bkgrd1.jpg" ORTHOD-L Digest 711 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Nikon 990 by "Javier Ibañez Brambila" 3) Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 by M-C Conne Domon 4) Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030 by "Williams, Bryan" 5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 710 Articulators again by DrDCarter@aol.com 6) Mounting Study Casts by Bob Frantz 7) Re: Mounted Models by "Mark Cordato" 8) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 708 by "Kevin C. Walde" 9) cement by Orthodmd@aol.com 10) orthododontist in Nottingham, UK by "yeeny huang" Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2000 15:09:20 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000711150920.00798240@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 18 Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2000 16:57:57 -0500 From: "Javier Ibañez Brambila" To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU Subject: Nikon 990 Message-ID: <20000708215757.MLA859.mta04@onebox.com> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit MIME-Version: 1.0 Nikon 990 is a very good digital camera to intra and extraoral photography, this is the settings that Rob, give me in DPR (http://www.dpreview.com/) for intraoral photos: Here are the manual settings you will need: 1) macro 2) white balance - flash 3) forced flash 4) aperature priority - adjust zoom so your f-stop is 9.9 for best depth of field 5) matrix metering 6) center weighted focusing. 7) flash output -0.7 ( I prefer -0.3) 8) You don't need a ring flash. The point flash built into the camera is excellent and provides aesthetic shadowing that a ring flash won't give. If you find the right cheek casting too much of a shadow, you can either pull the camera back a little bit or flip it upside down to get the point on the other side. 9) Normal distance from subject is about 8 inches. Purchase your left thumb on the camera (near the flash) and your pinky on the patient's cheek/chin. Have fun, Rob -- Dr. Javier Ibanez Brambila shark123@zdnetonebox.com - email ___________________________________________________________________ To get your own FREE ZDNet Onebox - FREE voicemail, email, and fax, all in one place - sign up today at http://www.zdnetonebox.com Date: Sun, 09 Jul 2000 19:54:48 +0200 From: M-C Conne Domon To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.20000709195448.007be100@mail.swissonline.ch> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" At 11:33 06.07.00 +1000, you wrote: >I have just bought a Nikon Coolpix 990 digital camera. I am trying to >figure out how best to use it for the intra-oral shots, but the learning >curve is steep! > >Has anyone in the group any advice? Either direct settings etc., or >info on guide books, web sites etc. would be welcomed. Hello, I take all the intra-oral shots in a mirror with the flash and the macro setting. For the right side, I hold the camera upside down to have the flash in the mouth instead of the cheek's shadow. Only the front (smile) shot is taken without the flash. Since the sequence is always the same, I have built a macrocommand in Photoshop to process all the pictures at the same time with only one click of the mouse. Resizing them all, rotating and/or flipping when necessary ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Dr Marie-Claire CONNE DOMON e-mail: mcconne@swissonline.ch 69 rue du Rhone http://www.dentiste-geneve.ch/ CH-1207 Geneva tel ++41 22 735 28 35 fax ++41 22 735 76 85 Switzerland Date: Sun, 9 Jul 2000 21:30:26 -0700 From: "Williams, Bryan" To: "'orthod-l@usc.edu'" Subject: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030 Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Further to the digital camera question I am trying to decide between 2 good quality digital cameras- the Nikon Coolpix 990 and the Olympus C-3030. They are both 3.3 million pixel cameras and the prices are similar. My planned usage is for general photography (mostly home photography) with occasional use as a back up clinical camera. We recently purchased a Minolta RD 175 as our main digital clinic camera (just starting the learning process) but I anticipate that inevitably there will be some breakdowns and a backup may be needed. One obvious difference between the two cameras is the positioning of the flash relative to the lens. This seems like it would be significant when one is using the camera for close up applications. I am an absolute rookie in anything to do with digital photography and I'd deeply appreciate any feedback on these two cameras. Thanks Bryan Williams Children's Hospital - Seattle Date: Sat, 8 Jul 2000 08:29:16 EDT From: DrDCarter@aol.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 710 Articulators again Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Recent postings by Paul M. Thomas and Lester Kuperman and Craig Andreiko cannot be answered by writing as well as by experiencing the differences between model trimmer centric and articulator centric. All I can state is my own experience. I first went to a GP course on occlusion which opened my eyes to my own ortho problems, and realized that I knew a lot about alignment and zero about dynamic function. As I grew to learn articulators, I realized that while imperfect, they allow us to visualize a problem in three dimensions better than any other method. So I mount cases on a simple Whip Mix articulator (developed by Niles Guichet as a simple method of analyzing casase before mounting reconstruction problems on his "big box" Denar fully adjustable instrument). As Craig says, initial mounting doesn't require as much information about condylar inclination, etc., as that required to construct crowns or bridges. But it IS a three dimensional recording unlike hand held models. I was heartened a few years ago to hear Larry Andrews explain his disposable articulators as sufficient for ortho because we really only need to capture the terminal relation. Exactly. All the angles and curves are immaterial because we are going to move the teeth. But, we must know where we're heading. Without a map, it's just a guess. So while some are content to argue, others have found true utility in having a more accurate diagnostic tool which cuts our error rate immeasurably. Once one learns to mount cases, one realizes that the majority of class II cases have significant vertical interferences which can be seen and demonstrated and replicated and felt. As the mandibular cast is moved against the maxillary member, it is possible to see the condylar member separate from the eminence. Why bother? Because this is what occurs in all of our patients. They are not just a set of teeth. Articulators are simply a method of visualizing the problems of occlusion more fully. If one carries the disbelievers logic to conclusion, why make models at all. We have the teeth to view in vivo. And why record the positions now since we're going to move thenm anyway? I have been contemplating a one day hands-on course for orthodontists with assistants which would teach simple case mounting on an inexpensive Whip Mix articulator system (not because there aren't other good systems, because that's what I know). Is there any interest for such an endeavor? Dick Carter 3250 NW 185th Portland OR 97229-3404 USA DrDCarter@aol.com 503.690.0722 Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2000 21:28:23 -0700 From: Bob Frantz To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU Subject: Mounting Study Casts Message-ID: <3967FF66.C783A6F@best.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit In response to questions from several individuals, I offer my response. I apologize for the length, but it seemed indicated. Why are articulated models more accurately related, upper to lower, than are ground models? It should be very clear to all that they are not more accurate. However, something should be said for the handles. As a method of evaluating the relationship between upper and lower casts, the articulator mounting has many advantages over the unrelated, ground casts. If the interocclusal record is removed, as must be done to evaluate tooth contact, then transverse discrepancies and relations are lost. If there is contact on only the posterior teeth, then evaluating that is difficult at best, while the models are positioned on the bench. Viewing the lingual relations in a more realistic vertical position is impossible unless there is some type of mechanism to relate the upper to the lower cast. In this case, if one subscribes to a seated condylar reference position, then utilizing a technique to capture the “hinge axis” is important. For this the hinge becomes an integral part of the evaluation. Bite registrations are the only difference. Quite true, the importance of the “bite registration” is important. However, one must be aware of the limitations of the centric bite of the day. Each technique is operator sensitive, and it is not a skill that one achieves without some practice. Reproducibility is difficult at best and requires skill and practice, mostly practice. Use of lateral and protrusive check bites. If one chooses an instrument which only follows straight lines, then these procedures will seem adequate. If the true border movement of the mandible is important for the success of the treatment, then these will not be sufficient, and at best could only give an indication of the functional movements which are being portrayed. Mounting at T2. Assuming this is at a time prior to appliance removal, this would have to be another ideal time to observe. If one could avoid problems by observing earlier, is there no value in that? Why would one wish to limit the information available? Indoctrination and clouding ones abilities. Indoctrination from various courses and abilities to ask questions. Does this suggest that those who find value in mounting cases have been indoctrinated and are only following the guru? Perhaps this represents utilization of the scientific method as originally proposed. Observation is a part of the scheme, is it not? Definition of Gnathology An operational definition of gnathology might be the measurement of how the tops of the teeth move across each other, and how to design a system which will allow movement without detrimental collision. It is obvious that articulators do not chew, and that most humans are not rigid structures that move in straight lines. The articulator is a tool, nothing more. Some find it useful, and after having it help to provide satisfactory results with our treatment, choose to use it as a measuring instrument. None of us, who follow a clinical path, want less than the best for our patients. These gnathologic concepts have helped refine that which we do on a daily basis. The fallacy of using tomographs as the basis for utilizing or not utilizing mounted study casts. Viewing a two dimensional representation of a thin slice of a structure gives credence to the concern the clinician has for the integrity of the structure, but beyond that, the relationship is less clear. In making the decision to mount casts or not, TMD may be a factor, but only one. The value of the technique does not rely solely on its ability to identify a “disease state”. Owning machines: The fact that several systems have been purchased over the years, could suggest several things. Different systems do some things better than others, and this could be a reason. Things have improved, and with time we learn and choose systems which serve us better. A better use for usable systems might be donation rather than adornment. Questions: What is Centric Relation and has it changed? It would appear that the meaning, and what that represents has not changed. The semantics have and the precise wording has been altered, but what is represented has not. The condyle has always been viewed as being most stable when it is positioned against the eminence with the disk interposed and from which position all movements of the mandible could be made. Centric Relation wrong for some finished cases. If there is no disk, if the morphology of the system will not allow this, then perhaps one could suggest that centric relation coincident with centric occlusion might not be the best for the patient. In the absence of pathology, that is, a healthy joint, it is difficult to understand how a position of stability would be detrimental. Is it better to learn to treat to the what if case, or to the healthy case? The answer would appear obvious. Mandibular manipulation and mounting techniques: If the reason for utilizing these techniques, is the achievement of a reference position, then utilization of observation, hypothesis formation, testing, and corroboration would appear to provide the necessary verification and data sought. It is suggested that if a reference position is located, then the method that is used to capture that relation does not matter. Perhaps the methods necessary to achieve this position need further refinement, but the repeatability of such a position in the hands of skilled clinicians suggest that it is possible. In other words, centric is centric is centric. Religion, Prayer and mounting cases: Methods are available to test the reliability and reproducibility of the techniques, and they have been published. With more sophisticated measuring tools, will these techniques be shown to be inaccurate? Almost certainly! Is one doing the same when no measurements are taken as compared to using a standardized approach? Again the answer appears obvious. Condylar position radiographically in centric relation: Why would one technique with as many inherent variations as tomography, be held as the gold standard for evaluation of a position over another with equally as many variables. Perhaps the ease with which one is obtainable, and the ability to visualize what appears to be a good representation has deceived us. It may be possible that both techniques offer advantages, and useful information. The future may provide better methods of obtaining the information with less effort, but until that occurs, testing one against another may obscure the value of both. Growth and the normal condyle-fossa relationship: Change and increase in size occur. Our patients generally grow larger. Yet, has anyone suggested that more basketball players could be produced if we held the surfaces of the knees apart? There does appear to be some semblance of order with regard to the workings of the parts. The “closed packed” joint appears to remain as that which has the best opportunity to function. Function is the operative term—movement. Centric or the seat Condylar reference position is just that, a place that can be returned to for evaluation. To interject these other questions, only clouds the issue—why mount casts. Mechanics available to treat to the plan: Assessment of this question requires the reference against which to judge. Unfortunately, unless the same records are taken prior to treatment and then after, and then compared, the answer will elude us. For some, there is sufficient evidence that mounting casts is one method of assessment. Again, observation is the key. Articulators duplicating movements: The gnathic system is not made up of flat surfaces, and to use a system which is unable to duplicate the movement one is interested it makes little sense. Does this mean that there is no valuable information available with such instrumentation. If the limitations are recognized and accepted, then much is to be gained. If one expects to hold a fully representational model of the skull in one’s hand, then disappointment awaits. TMD, discs, clicking: Do not all of these suggest pathology or at least alteration of structure? Should the clinician expect to be able to avoid taking these changes into account when treatment is contemplated? If in only one case, the use of a technique can more accurately represent the condition, is the effort wasted? If the technique has been thoroughly investigated and discarded as useless, then please disclose the reasoning. If on the other side, others find value, with little increase in risk for our patients, then what is to be gained by casting aspersions. Which leads to the final comment: Valid references: What constitutes references which are acceptable, and who deems them valid. Is the Scientific Method really defined by double blindedness. Observation and testing would still seem to be part of the scheme. The goal of the profession should be to improve, not tilt windmills. If a segment of a profession utilizes a technique, finds it useful and valuable, and produces results which corroborates their hypotheses, then isn’t it incumbent upon the profession to at least look over their shoulders and try and duplicate that which appears to be working? Thank you for your persistence. I speak only for myself, and my experiences. I have found this to be a valuable tool, and I believe it has made my practice better and my life easier. Robert Frantz, DDS Orthodontist Date: Sun, 9 Jul 2000 18:45:49 +1000 From: "Mark Cordato" To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: Mounted Models Message-ID: <200007090845.SAA19325@mail.ix.net.au> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII Content-transfer-encoding: 7BIT Dear Craig On 5 Jul 00, at 8:40, Craig Andreiko wrote: > Hi, > I guess the part I have trouble understanding is why articulated > models are more accurately related, upper to lower, than are ground. > It seems to me that the bite registration is all that could be > different. If one uses the same bite registration technique then I > can't see what the difference would be. That is unless, of course, > the articulated models are set up with protrusive and lateral check > bites. What is the point of doing that for T1 ortho where you expect > the occlusion to be changing? The whole mounting issue seems to me to > be much more sensible for pre-T2 so you can look for interferences and > function. Craig Andreiko In a previous posting I suggested that ground casts probably give much of the clinical information most of the time. You asked where differences between hand held and articulated models might be. IMHO if wax is being used for the bite registration and grinding then even the best lab will return the models with the bite a little different as the pressure and vibrations distort the wax. This would be why mounted casts would be more accurate. Other bite registration materials will be less susceptible to creep (I use silicon). I agree that I usually am going to control each and every erupted tooth in full banding so pretreatment interferences are invariably going to be moved so the pretreatment prositions are not as relevant but then again if you take your logic further, if we are going to move all the teeth then why bother with casts? I believe it is to see what we started with. Hand held models are a an unreliable means of determining pretreatment overbite especially in open bite and incomplete overbite cases. Your point about T1 and T2 is most reasonable but I aslo found that as my wax bites distorted they were more likely to return ground nearer to CO than CR and when held by hand they were also more likely to move towards CO with both giving a false view of the problem to be addressed. Maybe these problems were issues within my office alone (and every uni department I have ever seen which used wax bites) but these problems have been cured for me now that models are being mounted. But hand held models look and feel prettier. Please yourself and don't mount models, I see this as one of the smaller improvements I have made to the way I work in the last few years. I am sure I could return to hand held models if I had to but I would prefer I did not. Yours, Mark Cordato Bathurst markc@ix.net.au Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2000 15:54:02 -0500 From: "Kevin C. Walde" To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 708 Message-ID: <396794E6.9B8FD3B5@usmo.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit What is "European Orthodontics"? Is it synonymous with "Functional Orthodontics"? If that's what you're looking for it's simply a term used by the weekend hotel orthodontic lecturers (not to be confused with educators) to make their "students" somehow feel they are learning a superior form of orthodontics. Many European orthodontists are educated in the U.S., do they practice differently than we do? What you want is an AAO member and preferably one that is ABO certified (ABO certification won't guarantee a better practitioner but there is a certain amount of effort required to become certified). Mounting models? Cheaper, OK. Higher fee, all right... but providing more information about CR-CO? And "never believe what you see in the mouth."?! Do you mean to say that mounted study models with all of the inherent errors induced in the transfer process, distortion of impressions, etc., give you a better picture of the patient than a clinical exam? Just because someone teaches something doesn't mean it is so. Experience doesn't necessarily make someone correct. For thousands of years the Sun revolved around the Earth. If mounting models is cheaper and more profitable, I'm all for it. But if you are telling me that mounted models allow you to make a better diagnosis and, more importantly, get a better result, where's the evidence to support this? Happy Trails, Kevin Walde, Washington, MO (the Show-Me State) Date: Sun, 9 Jul 2000 09:58:25 EDT From: Orthodmd@aol.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: cement Message-ID: <25.8104781.2699df01@aol.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I'm second guessing myself again on the proper kind of band cement to use. I use both Bandlok and Fuji I. I like Bandlok for ease of use and ease of removal. I like Fuji because bands never seem to come off prematurly. Any thoughts? Also, anyone using Eureka springs? Thoughts? Thanks Charlie Ruff Date: Sat, 08 Jul 2000 23:01:00 PDT From: "yeeny huang" To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: orthododontist in Nottingham, UK Message-ID: <20000709060100.7634.qmail@hotmail.com> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed Dear Colleagues, I have a patient who will be going to Nottingham, UK for further studies in September. Anyone out there know of an orthodontist in Nottingham, kindly contact me. Thanks! Dr. Yeeny Huang Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com ORTHOD-L Digest 712 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics July 2000, Vol. 118, No. 1 by "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" 3) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 711 by "Rano Burton" 4) Re: cement by "Paul M. Thomas" 5) Re: cement by weiland@email.kfunigraz.ac.at (Frank Weiland) 6) Invisalign by Matasa@aol.com 7) Webshots Photo Album by druday@vsnl.com 8) APOLOGY by MDLoffice Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 11:59:32 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000714115932.007b17c0@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 19 Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 13:41:27 -0500 From: "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" To: ajodo_toc@mosby.com Subject: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics July 2000, Vol. 118, No. 1 Message-ID: <396E0D57.81DE5EB8@mosby.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics Table of Contents for July 2000, Vol. 118, No. 1 http://www.mosby.com/ajodo -------------------------------------------------------------- Editorial >From case reports and conflicts of interst David L. Turpin http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod11811 Policy on conflict of interest http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod11813 Original Articles Quality evaluation of orthodontic information on the World Wide Web You-Ling Jiang, DDS, MS Wildwood, Mo http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104492 Orthodontic dental visits during 1987 and 1996 Richard J. Manski, DDS, MBA, PhD, William M. Davidson, DDS, PhD, John F. Moeller, PhD Baltimore and Rockville, Md http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103775 Orthodontics and the population with special needs H. Barry Waldman, BA, DDS, MPH, PhD, Steven P. Perlman, DDS, MScD, Mark Swerdloff, DDS Stony Brook, NY, and Boston, Mass http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a105236 Special Article Defining characteristics of financially successful orthodontists Matthew J. Coats, DDS, MS, Sorin R. Straja, PhD, Gary Wiser, DDS, MS, MBA, Hayley Heckman, Wilbert Saavedra, Orhan C. Tuncay, DMD Flower Mound, Tex, Columbia, Md, Perrineville, NJ, and Philadelphia, Pa http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104818 Original Articles Posttreatment changes after successful correction of Class II malocclusions with the Twin Block appliance Christine M. Mills, DDS, MS, Kara J. McCulloch, DMD, MSD Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104902 Relapse in Angle Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated by tandem mechanics without extraction of permanent teeth: A retrospective analysis Javid Yavari, DMD, MS, Michael K. Shrout, DMD, Carl M. Russell, DMD, PhD, Andrew J. Haas, DDS, MS, Edward H. Hamilton, DDS Augusta, Ga, and Chicago, Ill http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104409 Stability of anterior openbite correction with multiloop edgewise archwire therapy: A cephalometric follow-up study Young H. Kim, DMD, MS, Unae Kim Han, DMD, MPH, MS, Diana D. Lim, DMD, MSD, Ma. Laarni P. Serraon, DMD, MSD Weston, Mass http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104830 Effective treatment plan for maxillary protraction: Is the bone age useful to determine the treatment plan? Naoto Suda, DDS, PhD, Masako Ishii-Suzuki, DDS, PhD, Ken Hirose, DDS, Shigetoshi Hiyama, DDS, PhD, Shoichi Suzuki, DDS, PhD, Takayuki Kuroda, DDS, PhD Tokyo, Japan http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104491 Masticatory muscle activity in children and adults with different facial types Hiroshi M. Ueda, DDS, Keisuke Miyamoto, DDS, PhD, MD, Saifuddin, BDS, Yasuo Ishizuka, DDS, PhD, Kazuo Tanne, DDS, PhD Hiroshima, Japan http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a99142 Nasal impairment in prepubertal children Ulla Crouse, DDS, M. T. Laine-Alava, DDS, PhD, D. W. Warren, DDS, PhD Lexington, Ky, and Chapel Hill, NC http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104952 Effect of methotrexate on the temporomandibular joint and facial morphology in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis patients Didem O. Ince, DDS, MS, PhD, Akgun Ince, MD, Terry L. Moore, MD St Louis, Mo http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104953 Soft tissue cephalometric norms in Japanese adults Rafael E. Alcalde, DDS, PhD, Tokiari Jinno, DDS, DDSc, M. Gabriela Orsini, DDS, PhD, Akira Sasaki, DDS, PhD, Raymond M. Sugiyama, DDS, MS, Tomohiro Matsumura, DDS, PhD Seattle, Wash, Okayama, Japan, and Loma Linda, Calif http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104411 Biological derivation of a range of cephalometric norms for children of African American descent (after Steiner) Arnett A. Anderson, DDS, MS, Angela C. Anderson, MD, Andrea C. Hornbuckle, MD, Kelvin Hornbuckle, MD Washington, DC, Providence, RI, and Cleveland, Ohio http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103258 Clinician’S Corner Tying twin brackets Jorge Faber, DDS, MS Brasília, Brazil http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104446 CDABO Case report Treatment of a Class I malocclusion with a carious mandibular incisor and no Bolton discrepancy Vincent O. Kokich, Jr, DMD, MSD Tacoma, Wash http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108562 Continuing Education Questions and registration forms Zane Muhl, Editor http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1181114 Ortho Bytes Powering up your PowerPoint presentations Frederich J. Regennitter, DDS http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108983 In Memoriam J. Edward Gilda, DDS, MS Robert E. Rosenblum, DMD, MS http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108784 Department of Reviews and Abstracts Temporomandibular joint dysfunction: A practitioner’s guide Annika Isberg http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181br Premolar autotransplantation in orthodontics treatment: A clinical and radiographic long-term study Hans Ulrik Paulsen http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181bra Directory: AAO officers and organizations http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181da Reader’s Services Editorial board http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181eb Information for authors http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181ia Information for readers http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181ir Availability of journal back issues http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181aj Bound volumes available to subscribers http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181bv AAO meeting calendar http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001181mc Readers’ Forum Changing times Al A. Atta http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108787 _______________________________________________________________________ Copyright (c) 2000 by Mosby, Inc. INFORMATION FOR READERS: To order a subscription call 1-800-453-4350 or visit us at http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?db=home&id=od. TO REMOVE YOURSELF FROM THIS LIST: Go to http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?action=etoc&id=od and enter your email address in the appropriate box. You can also unsubscribe by sending a message to majordomo@mosby.com with the words "unsubscribe ajodo_toc" as the body of the message. Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 08:12:10 EDT From: "Rano Burton" To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 711 Message-ID: <20000712121210.73704.qmail@hotmail.com> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed Further to our discussions about digital cameras. Has anyone tried the Dine Digital system? The Olympus C2500L was also recommended. Any thoughts TIA Rano ________________________________________________________________________ Get Your Private, Free E-mail from MSN Hotmail at http://www.hotmail.com Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 06:07:16 -0400 From: "Paul M. Thomas" To: , Subject: Re: cement Message-ID: <00c501bfebe8$f4cb08b0$c31e1918@paultower> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I have had voids or washout occur under bands cemented with Fuji (or other traditional glass ionomers) without the band failing. The result was decalcification or decay. I'd prefer that the band fail and require recementation. The beauty of cleanup fair outweighs any inconvenience of recementation IMHO. -=Paul=- Paul M. Thomas ----- Original Message ----- From: To: Sent: Sunday, July 09, 2000 9:58 AM Subject: cement > I'm second guessing myself again on the proper kind of band cement to use. I > use both Bandlok and Fuji I. I like Bandlok for ease of use and ease of > removal. I like Fuji because bands never seem to come off prematurly. Any > thoughts? > > Also, anyone using Eureka springs? Thoughts? > > Thanks > > Charlie Ruff > Date: Fri, 14 Jul 2000 09:34:10 +0200 (MET DST) From: weiland@email.kfunigraz.ac.at (Frank Weiland) To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: cement Message-ID: <200007140734.JAA22812@tom.kfunigraz.ac.at> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Dear Charly Same experience: I humbly returned to Fuji. More mess, but hardly ever a loose band! Kind regards Frank Weiland, DMD, PHD Univ.-Doz. Dr. Frank Weiland Klin.Abt. für Kieferorthopädie Univ.Klinik für ZMK Tel. +43 316 3852424 A-8036 GRAZ / LKH Fax +43 316 3854064 email weiland@email.kfunigraz.ac.at Date: Wed, 12 Jul 2000 10:37:59 EDT From: Matasa@aol.com To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: Invisalign Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Dear Dr. Zernik: I am reading with interest ESCO, and found that most clinicians underappreciate the Invisalign impact. I made an inquiry in the field, and my conclusions (grim for metalo-ortodontics) were presented in my newsletter, The Orthodontic Materials Insider, June 2000. I would like to send you, and to as many who are interested, a free copy of it. Please give me your mailing address so that I could send it to you. Sincerely, Prof. dr. Eng. Claude G. Matasa, Ortho-Cycle Co. Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 05:22:29 -0700 From: druday@vsnl.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Webshots Photo Album Message-ID: <200007131222.FAA31694@p5.webshots.com> Hi. Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community. Point your browser to this link: http://community.webshots.com/album/2948040miUupvdRmB Cheers, Dr.Uday _____________________________________ Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now Date: Thu, 13 Jul 2000 12:16:09 -0700 From: MDLoffice To: Electronic Study Club Subject: APOLOGY Message-ID: <396E1579.E52B0F55@gate.net> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Dear Group: I just wanted to apologize to Scott Smoron, a recent graduate, for the remark made in a post last week in which I called him ignorant with respect to his business experience ( I left the business experience part out of the post). It was in response to a posting about OCA. He has advised me that no one that he has contacted felt that his post was pro-OCA and that most residents are very much aware of the pitfalls involving MSO's. He advised me that the only negative responses were knee-jerk responses from the "older orthos". He also advised me that he has successfully purchased a practice and is not going the way of the MSO. I was also very happy to hear this and advised him that if one is willing to roll up their sleeves and struggle for awhile, they will find it to be a worthwhile experience. Ortho is such a great career. He also advised me that the older orthos were responsible for the current state of affairs for not paying graduates what they deserve to be paid as associates and for not helping with the financing. Based on his comments he was speaking for most residents. I thought I might pass this along to those hoping to find the right person to take over their practice. If this is the state of mind of most residents then you might be working longer than you were hoping. I was also advised that insulting someone has no place in an intelligent conversation. I have to agree with this and so I do apologize for my rude remark. If I am a representative of the "establishment" I hope that I have not been an embarrassment to you and I also apologize to my colleagues for my remarks. With warmest personal regards, Mark Lively -- Mark David Lively, DMD mdlively@gate.net Lively Orthodontics Stuart, Florida ORTHOD-L Digest 713 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Re: Invisalign by "Paul M. Thomas" 3) Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030 by WRed852509@cs.com 4) RE: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030 by "JK - ORTHOworks" 5) Re: Eureka springs; was cement by "Jeff Genecov" Date: Mon, 17 Jul 2000 12:38:57 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000717123857.007b2100@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 20 Date: Mon, 17 Jul 2000 07:09:04 -0400 From: "Paul M. Thomas" To: , Subject: Re: Invisalign Message-ID: <003201bfefe4$db42e700$1e3079a5@paul600x> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Dr. Matasa, I've watched the whole Invisalign thing with interest or perhaps I should say curiosity. Maybe it will have some impact, but I am not ready to run up the white flag. After 20 years I can still count the number of patients treated successfully with removable appliances on one hand. Patients will comply with something that doesn't impact appreciably on their lifestyle. They will wear a retainer at night.....sometimes. Few will wear something 24 hours per day, especially for the period of time to achieve the desired and detailed changes. Time, of course, will reveal the truth of this, but I think the metalo-orthodontists don' t have to panic just yet..... Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS Adjunct Associate Professor Departments of Orthodontics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery UNC School of Dentistry Manning Drive Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514 ----- Original Message ----- From: To: Sent: Wednesday, July 12, 2000 10:37 AM Subject: Invisalign > Dear Dr. Zernik: > I am reading with interest ESCO, and found that most clinicians > underappreciate the Invisalign impact. I made an inquiry in the field, and my > conclusions (grim for metalo-ortodontics) were presented in my newsletter, > The Orthodontic Materials Insider, June 2000. I would like to send you, and > to as many who are interested, a free copy of it. Please give me your mailing > address so that I could send it to you. Sincerely, Prof. dr. Eng. Claude G. > Matasa, Ortho-Cycle Co. > Date: Mon, 17 Jul 2000 03:00:09 EDT From: WRed852509@cs.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030 Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hi Bryan, I am here in Seattle thru 7/19 aand would like to get together with you for a short period to explain the modifications of the Olympus digital camera for intraoral photos. I will be in my downtown Seattle office if you you like to call me (206.467.6877). I'm not sure where Children's Hospital is, but it can't be too far away from my office (700 5th Avenue, #1616, Seattle , WA 98104). I look forward to hearing from you. Rron Redmond DDS, MS Date: Tue, 11 Jul 2000 19:21:03 -0400 From: "JK - ORTHOworks" To: Subject: RE: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030 Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit For our practice we purchased the Olympus C3030... minimal learning curve, great reds/colour balance even under florescent lighting, no flash requirements, no post-picture manipulation ... and as an additional factor... great for home use. I followed the manual and recommendations of the Digital Dentist ... www.digident.com That said however... I purchased the camera from a store that allows 2 weeks of using a camera prior to purchasing... tried them all and for now settled on the Olympus. Good luck with your choice. JK... John Kalbfleisch VILLAGEortho.com -----Original Message----- From: owner-orthod-l@usc.edu [mailto:owner-orthod-l@usc.edu]On Behalf Of Williams, Bryan Sent: Monday, July 10, 2000 12:30 AM To: 'orthod-l@usc.edu' Subject: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030 Further to the digital camera question I am trying to decide between 2 good quality digital cameras- the Nikon Coolpix 990 and the Olympus C-3030. They are both 3.3 million pixel cameras and the prices are similar. My planned usage is for general photography (mostly home photography) with occasional use as a back up clinical camera. We recently purchased a Minolta RD 175 as our main digital clinic camera (just starting the learning process) but I anticipate that inevitably there will be some breakdowns and a backup may be needed. One obvious difference between the two cameras is the positioning of the flash relative to the lens. This seems like it would be significant when one is using the camera for close up applications. I am an absolute rookie in anything to do with digital photography and I'd deeply appreciate any feedback on these two cameras. Thanks Bryan Williams Children's Hospital - Seattle Date: Sat, 15 Jul 2000 07:06:51 -0500 From: "Jeff Genecov" To: , Subject: Re: Eureka springs; was cement Message-ID: <006e01bfee55$38ac25a0$de1488cf@genecov> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit With regards to Charlie's question about Eureka Springs: Dors anyone know where they can be purchased? Jeff Genecov -----Original Message----- From: Paul M. Thomas To: Orthodmd@aol.com ; orthod-l@usc.edu Date: Wednesday, July 12, 2000 5:07 AM Subject: Re: cement >I have had voids or washout occur under bands cemented with Fuji (or other >traditional glass ionomers) without the band failing. The result was >decalcification or decay. I'd prefer that the band fail and require >recementation. The beauty of cleanup fair outweighs any inconvenience of >recementation IMHO. > > -=Paul=- > >Paul M. Thomas > > >----- Original Message ----- >From: >To: >Sent: Sunday, July 09, 2000 9:58 AM >Subject: cement > > >> I'm second guessing myself again on the proper kind of band cement to use. >I >> use both Bandlok and Fuji I. I like Bandlok for ease of use and ease of >> removal. I like Fuji because bands never seem to come off prematurly. >Any >> thoughts? >> >> Also, anyone using Eureka springs? Thoughts? >> >> Thanks >> >> Charlie Ruff >> > >
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 714

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Anterior extraction
        by iwire32@earthlink.net
  3) Gagger
        by "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
  4) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
  5) Eureka Spring
        by "Eugene Gottlieb" <egott@sedona.net>
  6) Info management of future
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  7) Bimler courses
        by "Bimler" <101.238565@germanynet.de>
  8) Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
        by "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
  9) Re: DIGITAL CAMERAS
        by "Maurie Costello" <braces@costellodental.com.au>
 10) Other Desital Camera
        by "jun" <j-1@ijk.com>
 11) Sony digital cameras
        by "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 08:28:04 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000724082804.00845a80@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

21




Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 01:19:58 -0700
From: iwire32@earthlink.net
To: ESCO <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Anterior extraction
Message-ID: <397BFC2D.FA7274E8@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

My experience with lower incisor extractions has been favorable using
immediate initiation of space closure following extraction and with
rapid closure.  I have been able to finish with a good amount of tissue
interproximally in what was the extraction site and the bone has looked
good radiographically.

But the current case in question has an almost full-size, erupted,
supernumerary, maxillary central incisor.  The tooth in the midline is
to be extracted because of its form and caries.  A consulting
periodontist has suggested that the bone be allowed to fully reorganize
before the adjacent teeth are moved into the extraction site.  I fear
that a long wait will result in loss of both alveolar height and
thickness and thereby cause a larger interproximal space in this
aesthetically critical area.

Any thoughts?  Please relate your practical experience (or reference to
any articles) as to the speed with which anterior extraction spaces can
or should be closed without causing problems to the periodontal
ligaments.

Art Kobal
Thousand Oaks

Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 16:03:59 -0400
From: "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Gagger
Message-ID: <006301bff0f3$5188c420$624efea9@privateoffice>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0060_01BFF0D1.C8CBE520"

Hi all,
    I have a very nice, well adjusted, above average, twelve y.o. boy with a terrible gag reflex. We have gotten thru records and extractions but bonding has been very difficult. I have tried several different retractors trying to avoid placing anything on the roof or floor of the mouth (these areas seem to precip. an unwanted reflex). I am considering using a glass ionomer cement so moisture control will be easier. I was able to get brackets 3I3  and separators today without incidence (mom not feeding him prior to the appt is also a plus), next week is bands, then place lower bonds later. Any suggestions? drugs? hypnosis? Any and all recommendations welcome.
 
Ernest McCallum
Greenwood SC
 
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 07:14:35 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Message-ID: <200007211414.HAA32208@p2.webshots.com>

Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/3180035DuTnnFwJSe

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
         
                   
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now


Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 12:31:27 -0700
From: "Eugene Gottlieb" <egott@sedona.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Eureka Spring
Message-ID: <001d01bff0ee$c6259e20$9139f5cc@egott.sedona.net2>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi all!

For those interested in the Eureka Spring and its source, there was an
article entitled "The Eureka Spring" in the July 1997 issue of JCO, page
454.

The source of the spring is Eurika Spring Company, 1312 Garden St., San Luis
Obispo, CA 93401.

Gene Gottlieb

Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 09:52:33 -0400
From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
To: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Info management of future
Message-ID: <001801bff3e4$16994620$2fb3fea9@g48sy>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/related;
        type="multipart/alternative";
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0014_01BFF3C2.8EB69A80"

Do you think information management in orthodontic offices will use devices like the one below?   Another innovation is in screen technology.  Check out www.trivium.com/news/crains_june2000.htm   Those interested in Trivium,  financially can contact Mr. David Kinsley at 1-914-767-0431.
 
Ron Parsons
Lawrenceville, GA
 
 
The Shape of PCs to Come?
Department: Technology & You
The new Qbe tablet computer from Aqcess Technologies (www.qbenet.com) may be a harbinger of shapes to come. The Qbe relies on data-entry technologies that aren't quite ready for prime time and is further handicapped by some poor design choices, but it is an interesting design pioneer.

The Qbe Cirrus that I tried is a box about 14 in. long, 10 in. wide, and 2 1/2 in. thick. The top is mostly covered by a 13.3-in. touch-sensitive display, and there's a built-in video camera at the top. The Qbe runs on a 400-MHZ Pentium II, features a 12-GB hard drive and 128 MB of RAM, and costs a steep $4,745. The less expensive Celeron-powered Genus model fetches $3,995. Both use Windows 98 and run standard PC software.

The Qbe is designed to be used on your lap or any horizontal surface. It stands up with a removable prop called a "porticle," which includes a full complement of parallel, serial, and other ports. With the prop and a keyboard and mouse attached, the Qbe is basically a variation on the desktop PC. Used as a tablet, however, it's something quite different from either a desktop or a notebook.

The problem is entering data. The Qbe offers three choices, none fully satisfactory. First, you can write on the screen with the pen, using ParaGraph's PenOffice software. Unfortunately, handwriting recognition doesn't work a lot better than it did in the days of Apple's much-ridiculed Newton. In the case of the Qbe, the accuracy problem is made worse by a noticeable delay before the writing actually appears on the screen. Having the option of a more accurate shorthand, like Palm's Graffiti, would be a big help.

The second method is to use the speech-recognition software included with the Qbe--Lernout & Hauspie's Voice Xpress. It does pretty well after you invest some time in training, but to get it to work I had to use a Telex digital headset to bypass the apparently defective audio system.

The final method is typing on a touch-sensitive keyboard that can pop up to cover the bottom quarter of the screen. The keys are big enough to hit with your fingers, and while touch typing is out of the question, the keyboard works well enough for limited amounts of data.

COOLER, CHEAPER. Beyond the data-entry problems, the Qbe has some design issues. At six pounds, it weighs heavy on your lap, especially since the Pentium heats the magnesium case up to an uncomfortable temperature. The Qbe can run on battery power, but only for about 90 minutes at a time, so you won't want to get very far from a power outlet. And this is a device that really wants a wireless connection to the Internet, since the tablet design is ideal for Web browsing.

Better, lighter, cooler, and cheaper tablets are on the way. Aqcess hopes to have a three-pound, $1,500 unit this fall. Later this summer, Qubit Technology plans to ship a much-delayed 2 1/2- pound Web-browsing tablet featuring a wireless link to the Internet.




 



 
Content-Type: application/octet-stream;
        name="display.cgi&DJL=0"

Content-Location: http://bwsub.pqarchiver.com/cgi-bin/display.cgi?F=http://pqacontent1:10001/cstore/Business_Week/Business_Week/Business_Week/2000/07/10/b3689086_1.GIF&H=pcs&id=3979a6d148380Mpqaweb1P11007&doc=document.html&ZZ=http://bwsub.pqarchiver.com/cgi-bin/display.cgi&DJL=0

Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 10:25:45 -0700
From: "Bimler" <101.238565@germanynet.de>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>, <laurent.gross@libertysurf.fr>
Subject: Bimler courses
Message-ID: <000d01bff338$c3aa4fa0$858abd97@dell-xps-d-300>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_000A_01BFF2FE.080ABE40"

 
-
 
Dear Sirs:
 
Maybe the included information is of interest for someone in your department. Thank you for your cooperation!
 
"Bimler Courses"  (July 2000)
 
11/12 August: Wiesbaden, Germany ("Weinwoche")
September: Rio de Janeiro & Campinas, Brasil
October: Tokyo, Japan
13-19. November, La Habana, Cuba
November, Mexico City
 
March  2001: Tokyo, Japan
21-23 June, Buenos Aires, Argentina
4-6 July, Buenos Aires, Argentina
September, Tokyo, Japan
 
Info: bimler@germnaynet.de
Tel. +49(611)304027 Fax ~377889
 
Sincerely yours, Dr. Barbara Bimler.
Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 10:40:06 -0400
From: "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
Message-ID: <003e01bff0c6$c5760460$624efea9@privateoffice>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi all,

 Last year I purchased an Olympus D620l (1.4 mp) camera. I have been
extremely happy with this model. It is a SLR (thru lens focusing) camera,
reachargeable batteries, screw on macro lens with flash diffuser, and a
built in flash. Photos are very good even in the medium quality setting. I
know this is not a 2.4 mp but has it has served me well. I wonder why
Olympus has not made a high mp SLR camera? Or do they? Are the download
times with a high mp camera greater than the increase in picture quality?
Anyone have a comparison b/n quality in picture and download time. -- Does
it make a difference? I am downloading thru a floppy adapter -- which can be
slow. Is anyone using a built in drive that accepts the flash cards? Where
can you get one ? $$? Too many questions? All the best.

Ernest McCallum
Greenwood SC

Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2000 06:53:01 +1000
From: "Maurie Costello" <braces@costellodental.com.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: DIGITAL CAMERAS
Message-ID: <001101bff1c3$55163a20$7b2d8aca@n6r1g9>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hey Guys: Why all this talk about the CoolPix?

I did my homework over several months and last month took delivery of the
BEST digital clinical camera I have ever had, to replace my aging Fuji 220.

I bought a SONY DSD D770. It is a single-lens-reflex camera, auto or manual
focus, completely programable or manually selectable, came with a ring flash
which can be switched down to 1/16 power output for intraoral..in all...its
is supurb.

Unlike the Olympus 2500, the Sony can be used in EITHER viewfinder mode, or
on the screen mode...while composing. Has instant playback.

I purchased mine from Dolphin ...no financial interest.

Have a look at the Sony: you will be pleased with what you see.

Maurie Costello
Orthodontist
Australia

Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 12:17:28 +0900
From: "jun" <j-1@ijk.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Other Desital Camera
Message-ID: <005701bff2d1$4d941420$2d1cd9ca@compaq>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Member

I found Desital Camera for intro-Oral Photo.
It is Fuji Fine Pix 2900Z with Original Ring Leight.(about 1800$)

It can take a picture with X1/2-1 intra-oral photo.
I hope that I take intra-oral photo and facial photo(x1/10).

Please sent some information.

Jun Matsumura
Kanagawa Japan
j-1@ijk.com


  

Date: Sun, 23 Jul 2000 17:56:21 -0400
From: "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Sony digital cameras
Message-ID: <002e01bff4f0$d937bba0$0a00a8c0@pickron.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_002B_01BFF4CF.4F3452E0"

Anyone have experience with Sony cameras in the clinical area? 
Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\display1.cgi"
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 715

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Gagger
        by MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
  3) gagger
        by ray.siat@xtra.co.nz
  4) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714
        by Bracha & Eli Tal <betal@netvision.net.il>
  5) Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
        by "Allan Ward" <award@albury.net.au>
  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714 digital cameras
        by "Dietmar Kennel" <Pediatric.Dentist@usa.net>
  7) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714-Eureka Spring
        by Ormond Grimes <ogrimes@internetpro.net>
Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2000 14:17:48 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000731141748.007ae540@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

22






Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 12:37:06 -0700
From: MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Gagger
Message-ID: <397C9AE2.A0389E24@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I just bonded a patient on Thursday who was born premature.  He has been
intubated approximately 38 times over the past 16 years and has
difficulty swallowing food.  He and his parents desperately wanted to
have his teeth aligned so we agreed to do the treatment.

No models were taken, only x-rays.  Photos were next to impossible.  We
managed to get cheek stretchers in, more than I was hoping for.  As I
have in prior cases, we bonded all teeth with FUJI and light cured.  I
spoke with mom again last night and he is doing great and all brackets
are still in place.  Could not have done this without the FUJI OrthoLC.

Mark

--
Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@gate.net

Lively Orthodontics
Stuart,  Florida



Date: Tue, Jul 25 2000 14:58:44 GMT+0000
From: ray.siat@xtra.co.nz
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: gagger
Message-ID: <20000725150138.UHUH1564298.mta4-rme.xtra.co.nz@smtp.xtra.co.nz>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Forget drugs.
1. Patient seated upright, not lying.
2. Cotton rolls with flavoring, not bonding frames.
3. Glass ionomer cement for bands.
4. Theta Dri-angle triangles over cheek salivary ducts.
and all will go well.

Date: Thu, 27 Jul 2000 00:02:35 +0300
From: Bracha & Eli Tal <betal@netvision.net.il>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714
Message-ID: <397F51EA.8680D675@netvision.net.il>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
 boundary="------------DF2C1B23124125F3A1DC41F6"

Use Nitrous Oxide (N2O)
Dr. Eli Tal

orthod-l@usc.edu wrote:

>                             ORTHOD-L Digest 714
>
> Topics covered in this issue include:
>
>   1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
>         by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
>   2) Anterior extraction
>         by iwire32@earthlink.net
>   3) Gagger
>         by "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
>   4) Webshots Photo Album
>         by druday@vsnl.com
>   5) Eureka Spring
>         by "Eugene Gottlieb" <egott@sedona.net>
>   6) Info management of future
>         by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
>   7) Bimler courses
>         by "Bimler" <101.238565@germanynet.de>
>   8) Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
>         by "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
>   9) Re: DIGITAL CAMERAS
>         by "Maurie Costello" <braces@costellodental.com.au>
>  10) Other Desital Camera
>         by "jun" <j-1@ijk.com>
>  11) Sony digital cameras
>         by "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
> Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 08:28:04 -0700
> From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
> To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
>
>
> Dear Colleague:
>
> The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
> exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
> distribution of professional information.
>
> * What information can you get on ESCO?
>
> * How to subscribe to ESCO?
>
> * How to change your address?
>
> * How to post messages on ESCO?
>
> For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
> http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm
>
> Enjoy!
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
> Professor, Department of Orthodontics
> University of Southern California
> http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/
>
> 21
>
>
>
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Anterior extraction
> Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 01:19:58 -0700
> From: iwire32@earthlink.net
> To: ESCO <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> My experience with lower incisor extractions has been favorable using
> immediate initiation of space closure following extraction and with
> rapid closure.  I have been able to finish with a good amount of
> tissue
> interproximally in what was the extraction site and the bone has
> looked
> good radiographically.
>
> But the current case in question has an almost full-size, erupted,
> supernumerary, maxillary central incisor.  The tooth in the midline is
> to be extracted because of its form and caries.  A consulting
> periodontist has suggested that the bone be allowed to fully
> reorganize
> before the adjacent teeth are moved into the extraction site.  I fear
> that a long wait will result in loss of both alveolar height and
> thickness and thereby cause a larger interproximal space in this
> aesthetically critical area.
>
> Any thoughts?  Please relate your practical experience (or reference
> to
> any articles) as to the speed with which anterior extraction spaces
> can
> or should be closed without causing problems to the periodontal
> ligaments.
>
> Art Kobal
> Thousand Oaks
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Gagger
> Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 16:03:59 -0400
> From: "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> Hi all,    I have a very nice, well adjusted, above average, twelve
> y.o. boy with a terrible gag reflex. We have gotten thru records and
> extractions but bonding has been very difficult. I have tried several
> different retractors trying to avoid placing anything on the roof or
> floor of the mouth (these areas seem to precip. an unwanted reflex). I
> am considering using a glass ionomer cement so moisture control will
> be easier. I was able to get brackets 3I3  and separators today
> without incidence (mom not feeding him prior to the appt is also a
> plus), next week is bands, then place lower bonds later. Any
> suggestions? drugs? hypnosis? Any and all recommendations
> welcome. Ernest McCallumGreenwood SC
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Webshots Photo Album
> Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 07:14:35 -0700
> From: druday@vsnl.com
> To: orthod-l@usc.edu
>
> Hi.
>
> Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your
> browser to this link:
>
> http://community.webshots.com/album/3180035DuTnnFwJSe
>
> Cheers,
> Dr.Uday
>
>
> _____________________________________
> Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
> FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now
>
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Eureka Spring
> Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 12:31:27 -0700
> From: "Eugene Gottlieb" <egott@sedona.net>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> Hi all!
>
> For those interested in the Eureka Spring and its source, there was an
> article entitled "The Eureka Spring" in the July 1997 issue of JCO,
> page
> 454.
>
> The source of the spring is Eurika Spring Company, 1312 Garden St.,
> San Luis
> Obispo, CA 93401.
>
> Gene Gottlieb
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Info management of future
> Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 09:52:33 -0400
> From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
> To: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> Do you think information management in orthodontic offices will use
> devices like the one below?   Another innovation is in screen
> technology.  Check out www.trivium.com/news/crains_june2000.htm
> Those interested in Trivium,  financially can contact Mr. David
> Kinsley at 1-914-767-0431. Ron ParsonsLawrenceville, GA [Image] The
> Shape of PCs to Come?
> Department: Technology & YouThe new Qbe tablet computer from Aqcess
> Technologies (www.qbenet.com) may be a harbinger of shapes to come.
> The Qbe relies on data-entry technologies that aren't quite ready for
> prime time and is further handicapped by some poor design choices, but
> it is an interesting design pioneer.
>
> The Qbe Cirrus that I tried is a box about 14 in. long, 10 in. wide,
> and 2 1/2 in. thick. The top is mostly covered by a 13.3-in.
> touch-sensitive display, and there's a built-in video camera at the
> top. The Qbe runs on a 400-MHZ Pentium II, features a 12-GB hard drive
> and 128 MB of RAM, and costs a steep $4,745. The less expensive
> Celeron-powered Genus model fetches $3,995. Both use Windows 98 and
> run standard PC software.
>
> The Qbe is designed to be used on your lap or any horizontal surface.
> It stands up with a removable prop called a "porticle," which includes
> a full complement of parallel, serial, and other ports. With the prop
> and a keyboard and mouse attached, the Qbe is basically a variation on
> the desktop PC. Used as a tablet, however, it's something quite
> different from either a desktop or a notebook.
>
> The problem is entering data. The Qbe offers three choices, none fully
> satisfactory. First, you can write on the screen with the pen, using
> ParaGraph's PenOffice software. Unfortunately, handwriting recognition
> doesn't work a lot better than it did in the days of Apple's
> much-ridiculed Newton. In the case of the Qbe, the accuracy problem is
> made worse by a noticeable delay before the writing actually appears
> on the screen. Having the option of a more accurate shorthand, like
> Palm's Graffiti, would be a big help.
>
> The second method is to use the speech-recognition software included
> with the Qbe--Lernout & Hauspie's Voice Xpress. It does pretty well
> after you invest some time in training, but to get it to work I had to
> use a Telex digital headset to bypass the apparently defective audio
> system.
>
> The final method is typing on a touch-sensitive keyboard that can pop
> up to cover the bottom quarter of the screen. The keys are big enough
> to hit with your fingers, and while touch typing is out of the
> question, the keyboard works well enough for limited amounts of data.
>
> COOLER, CHEAPER. Beyond the data-entry problems, the Qbe has some
> design issues. At six pounds, it weighs heavy on your lap, especially
> since the Pentium heats the magnesium case up to an uncomfortable
> temperature. The Qbe can run on battery power, but only for about 90
> minutes at a time, so you won't want to get very far from a power
> outlet. And this is a device that really wants a wireless connection
> to the Internet, since the tablet design is ideal for Web browsing.
>
> Better, lighter, cooler, and cheaper tablets are on the way. Aqcess
> hopes to have a three-pound, $1,500 unit this fall. Later this summer,
> Qubit Technology plans to ship a much-delayed 2 1/2- pound
> Web-browsing tablet featuring a wireless link to the Internet.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Bimler courses
> Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 10:25:45 -0700
> From: "Bimler" <101.238565@germanynet.de>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>, <laurent.gross@libertysurf.fr> - Dear
> Sirs: Maybe the included information is of interest for someone in
> your department. Thank you for your cooperation! "Bimler Courses"
> (July 2000) 11/12 August: Wiesbaden, Germany ("Weinwoche")September:
> Rio de Janeiro & Campinas, BrasilOctober: Tokyo, Japan13-19. November,
> La Habana, CubaNovember, Mexico City March  2001: Tokyo, Japan21-23
> June, Buenos Aires, Argentina4-6 July, Buenos Aires,
> ArgentinaSeptember, Tokyo, Japan Info: bimler@germnaynet.deTel.
> +49(611)304027 Fax ~377889 Sincerely yours, Dr. Barbara Bimler.
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
> Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 10:40:06 -0400
> From: "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> Hi all,
>
>  Last year I purchased an Olympus D620l (1.4 mp) camera. I have been
> extremely happy with this model. It is a SLR (thru lens focusing)
> camera,
> reachargeable batteries, screw on macro lens with flash diffuser, and
> a
> built in flash. Photos are very good even in the medium quality
> setting. I
> know this is not a 2.4 mp but has it has served me well. I wonder why
> Olympus has not made a high mp SLR camera? Or do they? Are the
> download
> times with a high mp camera greater than the increase in picture
> quality?
> Anyone have a comparison b/n quality in picture and download time. --
> Does
> it make a difference? I am downloading thru a floppy adapter -- which
> can be
> slow. Is anyone using a built in drive that accepts the flash cards?
> Where
> can you get one ? $$? Too many questions? All the best.
>
> Ernest McCallum
> Greenwood SC
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: DIGITAL CAMERAS
> Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2000 06:53:01 +1000
> From: "Maurie Costello" <braces@costellodental.com.au>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> Hey Guys: Why all this talk about the CoolPix?
>
> I did my homework over several months and last month took delivery of
> the
> BEST digital clinical camera I have ever had, to replace my aging Fuji
> 220.
>
> I bought a SONY DSD D770. It is a single-lens-reflex camera, auto or
> manual
> focus, completely programable or manually selectable, came with a ring
> flash
> which can be switched down to 1/16 power output for intraoral..in
> all...its
> is supurb.
>
> Unlike the Olympus 2500, the Sony can be used in EITHER viewfinder
> mode, or
> on the screen mode...while composing. Has instant playback.
>
> I purchased mine from Dolphin ...no financial interest.
>
> Have a look at the Sony: you will be pleased with what you see.
>
> Maurie Costello
> Orthodontist
> Australia
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Other Desital Camera
> Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 12:17:28 +0900
> From: "jun" <j-1@ijk.com>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> Dear Member
>
> I found Desital Camera for intro-Oral Photo.
> It is Fuji Fine Pix 2900Z with Original Ring Leight.(about 1800$)
>
> It can take a picture with X1/2-1 intra-oral photo.
> I hope that I take intra-oral photo and facial photo(x1/10).
>
> Please sent some information.
>
> Jun Matsumura
> Kanagawa Japan
> j-1@ijk.com
>
>
>
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Sony digital cameras
> Date: Sun, 23 Jul 2000 17:56:21 -0400
> From: "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> Anyone have experience with Sony cameras in the clinical area?
Use Nitrous Oxide (N2O)
Dr. Eli Tal

orthod-l@usc.edu wrote:

                           
ORTHOD-L Digest 714

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik
<orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Anterior extraction
        by iwire32@earthlink.net
  3) Gagger
        by "Ernest McCallum"
<emccallum@emeraldis.com>
  4) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
  5) Eureka Spring
        by "Eugene Gottlieb"
<egott@sedona.net>
  6) Info management of future
        by "Ron Parsons"
<ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  7) Bimler courses
        by "Bimler"
<101.238565@germanynet.de>
  8) Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
        by "Ernest McCallum"
<emccallum@emeraldis.com>
  9) Re: DIGITAL CAMERAS
        by "Maurie Costello"
<braces@costellodental.com.au>
 10) Other Desital Camera
        by "jun"
<j-1@ijk.com>
 11) Sony digital cameras
        by "Robert Pickron"
<pickron@speedfactory.net>

Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 08:28:04 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu

Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information.  

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: 
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. 
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

21





Subject: Anterior extraction
Date: Mon, 24 Jul 2000 01:19:58 -0700
From: iwire32@earthlink.net
To: ESCO <orthod-l@usc.edu>
My experience with lower incisor extractions has been favorable
using
immediate initiation of space closure following extraction and with
rapid closure.  I have been able to finish with a good amount of
tissue
interproximally in what was the extraction site and the bone has looked
good radiographically.

But the current case in question has an almost full-size, erupted,
supernumerary, maxillary central incisor.  The tooth in the midline
is
to be extracted because of its form and caries.  A consulting
periodontist has suggested that the bone be allowed to fully reorganize
before the adjacent teeth are moved into the extraction site.  I
fear
that a long wait will result in loss of both alveolar height and
thickness and thereby cause a larger interproximal space in this
aesthetically critical area.

Any thoughts?  Please relate your practical experience (or reference
to
any articles) as to the speed with which anterior extraction spaces can
or should be closed without causing problems to the periodontal
ligaments.

Art Kobal
Thousand Oaks


Subject: Gagger
Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 16:03:59 -0400
From: "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>

Hi all,    I have a very nice, well adjusted, above average, twelve y.o. boy with a terrible gag reflex. We have gotten thru records and extractions but bonding has been very difficult. I have tried several different retractors trying to avoid placing anything on the roof or floor of the mouth (these areas seem to precip. an unwanted reflex). I am considering using a glass ionomer cement so moisture control will be easier. I was able to get brackets 3I3  and separators today without incidence (mom not feeding him prior to the appt is also a plus), next week is bands, then place lower bonds later. Any suggestions? drugs? hypnosis? Any and all recommendations welcome. Ernest McCallumGreenwood SC 

Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 07:14:35 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your
browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/3180035DuTnnFwJSe

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
          
                    
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~
http://www.webshots.com/go?now



Subject: Eureka Spring
Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 12:31:27 -0700
From: "Eugene Gottlieb" <egott@sedona.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Hi all!

For those interested in the Eureka Spring and its source, there was an
article entitled "The Eureka Spring" in the July 1997 issue of
JCO, page
454.

The source of the spring is Eurika Spring Company, 1312 Garden St., San
Luis
Obispo, CA 93401.

Gene Gottlieb


Subject: Info management of future
Date: Sat, 22 Jul 2000 09:52:33 -0400
From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
To: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>

Do you think information management in orthodontic offices will use devices like the one below?   Another innovation is in screen technology.  Check out www.trivium.com/news/crains_june2000.htm   Those interested in Trivium,  financially can contact Mr. David Kinsley at 1-914-767-0431. Ron ParsonsLawrenceville, GA 1378e9a5.jpg The Shape of PCs to Come?
Department: Technology & YouThe new Qbe tablet computer from Aqcess Technologies (www.qbenet.com) may be a harbinger of shapes to come. The Qbe relies on data-entry technologies that aren't quite ready for prime time and is further handicapped by some poor design choices, but it is an interesting design pioneer.

The Qbe Cirrus that I tried is a box about 14 in. long, 10 in. wide, and 2 1/2 in. thick. The top is mostly covered by a 13.3-in. touch-sensitive display, and there's a built-in video camera at the top. The Qbe runs on a 400-MHZ Pentium II, features a 12-GB hard drive and 128 MB of RAM, and costs a steep $4,745. The less expensive Celeron-powered Genus model fetches $3,995. Both use Windows 98 and run standard PC software.

The Qbe is designed to be used on your lap or any horizontal surface. It stands up with a removable prop called a "porticle," which includes a full complement of parallel, serial, and other ports. With the prop and a keyboard and mouse attached, the Qbe is basically a variation on the desktop PC. Used as a tablet, however, it's something quite different from either a desktop or a notebook.

The problem is entering data. The Qbe offers three choices, none fully satisfactory. First, you can write on the screen with the pen, using ParaGraph's PenOffice software. Unfortunately, handwriting recognition doesn't work a lot better than it did in the days of Apple's much-ridiculed Newton. In the case of the Qbe, the accuracy problem is made worse by a noticeable delay before the writing actually appears on the screen. Having the option of a more accurate shorthand, like Palm's Graffiti, would be a big help.

The second method is to use the speech-recognition software included with the Qbe--Lernout & Hauspie's Voice Xpress. It does pretty well after you invest some time in training, but to get it to work I had to use a Telex digital headset to bypass the apparently defective audio system.

The final method is typing on a touch-sensitive keyboard that can pop up to cover the bottom quarter of the screen. The keys are big enough to hit with your fingers, and while touch typing is out of the question, the keyboard works well enough for limited amounts of data.

COOLER, CHEAPER. Beyond the data-entry problems, the Qbe has some design issues. At six pounds, it weighs heavy on your lap, especially since the Pentium heats the magnesium case up to an uncomfortable temperature. The Qbe can run on battery power, but only for about 90 minutes at a time, so you won't want to get very far from a power outlet. And this is a device that really wants a wireless connection to the Internet, since the tablet design is ideal for Web browsing.

Better, lighter, cooler, and cheaper tablets are on the way. Aqcess hopes to have a three-pound, $1,500 unit this fall. Later this summer, Qubit Technology plans to ship a much-delayed 2 1/2- pound Web-browsing tablet featuring a wireless link to the Internet.
 



 
 
 
 

Subject: Bimler courses
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 10:25:45 -0700
From: "Bimler" <101.238565@germanynet.de>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>, <laurent.gross@libertysurf.fr> - Dear Sirs: Maybe the included information is of interest for someone in your department. Thank you for your cooperation! "Bimler Courses"  (July 2000) 11/12 August: Wiesbaden, Germany ("Weinwoche")September: Rio de Janeiro & Campinas, BrasilOctober: Tokyo, Japan13-19. November, La Habana, CubaNovember, Mexico City March  2001: Tokyo, Japan21-23 June, Buenos Aires, Argentina4-6 July, Buenos Aires, ArgentinaSeptember, Tokyo, Japan Info: bimler@germnaynet.deTel. +49(611)304027 Fax ~377889 Sincerely yours, Dr. Barbara Bimler.

Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
Date: Tue, 18 Jul 2000 10:40:06 -0400
From: "Ernest McCallum" <emccallum@emeraldis.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Hi all,

 Last year I purchased an Olympus D620l (1.4 mp) camera. I have been
extremely happy with this model. It is a SLR (thru lens focusing) camera,
reachargeable batteries, screw on macro lens with flash diffuser, and a
built in flash. Photos are very good even in the medium quality setting. I
know this is not a 2.4 mp but has it has served me well. I wonder why
Olympus has not made a high mp SLR camera? Or do they? Are the download
times with a high mp camera greater than the increase in picture quality?
Anyone have a comparison b/n quality in picture and download time. -- Does
it make a difference? I am downloading thru a floppy adapter -- which can be
slow. Is anyone using a built in drive that accepts the flash cards? Where
can you get one ? $$? Too many questions? All the best.

Ernest McCallum
Greenwood SC


Subject: Re: DIGITAL CAMERAS
Date: Thu, 20 Jul 2000 06:53:01 +1000
From: "Maurie Costello" <braces@costellodental.com.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Hey Guys: Why all this talk about the CoolPix?

I did my homework over several months and last month took delivery of the
BEST digital clinical camera I have ever had, to replace my aging Fuji 220.

I bought a SONY DSD D770. It is a single-lens-reflex camera, auto or manual
focus, completely programable or manually selectable, came with a ring flash
which can be switched down to 1/16 power output for intraoral..in all...its
is supurb.

Unlike the Olympus 2500, the Sony can be used in EITHER viewfinder mode, or
on the screen mode...while composing. Has instant playback.

I purchased mine from Dolphin ...no financial interest.

Have a look at the Sony: you will be pleased with what you see.

Maurie Costello
Orthodontist
Australia


Subject: Other Desital Camera
Date: Fri, 21 Jul 2000 12:17:28 +0900
From: "jun" <j-1@ijk.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Dear Member

I found Desital Camera for intro-Oral Photo.
It is Fuji Fine Pix 2900Z with Original Ring Leight.(about 1800$)

It can take a picture with X1/2-1 intra-oral photo.
I hope that I take intra-oral photo and facial photo(x1/10).

Please sent some information.

Jun Matsumura
Kanagawa Japan
j-1@ijk.com 


   


Subject: Sony digital cameras
Date: Sun, 23 Jul 2000 17:56:21 -0400
From: "Robert Pickron" <pickron@speedfactory.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>

Anyone have experience with Sony cameras in the clinical area?
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2000 09:08:45 +1000
From: "Allan Ward" <award@albury.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Nikon Coolpix 990 or Olympus C 3030
Message-ID: <200007242304.JAA50927@giroc.albury.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



----------
> From: Ernest McCallum
>
>  Last year I purchased an Olympus D620l (1.4 mp) camera. I have been
> extremely happy with this model. It is a SLR (thru lens focusing) camera,
> reachargeable batteries, screw on macro lens with flash diffuser, and a
> built in flash. Photos are very good even in the medium quality setting.
I
> know this is not a 2.4 mp but has it has served me well. I wonder why
> Olympus has not made a high mp SLR camera? Or do they? Are the download
> times with a high mp camera greater than the increase in picture quality?

They make a 2.5 Mp SLR, the C2500L. Usually the viewfinder version of their
camera is released before the SLR version, so expect to see a 3.3Mp SLR
soon. I can't comment on download times by direct cable, but using a
compact flash card reader which fits into the USB port takes about 90
seconds for 96MB, that's about 160 2.5 M pixel JPG's.


> Anyone have a comparison b/n quality in picture and download time. --
Does
> it make a difference? I am downloading thru a floppy adapter -- which can
be
> slow. Is anyone using a built in drive that accepts the flash cards?
Where
> can you get one ? $$? Too many questions? All the best.
>
Mine cost about $120 Australian, about $70 US. I also bought a PCMCIA card
adapter which fits straight into the slot on a notebook for $25.

Regards

Allan Ward
Albury, NSW
Australia
Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2000 08:19:15 -0500
From: "Dietmar Kennel" <Pediatric.Dentist@usa.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714 digital cameras
Message-ID: <002601bff63b$0668d460$e6d4c2d0@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I use a Coolpix 990.

-In my experience the camera is extremely easy to use once you have
established your Manual settings for exposures. Resolution does allow you to
use the digital zoom beyond the normal tele.
-The camera is very portable (important for me to be able to take to the
o.r.)
-Image quality is satisfactory (I don't think anything can beat the qualtiy
of my 35mm Minolta bellows with Washington Scientific flash).
-I am glad I don't have to deal with a ring-flash (dull lighting and
ring-highlights on pictures), one of the biggest misconceptions in close-up
and macro-photography ("you need a ring-flash"), NO YOU DON'T WANT ONE.
-Viewfinder? I don't use it - I use the LCD screen which is basically TTL,
no problems here.
-Batteries? No experienced problems so far (2-3 months, 500 pictures), I
carry a second set of fully charged NiMH with me all the time (two sets of
NiMH and a 12Vcharger in the car), never ran out of power without backup.
-download time? What is that? I use a PCMCIA adapter for my laptop, there is
no download time, the computer reads the flashcard as drive E, access time
is as fast as I can imagine. I have never used the USB port or "god forbid"
the serial connector. Image sizes are typically a little over 1MB,
downloading must be a pain.
-card size? I use a 64MB Delrin, That gives me ca. 50 pictures at fine
resolution.
-how does it compare to other cameras? I don't know, screw on lens adapters
are not necessary though (=better optical quality and versatility), no
ring-flash (=better close-up flash, except you can't rotate it), small and
compact to carry (personally I like the rotating body, allows me to take
shots no other camera can).

That's my impression, I am sure this is not the camera for everybody, but it
is one of the better ones. I recommend it, it surpassed my expectations and
seems to fit my needs.


Dietmar Kennel DDS
South Plains Pediatric Dental Group
Lubbock, Texas

www.MyPediatricDentist.com


Date: Tue, 25 Jul 2000 21:28:21 -0500
From: Ormond Grimes <ogrimes@internetpro.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714-Eureka Spring
Message-ID: <397E4CC2.A2CA1CD6@internetpro.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I used the Eureka Spring for uncooperative patients for a while with
mediocre success.  I have had much better success with what is called
the "Outrigger" from TP Orthodontics.  It reminds patients to wear their
elastics by being uncomfortable if they don't.  It is "guaranteed" to
work by TP.  It is the best thing that I have come across!  Orm
--
Orm's Web Site is <http://www.Rainbow-Ortho.org>
Mailto:HeyOrm@Orthodontist.net
Embedded Content: 1378e9a5.jpg: 00000001,62312b58,00000000,00000000 Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\CWINDOWSTEMPnsmailFP1.gif" ORTHOD-L Digest 716 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik Date: Fri, 11 Aug 2000 15:58:31 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000811155831.007bcaf0@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 23 ORTHOD-L Digest 717 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) impacted molars by LevittTA@aol.com 3) eagle's syndrome by Priscila Lima Ribeiro 4) Can you help me find... by Milo and John McGowan 5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 715-Eureka Spring by Ormond Grimes 6) Article: Mar AJODO Vol. 117 no.3 by Drted35@aol.com 7) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714 digital cameras by "Paul M. Thomas" 8) Sony Mavica FD-88 by paulo18@juno.com 9) RE: Computer adapter for PCMCIA, etc. by "Darick Nordstrom" 10) Mounting cases by Scott Smoron 11) Scheduling by "Kevin C. Walde" 12) SF Gate: Errant E-Mails Violate Privacy of Kaiser Members by "Stan Sokolow, DDS" Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2000 18:46:40 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000814184640.0085c100@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 24 Date: Mon, 31 Jul 2000 20:00:41 EDT From: LevittTA@aol.com To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: impacted molars Message-ID: <97.8dfc876.26b76d29@aol.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit IT SEEMS THAT WE HAVE GOTTEN MANY PATIEINTS WITH IMPACTED, POSSIBLY ANKYLOSED UPPER AND LOWER MOLARS LATELY. IN SOME OF THE CASES, ESPECIALLY THE LOWERS, THE ALVEOLUS ISN'T DEVELOPED EITHER. ANY SUGGESTIONS ON WHAT TO DO WITH THESE TEETH. TERRY L. Date: Wed, 02 Aug 2000 22:48:49 -0300 From: Priscila Lima Ribeiro To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: eagle's syndrome Message-ID: <3988CF81.167C@nitnet.com.br> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hello Group A friend asked me about eagle syndrome, what is it, I remember reading somewhere about it, its about a bone in the face that grows more than it should and causes a lot of pain, but I don't remember which bone it is. Can anyone help me? Thank you Priscila Date: Sat, 05 Aug 2000 09:13:50 -0700 From: Milo and John McGowan To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU Subject: Can you help me find... Message-ID: MIME-version: 1.0 Content-type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit ...I am looking for information on a procedure called Distract Oesteogenisis? Besides my poor spelling, can you direct me to educate myself. Notice: Please respond to my email address (not the one listed on this sent email): mcgowanb@pacbell.net Sincerely, Barbara McGowan Date: Wed, 02 Aug 2000 20:07:34 -0500 From: Ormond Grimes To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 715-Eureka Spring Message-ID: <3988C5D3.84C323A4@internetpro.net> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I had a problem finding my last post. I have tried Eureka Springs with only fair success. I have had more success with TP's "Outrigger". It "reminds" the patient to wear the elastics. Check it out. Orm -- Orm's Web Site is Mailto:HeyOrm@Orthodontist.net Date: Fri, 4 Aug 2000 15:12:59 EDT From: Drted35@aol.com To: ALifshitz@compus, APlastSurg@aol.com, DArick6217@aol.com, ParkSlopeOMS@aol.com, papamamadoc@msn.com, Subject: Article: Mar AJODO Vol. 117 no.3 Message-ID: <42.8eeb637.26bc6fbb@aol.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Dear Colleagues The authors of the article noted below are pleased to announce that this article can be seen in toto on the internet at: http://www.drted.com/index.html/Part I ajodo size form and position.htm The dental and facial skeletal characteristics and growth of males and females with Class II, division 1 malocclusion between the ages of 10 and 14 (revisited) -- Part I: Characteristics of size, form and position by Ted Rothstein DDS, PhD and Cecile Yoon-Tarlie DDS, MS, as it appeared in the American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, March 2000, Vol. 117, No. 3, pp. 320-332, and reproduced with permission from Mosby, Inc., Aug. 2nd 2000. This copyrighted material may be used for personal use only and may not be distributed further. http://www.drted.com/index.html/Part I ajodo size form and position.htm Date: Tue, 1 Aug 2000 06:14:24 -0400 From: "Paul M. Thomas" To: "Dietmar Kennel" , Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714 digital cameras Message-ID: <004b01bffba1$44b87930$460f1918@paultower> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit The ring versus point flash argument is an emotional one based on personal preference and perception of the viewer.....so there *are* people who may prefer one versus the other. We expose (no pun intended) our grad students to both options rather than brainwash them that one or the other is superior. Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS Adjunct Associate Professor Orthodontics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill, NC ----- Original Message ----- From: "Dietmar Kennel" To: Sent: Tuesday, July 25, 2000 9:19 AM Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 714 digital cameras > I use a Coolpix 990. > > -In my experience the camera is extremely easy to use once you have > established your Manual settings for exposures. Resolution does allow you to > use the digital zoom beyond the normal tele. > -The camera is very portable (important for me to be able to take to the > o.r.) > -Image quality is satisfactory (I don't think anything can beat the qualtiy > of my 35mm Minolta bellows with Washington Scientific flash). > -I am glad I don't have to deal with a ring-flash (dull lighting and > ring-highlights on pictures), one of the biggest misconceptions in close-up > and macro-photography ("you need a ring-flash"), NO YOU DON'T WANT ONE. > -Viewfinder? I don't use it - I use the LCD screen which is basically TTL, > no problems here. > -Batteries? No experienced problems so far (2-3 months, 500 pictures), I > carry a second set of fully charged NiMH with me all the time (two sets of > NiMH and a 12Vcharger in the car), never ran out of power without backup. > -download time? What is that? I use a PCMCIA adapter for my laptop, there is > no download time, the computer reads the flashcard as drive E, access time > is as fast as I can imagine. I have never used the USB port or "god forbid" > the serial connector. Image sizes are typically a little over 1MB, > downloading must be a pain. > -card size? I use a 64MB Delrin, That gives me ca. 50 pictures at fine > resolution. > -how does it compare to other cameras? I don't know, screw on lens adapters > are not necessary though (=better optical quality and versatility), no > ring-flash (=better close-up flash, except you can't rotate it), small and > compact to carry (personally I like the rotating body, allows me to take > shots no other camera can). > > That's my impression, I am sure this is not the camera for everybody, but it > is one of the better ones. I recommend it, it surpassed my expectations and > seems to fit my needs. > > > Dietmar Kennel DDS > South Plains Pediatric Dental Group > Lubbock, Texas > > www.MyPediatricDentist.com > > > Date: Sat, 5 Aug 2000 23:47:37 -0400 From: paulo18@juno.com To: pickron@speedfactory.net, orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Sony Mavica FD-88 Message-ID: <20000805.234738.-397859.0.paulo18@juno.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I have been using the Sony Mavica FD-88 for over 1 year now with excellent results. It can be found now, due to the new models, for about $400-500. It takes an ordinary floppy disc and on the medium size and fine setting will hold approximately 10 pictures(an orthodontic series of 8 easily). This allows my assistants to write the patients name on a piece of tape and label each floppy for later down-loading(no confusion with multiple patient down-loads). Picture quality is very good. Rechargeable 179min battery. Automatic focus setting is easy. Some quirks I have found: 1 I have taped a white paper label over the flash(which is set to on) to filter it's power. 2 The macro setting must be on all the time. 3 Because the flash is on the side of the camera it must be held upside down on the left buccal shot to not cause a shadow from the cheeck. 4 Finally I've found the best place for the zoom is just above the lightning bolt from the flash (if you have the camera you'll know what I mean). Has anyone tried any of the new Sony's. Paulo Nogueira DMD, MSD Pediatric Dental Health Care North Attleboro, MA ________________________________________________________________ YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET! Juno now offers FREE Internet Access! Try it today - there's no risk! For your FREE software, visit: http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj. Date: Wed, 2 Aug 2000 00:37:12 -0700 From: "Darick Nordstrom" To: Subject: RE: Computer adapter for PCMCIA, etc. Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I use the DataChute by Antec in my office computer. Then I plug into it the PCMCIA to Compact Flash or Memory Stick adapters. Cheap, Quick, Easy, except needs an available 5" bay and interrupt. Darick Date: Fri, 04 Aug 2000 15:06:27 -0500 From: Scott Smoron To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Mounting cases Message-ID: <000201bffe6c$8bd86140$b26e86a5@slu.edu> MIME-version: 1.0 Content-type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit To those out there mounting their cases: What articulator are you using? How many do you have (and is this number associated with number of case starts)? Are you mounting at T2 to check for interferences? Do you mount strip models? Also, if you've gone through multiple articulator brands, I'd love to hear about your different experiences. I have seen the thread die and no one really answered those questions. If you wish to reply direct, smoronsg@slu.edu Date: Wed, 09 Aug 2000 21:47:32 -0500 From: "Kevin C. Walde" To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Scheduling Message-ID: <399217BF.FCF9359D@usmo.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hello all, I am currently trying to adjust my daily schedule in an effort to become more efficient. I would appreciate knowing how much time the ESCO members allow in their schedules for initial appliance placement. If you are able to help please also let me know what you accomplish at this appointment, ie. direct or indirect bonding?, any bands?, home care instructions?, fluoride varnish?, etc. Thanks for any help. Happy Trails, Kevin Walde Washington, MO (the Corn Cob Pipe Capital of the World) Date: Thu, 10 Aug 2000 07:57 -0700 From: "Stan Sokolow, DDS" To: "List members" Subject: SF Gate: Errant E-Mails Violate Privacy of Kaiser Members Message-ID: Content-type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Mime-version: 1.0 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit The risks of communicating with patients by email. Does malpractice insurance cover it? ---------------------------------------------------------------------- This article was sent to you by someone who found it on SF Gate. The original article can be found on SFGate.com here: http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2000/08/10/MN56245.DTL ---------------------------------------------------------------------- August 10, 2000 (SF Chronicle) Errant E-Mails Violate Privacy of Kaiser Members Janet Wells, Chronicle Staff Writer Regional -- Kaiser Permanente violated the patient confidentiality of hundreds of members last week when e-mails containing sensitive medical information, names and home phone numbers were mistakenly sent to the wrong people, Kaiser officials disclosed yesterday. In a glitch that raises privacy concerns, a programming error occurred August 2 at a Maryland Web site server facility that Kaiser uses for its online service. Kaiser On-Line lets members ask for medical and pharmaceutical advice and schedule appointments. The error affected 858 members before Kaiser's online support crew caught the mistake and shut down the program. Had the tech workers not spotted the problem, it could have affected more than 8,000 members who were receiving e-mail responses at the time. Kaiser officials spent the past week calling all 858 members and apologizing, said Kaiser spokeswoman Beverly Hayon. "Some are upset," Hayon said of members' responses. "The vast majority have been gracious." More than 400 of the misdirected e-mails were intended for Kaiser members in California, said Hayon, who characterized the error as an isolated incident that has been rectified. "What we're talking about is nothing that breached security of Kaiser On-Line. No hacker, no virus," Hayon said. FUTURE CONCERNS Privacy experts, however, say the incident raises concerns about the safety of online medical services -- especially with the health care industry pushing digital medical care as "the new frontier" to cut costs and improve access, said Earl Lui, senior attorney with the Consumer Advocacy Organization in San Francisco. "It's an example of what could go wrong when you rely on technology rather than people seeing people. This would not have happened if these people had come in and seen a nurse or called a nurse," he said. "When you lose that human element, errors like this can happen." The error happened while Kaiser -- the nation's second-largest health insurance plan -- was doing a routine capacity upgrade of the online system, which is attracting 20,000 new members a month, said Anna- Lisa Silvestre, director of Kaiser Permanente On-Line. About 250,000 of Kaiser's 8 million members nationwide have signed up for the interactive site, which allows free access to health care news and chat rooms, as well as medical and pharmaceutical advice and appointment clerks. The site conducts about 8,400 transactions a month, mostly in scheduling appointments. A notice on the Web site assures privacy, reading, "We are dedicated to keeping your personal health information confidential. We take many precautions to make sure others can't pretend to be you and get your confidential information from this Web site." However, during the system upgrade, a technical problem occurred that interrupted delivery of about 8,000 e-mails, Silvestre explained. Since Kaiser Permanente On-Line has promised to respond to e-mail queries within 24 hours, technicians quickly wrote a program to resend the e-mails. On August 2, about 20 minutes after the send program was initiated, a technician noticed an error and stopped the transmission. WRONG E-MAIL ADDRESS Kaiser didn't know about the ramifications of the error until the next day when a member reported that she had received a response to her question -- along with messages intended for several hundred other Kaiser members. The member was one of 19 people who received 20 to 400 messages not intended for them. Kaiser said most of the e-mails were about routine matters. However, at least one of the e-mails was a response to a member's question about a sexually transmitted disease, the Washington Post reported. Kaiser On-Line is conducting a "root cause analysis" to determine the source of the problem, which will help determine procedures to prevent a similar mistake, Silvestre said. Because of lower costs, increased accuracy and convenient access to health care, online medical services are "the future of health care," said Sam Karp, chief information officer for the California Health Care Foundation, which funds health care research and did a landmark study on Internet privacy. While Kaiser's mistake "raised an alarm" concerning security and safeguards in online health services, Karp praised the HMO as a pioneer in the industry. "We're seeing the early pains of a new health care system emerging," Karp said. "I certainly hope the (Kaiser) incident won't discourage providers from offering (online services) or consumers from using it." Problems with privacy in the health care arena existed "before we had all these new technologies," said Daniel Zingale, director of the state's new Department of Managed Care, who also has high hopes for online health services benefiting the public. "Privacy is one area of legitimate concern, but it can be addressed," he said. "It's like the automobile industry. You don't want to stop building cars because of break-ins -- you want to build them with locks." E-mail Janet Wells at wellsj@sfgate.com. ---------------------------------------------------------------------- Copyright 2000 SF Chronicle
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 718

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 717
        by "Kevin C. Walde" <parrothd@usmo.com>
  3) distraction osteogenesis
        by elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
  4) RE:  Distraction Osteogenesis in Orthodontics
        by "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
  5) Re: Scheduling
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  6) sony
        by elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
  7) Board Certified Orthodontic Treatment
        by Scott Smoron <smoronsg@SLU.EDU>
  8) Dentoptix vs. Digident CR
        by MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
  9) Tip Edge orthodontist in Toronto
        by "Allan Ward" <award@albury.net.au>
 10) mounting cases...new tricks for an old dog
        by Drted35@aol.com
 11) Re: Mounting cases
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 12) Eagle's syndrome  Reply
        by "Dr.SAJI C.ABRAHAM" <sajic32@yahoo.com>
 13) (no subject)
        by DrHarrell@aol.com
 14) Re: eagle's syndrome
        by "Dr.SAJI C.ABRAHAM" <sajic32@yahoo.com>
 15) RE: Can you help me find...
        by "Rodrigo Boos" <boos@conex.net>
 16) Eagle's Syndrome
        by DrHarrell@aol.com
 17) Eagle's Syndrome
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
 18) eagle syndrom
        by elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
 19) Re: eagle's syndrome
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 20) Eagle's Syndrome
        by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
 21) Eagle Syndrome
        by "Kevin Deeny" <niti234@mail.gisco.net>
 22) Re: eagle syndrome
        by "Y.Bar-Zion" <orthodontics2000@hotmail.com>
 23) Epidermolysis Bullosa
        by "William F. Denny, D.D.S." <wmdenny@macs.com>
 24) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
 25) Webshots Photo Album
        by druday@vsnl.com
Date: Fri, 18 Aug 2000 11:28:40 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000818112840.007bc290@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

25






Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 21:47:07 -0500
From: "Kevin C. Walde" <parrothd@usmo.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 717
Message-ID: <399A00A8.E5214494@usmo.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

RE: Impacted molars without alveolus

Sounds like "primary failure to erupt".  The only publication I know of on the subject is
by Proffit, in both a journal (I believe the AJO) and also mentioned in one of his texts.
It's tough to treat because the molars won't move and teeth posterior to the affected tooth
will also be affected.  It's believed that there is a defect in the eruption mechanism.

Good luck,

Kevin Walde
Washington, MO

Date: Wed, 16 Aug 2000 14:21:00 -0400 (EDT)
From: elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
Subject: distraction osteogenesis
Message-ID: <384109463.966450061137.JavaMail.root@web313-mc.mail.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

to barbara mcgowan,
visit this web site :
http://www.oraldistraction.com/
it's very interesting.
good luck.
ELI AMM,
Lebanon.


______________________________________________
FREE Personalized Email at Mail.com
Sign up at http://www.mail.com/?sr=signup

Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 07:10:21 -0700
From: "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
To: mcgowanb@packbell.net
Cc: "orthod-l@usc.edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE:  Distraction Osteogenesis in Orthodontics
Message-ID: <39994F4D.3932F069@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

You can find a good introduction to distraction osteogeneis at:
http://www.globalmednet.com/do/lectures.htm
Other references can be found by searching for "distraction osteogenesis
orthodontics" in www.google.com

Stan Sokolow, DDS

Date: Wed, 16 Aug 2000 18:35:16 -0400
From: Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Scheduling
Message-ID: <399B1724.FFC4BA19@utoronto.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Two comments: (1) Everyone does things differently. Different techniques,
different approaches and different speeds (times) to do similar procedures.
Better to monitor your own work habits and find average times for your
common procedures. (2) Ultimately you depend on other people (your patients)
to fall in line with your schedule. They don't know it; don't understand it
and have their own lives to lead in which they try to fit in your
appointments. And sometimes the weather blows your day all to hell! Get used
to the idea that the best schedule never works the way it's designed because
of outside effects over which you have no control. Relax. TGS.

"Kevin C. Walde" wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> I am currently trying to adjust my daily schedule in an effort to become
> more efficient.  I would appreciate knowing how much time the ESCO
> members allow in their schedules for initial appliance placement.  If
> you are able to help please also let me know what you accomplish at this
> appointment, ie. direct or indirect bonding?, any bands?, home care
> instructions?, fluoride varnish?, etc.  Thanks for any help.
>
> Happy Trails,
>
> Kevin Walde
> Washington, MO  (the Corn Cob Pipe Capital of the World)

Date: Wed, 16 Aug 2000 14:32:54 -0400 (EDT)
From: elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: sony
Message-ID: <383186688.966450775701.JavaMail.root@web313-mc.mail.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

to paolo,
you have to try the new sony DSC-D770. i think it's the best till now
regarding its price.
Elie Amm,
Lebanon.


______________________________________________
FREE Personalized Email at Mail.com
Sign up at http://www.mail.com/?sr=signup

Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2000 16:24:49 -0500
From: Scott Smoron <smoronsg@SLU.EDU>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Board Certified Orthodontic Treatment
Message-ID: <002a01c00636$48dfc8c0$876e86a5@slu.edu>
MIME-version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

This might sound like a strange request, but...

I need an orthodontist who fits all of the following:

    1)  Board Certified (ABO)
    2)  Practices in a pre-adjusted appliance
    3)  Full start and strip records taken (models + ceph)
    4)  200 starts a year or more

You will have to do nothing except allow me access to your records.
Basically, I want to look at treatment time duration.

The ABO is for credentials, pre-adjusted is now the norm, I need the records
for comparison, and the 200 starts a year are so I can get the cases I need
to fall within a 5 year period in your practice (fewer changes in practice
philosophy).

At present, I can get 3 out of 4 easily with many practitioners, but I am
running into trouble getting all four.

If even remotely interested, contact me.  I'll give you more details
one-on-one.  If nothing else, you'll have someone give you alot more info
about your practice approach.

scott smoron
smoronsg@slu.edu
314-324-6362

Date: Thu, 17 Aug 2000 09:14:14 -0700
From: MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
To: Electronic Study Club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Dentoptix vs. Digident CR
Message-ID: <399C0F56.BA8D2152@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
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Hi All:

I am getting ready to make the plunge and convert to phosphorous
technology.  I was ready to plunk down the $21K for the Dentoptix when I
received the brochure on Wehmer's Digident CR.  It processes faster,
erases the screen during the process and costs $8K less.  Is it too good
to be true or is the Dentoptix overpriced (this is a given)?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.  BTW, I am not interested in
going to pure digital at this time so my choices are one of the above.

Thanks in advance,

Mark

--
Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@gate.net

Lively Orthodontics
Stuart,  Florida


Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2000 08:47:32 +1000
From: "Allan Ward" <award@albury.net.au>
To: "ESCO" <ORTHOD-L@usc.edu>
Subject: Tip Edge orthodontist in Toronto
Message-ID: <200008132242.IAA62609@giroc.albury.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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Dear Colleagues

I have a patient moving to Port Credit, Mississagua, Toronto in early 2001.
I would be grateful if anyone practices in this area, or knows of someone
in this area to drop me a line.

Thanks in anticipation

Allan Ward
Orthodontist
Albury, NSW
Australia
award@albury.net.au
Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 09:26:06 EDT
From: Drted35@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: mounting cases...new tricks for an old dog
Message-ID: <6d.8043cd2.26ca9eee@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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Dear Colleagues,
    I have always resisted the tempatation to mount my cases on an
articulator. In fact I still have my H-2 Hanau from dental school (1965). The
only part that was misssing was the front pin which I ordered anew. Indeed
there in the "back" I even found the face-bow and bite fork.  My staff was
bewildered and curious as to what the contraption was used for.  Being a
teacher at heart I proceeded to explain the vagaries of habitual centric
occlusion as compared to muscular guided centric relation. I lold them how
the articualator was supposed to mimic the patient's jaws in relation to
their TMJ and how it could sometimes show up a patient's "true" bite rather
than the one the they us.  That conversation led to talk about how error was
introduced when taking a wax bite on a facebow bite fork. Indeed I recalled
the need to "deprogram" the bite just before taking the bite. So I come to
you desiring to know how you "deprogram" the bite and the methods "you" use
to capture a centric related bite with a facebow bite fork.  I am going to
show my staff just how much fun it can be.
Will you please refresh my memory regarding the specifics of these tasks. 
Thanking you in advance for your kind help.  Sincerly, old dog.
Date: Wed, 16 Aug 2000 20:49:23 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Scott Smoron" <smoronsg@SLU.EDU>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Mounting cases
Message-ID: <02b501c007e4$fc2f2560$6e0f1918@paultower>
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Maybe there's a subliminal message here....

    -=Paul=-

Paul M. Thomas




> I have seen the thread die and no one really answered those questions.
>
> If you wish to reply direct, smoronsg@slu.edu
>
>

Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 14:03:21 +0300
From: "Dr.SAJI C.ABRAHAM" <sajic32@yahoo.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Cc: <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
Subject: Eagle's syndrome  Reply
Message-ID: <001501c006a8$ae01cd80$962c47d4@one>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_000B_01C006C1.91EDA7E0"

----- Original Message -----
From: "Priscila Lima Ribeiro" <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2000 4:48 AM
Subject: eagle's syndrome


> Hello Group
>
> A friend asked me about eagle syndrome, what is it,  I remember reading
> somewhere about it, its about a bone in the face that grows more than it
> should and causes a lot of pain, but I don't remember which bone it is.
> Can anyone help me?
> Thank you
> Priscila
>
Dear Doctor
Ref:-'Eagles syndrome'
Is the pain associated with the elongated styloid process,has beeen
characterised as severe ,unilateral pain radiating from ear to neck.The
pain is most commonly brought on by swallowing or by turning the head.
The patient may express the feeling that a foregin object is lodged in the
throat.A radiograph that shows an elongated styloid process in a symptomatic patient  confirms the diagnosis
Thank you
Dr.SAJI C.ABRAHAM
Orthodontist



Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 08:34:14 EDT
From: DrHarrell@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: (no subject)
Message-ID: <99.8ded7ad.26ca92c6@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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To let everyone in our group know
Dr. Ormond Grimes is the State of Alabama Amateur Golf Champ (OVER 65).
Wow Orm did not know you were that OLD.!!!!!!
 Bill Harrell
Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 14:04:11 +0300
From: "Dr.SAJI C.ABRAHAM" <sajic32@yahoo.com>
To: "Priscila Lima Ribeiro" <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
Cc: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: eagle's syndrome
Message-ID: <001601c006a8$b011c1c0$962c47d4@one>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Doctor
Ref:-'Eagles syndrome'
Is the pain associated with the elongated styloid process,has beeen
characterised as severe ,unilateral pain radiating from ear to neck.The
pain is most commonly brought on by swallowing or by turning the head.
The patient may express the feeling that a foregin object is lodged in the
throat.A radiograph that shows an elongated styloid process in a symptomatic
patient  confirms the diagnosis
Thank you
Dr.SAJI C.ABRAHAM
Orthodontist


----- Original Message -----
From: "Priscila Lima Ribeiro" <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, August 03, 2000 4:48 AM
Subject: eagle's syndrome


> Hello Group
>
> A friend asked me about eagle syndrome, what is it,  I remember reading
> somewhere about it, its about a bone in the face that grows more than it
> should and causes a lot of pain, but I don't remember which bone it is.
> Can anyone help me?
> Thank you
> Priscila
>




_________________________________________________________
Do You Yahoo!?
Get your free @yahoo.com address at http://mail.yahoo.com

Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 09:16:11 -0300
From: "Rodrigo Boos" <boos@conex.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Cc: <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
Subject: RE: Can you help me find...
Message-ID: <004e01c006b2$a1ebbba0$7f80e4c8@notebooksalab>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
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Dear Priscila,

I just opened the digest this morning.

As I recall the Eagle Sindrome involves the calcification of the
estilomandibular ligament. The estiloid process seems elongated in the Rx.
It will probably cause pain when opening the mouth. During the day I may get
some more info. You may contact me directly if you wish.

Dr. Rodrigo Boos.
www.cyberdoc.com.br


> by Priscila Lima Ribeiro <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
>   4) Can you help me find...


Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 08:26:36 EDT
From: DrHarrell@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Eagle's Syndrome
Message-ID: <31.8de8ce1.26ca90fc@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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TO: Priscila
RE: Eagle's Syndrome
Eagle's Syndrome is an elongation and ossification of the  Stylohyoid
Ligament. It can cause 1. Ear & throat pain 2. Sense of foreign object in
throat, 3. Pain on palpation
There is a high correlation between degenerative arthritis of the TMJ of the
same side and calcification of the Stylohyoid ligament on AP radiograph.
Sometimes the ossified ligament will fracture and continue to grow and the
radiographs show what appears to be bone as large as a finger with knuckling
(pseudoarthrosis) extending from the styloid process downward to the hyoid
bone. Sometimes you can see the calcification on a lateral Ceph. extending
from the styloid process to hyoid bone.

Bill Harrell
Date: Tue, 15 Aug 2000 17:22:45 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Eagle's Syndrome
Message-ID: <60.6060de1.26cb0ea5@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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Date: Wed, 02 Aug 2000 22:48:49 -0300
From: Priscila Lima Ribeiro <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: eagle's syndrome
Message-ID: <3988CF81.167C@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello Group

>>>A friend asked me about eagle syndrome, what is it,  I remember reading
somewhere about it, its about a bone in the face that grows more than it
should and causes a lot of pain, but I don't remember which bone it is.
Can anyone help me?


Eagle's Syndrome, according to Jim Fricton, Co-Director of the Pain Center of
the U of Minnesota, is due to a calcified stylohyoid ligament.  It usually
can be seen on a panoramic radiograph.

It mimics a glossopharyngeal neuralgia in presentation.  Certain movements of
the jaw will trigger a sharp pain in the lateral pharyngeal area as the boney
ligament rubs on soft tissue.

Surgical excison is the tx of choice.

Warm regards

Charlie Ruff
Date: Wed, 16 Aug 2000 14:15:20 -0400 (EDT)
From: elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: eagle syndrom
Message-ID: <387016278.966449720753.JavaMail.root@web135-mc.mail.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

to priscillia,
the eagle syndrom is the calcification of the stylo-hyoide ligament. we can
see it in a panoramic rx.
regards.
Elie Amm, DDS
3rd year resident
Beirut, Lebanon.


______________________________________________
FREE Personalized Email at Mail.com
Sign up at http://www.mail.com/?sr=signup

Date: Wed, 16 Aug 2000 20:44:12 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Priscila Lima Ribeiro" <danrac@nitnet.com.br>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: eagle's syndrome
Message-ID: <02a901c007e4$433bbbe0$6e0f1918@paultower>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Styloid process elongation and calcification leads to glossopharyngeal
neuralgia...burning and strange sensations in the throat and neck when the
patient turns their head.  Treatment is fracture or resection of the styloid
process.

    -=Paul=-

Paul M. Thomas


----- Original Message -----
From: "Priscila Lima Ribeiro" <danrac@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, August 02, 2000 9:48 PM
Subject: eagle's syndrome


> Hello Group
>
> A friend asked me about eagle syndrome, what is it,  I remember reading
> somewhere about it, its about a bone in the face that grows more than it
> should and causes a lot of pain, but I don't remember which bone it is.
> Can anyone help me?
> Thank you
> Priscila
>

Date: Thu, 17 Aug 2000 08:04:34 -0500
From: "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Eagle's Syndrome
Message-ID: <00a101c0084b$b7bc1520$8b2c1ec8@default>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_009C_01C00821.C815F8C0"

Dear Priscila,
The Eagle's Syndrome has to do with the styloid process of the Temporal bone.  It happnes when this styloid process growth more than it should, like a big nail, and the patient contact the tip of the styloid process with the interior anlge of the mandibule when opening. This might be painfull. I don't know how to treat this syndrome.
I hope this information will help you.
Sincerly,
Carlos E. Gomez
Manizales,Colombia
Date: Thu, 17 Aug 100 14:46:05 -0400
From: "Kevin Deeny" <niti234@mail.gisco.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Eagle Syndrome
Message-ID: <200008171446937.SM00155@mail.gisco.net>

---------- Original Message ----------------------------------
Seem to recall the culprit being a calified Stylo-Hyoid Ligament that
binds when turning the head.  I'm probably wrong but thought this
might be a start for you.


Sincerely,


Kevin W. Deeney, DDS



Date: Fri, 18 Aug 2000 09:37:02 -0700
From: "Y.Bar-Zion" <orthodontics2000@hotmail.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: eagle syndrome
Message-ID: <OE45LJDoRkJihMQYFdO0000103f@hotmail.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

hi priscila,

eagle's syndrome: elongated styloid process and/or ossified stylohyoid
ligament WITH symptoms

you can search for eagle's syndrome at  http://www.dentalmedline.com
at the search line type  "eagle syndrome"  (use the quotations marks...) you
will find about 114 publications on the syndrome... some of these
manuscripts can be ordered from the AAO's librarian...

Electronically accessing the scientific literature: web-based MEDLINE
searches.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 1999 Aug;116(2):229-31.


----- Original Message -----
From: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
To: "Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, August 15, 2000 2:34 AM
Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 717

Hello Group

A friend asked me about eagle syndrome, what is it,  I remember reading
somewhere about it, its about a bone in the face that grows more than it
should and causes a lot of pain, but I don't remember which bone it is.
Can anyone help me?
Thank you
Priscila
Date: Sat, 12 Aug 2000 10:51:21 -0700
From: "William F. Denny, D.D.S." <wmdenny@macs.com>
To: <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: Epidermolysis Bullosa
Message-ID: <006e01c00485$eedb8820$2a8074d1@tustin>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0069_01C0044B.40745D00"

Dear Group:
 
I have a patient with Epidermolysis Bullosa and obvious oral lesions. Extractions will be part of the treatment plan.
 
Has anyone had orthodontic experience with this type of patient?
 
Thank you in advance.
 
William F. Denny, D.D.S.
Orthodontist
La Jolla, California
Date: Sun, 13 Aug 2000 01:49:55 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Message-ID: <200008130849.BAA13508@p6.webshots.com>

Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/3820950OpjJZgqkPi

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
         
                   
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now


Date: Mon, 14 Aug 2000 22:17:10 -0700
From: druday@vsnl.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Webshots Photo Album
Message-ID: <200008150517.WAA14482@p3.webshots.com>

Hi.

Have a look at these photos on the Webshots Community.  Point your browser to this link:

http://community.webshots.com/album/3884936nxbLeuyaOU

Cheers,
Dr.Uday
         
                   
_____________________________________
Put Incredible Photos On Your Desktop
FREE ~ http://www.webshots.com/go?now

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 719

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Wisdom teeth to replace 7's
        by "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
  3) Cherubism
        by "David M. Lebsack" <dml-4266@ccp.com>
  4) Amelogenesis Imperfecta
        by "Karen Brook" <karen.brook@clear.net.nz>
  5) Re: impacted molars
        by "Dr.M.Jayaram" <mjayaram@vsnl.com>
  6) Hodgkins Disease
        by Michael Kirshon <mkirshon@bigpond.net.au>
  7)
        by "kevin kaller" <kpk@attcanada.net>
  8) orthodontic treatment in hemangioma?
        by "Mohammadi Amir" <mohammadia@tbzmed.ac.ir>
  9) class III
        by "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
 10) transeptal fibers
        by "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
 11) eagle is flying
        by "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
 12) Wanted Qume Terminals
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
 13) RE: Nuremberg
        by "DR.OMAR RECIO MOLINA" <omar@mcsa.net.mx>
Date: Mon, 28 Aug 2000 15:48:45 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000828154845.0087a280@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

26


Date: Sat, 19 Aug 2000 21:57:44 +0800
From: "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Wisdom teeth to replace 7's
Message-ID: <007a01c009e5$734d9940$93de15a5@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear group;

I would like to know what is your experience and opinion in dragging up
horizontally impacted wisdom teeth (upper and lower) to replace badly
carious or restored second molars (upper and lower) in an adult of late
20's.  Overall dentition is of severe crowding in the upper and lower jaws
with poor long term prognosis of the second molars.  What difficulties do
you normally encounter with uprighting horizontally impacted wisdom teeth?

I would also like to know whether there's any one out there in Huston who
practices lingual orthodontics as I have a patient who might be posted to
Huston, Texas for a period of years.  I do appreciate if you could contact
me.

Once again thank you.

Tengku
tbspll88@singnet.com.sg

Date: Sat, 19 Aug 2000 09:45:33 -0500
From: "David M. Lebsack" <dml-4266@ccp.com>
To: "orthod-l@usc.edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Cherubism
Message-ID: <399E9D93.2F173456@ccp.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Does anyone have experience with orthodontic patients with cherubism?

Or do you know of any articles in the literature that has an extensive
literature review of cherubism?

David M. Lebsack DDS MS

Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 11:40:21 +1200
From: "Karen Brook" <karen.brook@clear.net.nz>
To: "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Amelogenesis Imperfecta
Message-ID: <000001c00a36$d7b74d80$0f3661cb@karen>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I hope to start treatment on a 12 year old with ameliogenesis Imperfecta -it
is the variant which has a very very thin layer of enamel but with minimal
pitting. - classic anterior spacing, small stubby central incisors etc. I
need just to align the upper anterior to maximize the chance for good
restorative options in the future.

Had any on successfully bonded such cases. If so what bonding system did you
use?
 - with thanks

Karen Brook

Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 09:30:20 +0530
From: "Dr.M.Jayaram" <mjayaram@vsnl.com>
To: <LevittTA@aol.com>
Cc: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: impacted molars
Message-ID: <001801c00a5c$6c4c90c0$21e2d4d2@h3f6i2>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
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Dear Group members,
                                Dr. Levitt's kind attention is drawn to an
article in AJODO-1999(Dec)116:651-8"Eruption diturbances of the first and
second molars:Results of treatment in 43 cases":By Eduard
Valmaseda-Castellon et.al
        The results do not appear very encouraging, but still in such cases
where most odds are against orthodontic success, something is better than
nothing.

        Currently we do have two cases under treatment wherein all the three
lower molars on both sides are impacted.
                                sincerely,
                            Dr. M. Jayaram
                           Dept of Orthodontics,
                           Govt. Dental College,
                            CALICUT-673 008
                            Kerala, INDIA
----- Original Message -----
From: <LevittTA@aol.com>
To: <ORTHOD-L@usc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, August 01, 2000 5:30 AM
Subject: impacted molars


> IT SEEMS THAT WE HAVE GOTTEN MANY PATIEINTS WITH IMPACTED, POSSIBLY
ANKYLOSED
> UPPER AND LOWER MOLARS LATELY. IN SOME OF THE CASES, ESPECIALLY THE
LOWERS,
> THE ALVEOLUS ISN'T DEVELOPED EITHER. ANY SUGGESTIONS ON WHAT TO DO WITH
THESE
> TEETH.
>
> TERRY  L.
>

Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 12:48:44 +1000
From: Michael Kirshon <mkirshon@bigpond.net.au>
To: Orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Hodgkins Disease
Message-ID: <4.3.2.7.1.20000825123326.00bf2320@pop-server>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Dear all,

I saw a NEW patient today (26 year old female) who has a history of
recurring Hodkins (Jaw /lungs).
She has in the past undergone extensive radiation to the jaw, prior to
which her third molars were prophylactically removed. She was then told not
to have any further extractions done for fear of poor healing etc.
She has also had "accelerated menopause" prophylactically induced.

She recently had a "Dexa test" done and was told that she has a significant
risk of developing Osteoporosis (?later in life).

ORTHODONTICALLY, she has upper and lower crowding which could be resolved
with fixed appliance therapy together with judicious interproximal stripping.

My question to the group is this:

"Are there any contraindications to treatment given both the irradiated
bone and susceptibility towards osteoporosis ? "

I would appreciate any thoughts/comments/experiences.

Thank you

MICHAEL KIRSHON
ORTHODONTIST
MELBOURNE AUSTRALIA


Date: Sat, 26 Aug 2000 22:48:22 -0400
From: "kevin kaller" <kpk@attcanada.net>
To: "Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Message-ID: <00d001c00fd1$fe439f80$b0dcc28e@attcanada.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_00BB_01C00FAF.BCE9B460"

Dear Colleagues:
 
I am wondering if any of you has had experience treating osteoporotic patients.  We have a 55 year old lady about to start orthodontic treatment requiring maxillary and mandibular tooth removal.  She has been told that she has the bone density of an 80 year old woman.  She is controlling the osteoporosis through medication, and bone density scans have shown stability over the last 2 years.  Any input or references on the subject would be greatly appreciated.
 
Thank you.
kevin kaller
 
Date: Sun, 27 Aug 2000 09:54:27 +0430
From: "Mohammadi Amir" <mohammadia@tbzmed.ac.ir>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: orthodontic treatment in hemangioma?
Message-ID: <001301c00fe7$15e95890$e480a8c0@dfen9p09xub19m>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0010_01C0100C.C9CE0CF0"

hello
  is orthodontics treatment indicate in hemangioma patient with hemangioma in face and haif maxilla ?
                                                         reagards:mohammadi
Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 16:50:31 -0300
From: "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: class III
Message-ID: <003401c00adf$e903d0a0$760efea9@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0031_01C00AC6.C0927540"

Hello,
 
Here is the case.
Boy, 11 years , just finish tx, non extraction. At the beginning he was edge to edge anterior, ANB 0, AO-BO class III,  Used some class III elastics and finished ok,  ANB almost 2,  AO-Bo continuis class III,  Has good profile.
What worries me:
being a boy, will grow ( and I heard in Chicago that boys mandible reflects growth in a more horizontal way, that's being the reason more boys become class III)
has a mandibular angle opened
the condile is pointing backwards.
(lots of "bad"indications of poor grower)
I'm thinking about giving him a chim cup for sleep for some nights. 
Any thougths?
Priscila
 
Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 16:53:49 -0300
From: "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: transeptal fibers
Message-ID: <003d01c00ae0$5f5482e0$760efea9@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_003A_01C00AC7.37158220"

Hello
 
I"m thinking about asking to liberate the transeptal fibers of a central incisor I wish to know in what moments should I ask for that procedure?
Before , during and after finish tx or just during.
Priscila
Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 16:42:56 -0300
From: "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: eagle is flying
Message-ID: <002b01c00ade$db726a60$760efea9@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0028_01C00AC5.B1A9BC60"

Hello Group
 
To everyone that so kindly help me , THANK YOU.  With such an interested group I feel part of the world.
 
Priscila
Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 08:01:17 -0400
From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
To: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>,
        "OrthAlliance Study Club" <ORAL@listbot.com>
Subject: Wanted Qume Terminals
Message-ID: <000701c00a9e$595c36e0$b4c4fea9@g48sy>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0004_01C00A7C.D188CD80"

I am looking for Qume 101 or 101+  terminals (work stations)
including broken terminals.  Please email if interested.
 
Ron Parsons
Atlanta, GA  
 
Date: Fri, 25 Aug 2000 12:51:18 -0500
From: "DR.OMAR RECIO MOLINA" <omar@mcsa.net.mx>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: Nuremberg
Message-ID: <003701c00ebd$15493160$232f21c8@Igrodri.mcsa.net.mx>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit


To whom it may concern:
I have a patient who needs to be transfered to an orthodontist in Nürnberg,
Germany, Does anyone one  out there could recommend me one? The patient is
under fixed appliances therapy Alexander Technique .018.
Thanks in advance
Omar Recio
Saltillo, Coah.
Mexico

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 720

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) chin cup for sleep as a retainer
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
  3) Re: Wisdom teeth to replace 7's
        by "Eric R. Brannon DDS" <erb@wvadventures.net>
  4) Getting Dental Implants and Informed Consent for 1 hour Teeth Whitening
        by Drted35@aol.com
  5) Ameleogenisis imperfecta
        by paulo18@juno.com
  6) hemangioma??
        by "Mohammadi Amir" <mohammadia@tbzmed.ac.ir>
  7) Mail Scam targeting dentists
        by Runquistbp@aol.com
  8) help for software!
        by "Ivan Dr. Squadrani" <ivansq@tin.it>
Date: Wed, 06 Sep 2000 17:49:36 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000906174936.007af3a0@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

27





Date: Tue, 29 Aug 2000 17:53:06 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: chin cup for sleep as a retainer
Message-ID: <ee.9f4d3bc.26dd8ac2@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 16:50:31 -0300
From: "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: class III
Message-ID: <003401c00adf$e903d0a0$760efea9@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
    boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0031_01C00AC6.C0927540"

This is a multi-part message in MIME format.

------=_NextPart_000_0031_01C00AC6.C0927540
Content-Type: text/plain;
    charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable

Hello,

Here is the case.
Boy, 11 years , just finish tx, non extraction. At the beginning he was =
edge to edge anterior, ANB 0, AO-BO class III,  Used some class III =
elastics and finished ok,  ANB almost 2,  AO-Bo continuis class III,  =
Has good profile.
What worries me:
being a boy, will grow ( and I heard in Chicago that boys mandible =
reflects growth in a more horizontal way, that's being the reason more =
boys become class III)
has a mandibular angle opened
the condile is pointing backwards.
(lots of "bad"indications of poor grower)
I'm thinking about giving him a chim cup for sleep for some nights. =20
Any thougths?
Priscila

Dear P,

First thought-  you just finished tx and now your going to give him a
headgear?  And you think he will wear it?
Second thought- if you knew he was class III, why did you treat him so early?
 To have finished treatment on an 11 year old boy with class III potential
staggers my imagination.  Why not let him grow and revisit around age 14 or
older to see how much class III and how much vertical is going to actually
occur?

This reminds me of a transfer case I just received.  Same age as your
patient.  In braces for a year and strong class III potential.  Tall parents
and the patient had clearly not begun to grow when I first met him.  Short of
cold steel, there is little I can do to prevent future class III growth. 
Having the braces on for it makes it look like the underbite was my fault ---
"happened while he was wearing braces, doc"  My treatment plan was to suggest
that the best approach in this case was to remove the braces and restart in
several years.  Mother's comment:  "Good, I always thought that other
orthodontist was too anxious to get the braces on."

Growth can help us in class II patients but not in class III patients.  Why
make life harder than it has to be?  Treat class II during growth and class
III's after growth.  I'm not the brightest bulb in the lamp, but I figured
that one out.

Charlie Ruff
Date: Tue, 29 Aug 2000 23:13:04 -0400
From: "Eric R. Brannon DDS" <erb@wvadventures.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Wisdom teeth to replace 7's
Message-ID: <009801c01230$734b0380$176dfea9@erb>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Tengku:
It's been our experience that disto-angular upper 3rds can reliably replace
extracted 7's with little intervention needed. If they are mesio-angular,
they can be tough, but not impossible.  Lowers, especially mesio-angular
ones with complete root development are a pain in the <expletive
suppressed>!

You mentioned severe crowding present--- assuming healthy joints that don't
need maximal posterior support, why not remove the 7's AND 8's and just
distalize to alleviate the crowding??

Just my 2 cents worth.......

Eric

The Tooth, the Whole Tooth and Nuttin' But the Tooth!!

----- Original Message -----
On Saturday, August 19, 2000 @ 9:57 AM Tengku Sinannaga wrote:

> Dear group;
>
> I would like to know what is your experience and opinion in dragging up
> horizontally impacted wisdom teeth (upper and lower) to replace badly
> carious or restored second molars (upper and lower) in an adult of late
> 20's.  Overall dentition is of severe crowding in the upper and lower jaws
> with poor long term prognosis of the second molars.  What difficulties do
> you normally encounter with uprighting horizontally impacted wisdom teeth?
>
> I would also like to know whether there's any one out there in Huston who
> practices lingual orthodontics as I have a patient who might be posted to
> Huston, Texas for a period of years.  I do appreciate if you could contact
> me.
>
> Once again thank you.
>
> Tengku
> tbspll88@singnet.com.sg
>

Date: Fri, 1 Sep 2000 09:43:26 EDT
From: Drted35@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Getting Dental Implants and Informed Consent for 1 hour Teeth Whitening
Message-ID: <9d.a33cc41.26e10c7e@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Escovians,
    All of us as orthodontists must at times convey information about the
need for bridges or implants to our patients. I recently completed (Sept 7th)
the implant-crown procedure on myself (9 and 10), and I fully documented this
experience including photos. I learned alot to say the least. It can be seen
at my website www.drted.com  (Home page: "getting dental implant surgery") 
You  might find it useful to refer patients to this URL when you want to be
informative without mincing words:  <A
HREF="http://www.drted.com/index.html/Getting_Dental_Implant_Surgery.htm">http
://www.drted.com/index.html/getting dental implant surgery.htm</A>   In
addition, I have just added to the site the "Informed Consent" for the one
hour  tooth whitening which I offer in my office. For those of you are
considering offer that "profit center" to your list of services, it will save
you some effort by reviewing the one I provide to my patients. Here is the
URL: <A HREF="http://www.drted.com/index.html/teeth whitening Informed
consent.htm">http://www.drted.com/index.html/teeth whitening Informed
consent.htm</A>  Cordially, Ted
Date: Wed, 30 Aug 2000 16:59:15 -0400
From: paulo18@juno.com
To: karen.brook@clear.net.nz, orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Ameleogenisis imperfecta
Message-ID: <20000830.181824.-156613.2.paulo18@juno.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am currently treating a patient with ameleogenisis imperfecta. The
areas that have enamel hold the brackets just fine.  However, I have had
a few brackets come off due to enamel chipping. Replacement of the
bracket on another area of the tooth has resolved that problem. I
recommend Reliance Assure bonding system(but I'm sure any system will
work). It is currently the strongest bonding system I know of and very
resonably priced (speak to Paul Gange).
Paulo Nogueira DMD, MSD

________________________________________________________________
YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!
Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!
Try it today - there's no risk!  For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.
Date: Tue, 29 Aug 2000 13:43:45 +0430
From: "Mohammadi Amir" <mohammadia@tbzmed.ac.ir>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: hemangioma??
Message-ID: <001001c01199$73d6f670$e680a8c0@dfen9p09xub19m>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_000D_01C011BF.270A8340"

hello
     is orthodontic treatment could indicate in hemangioma patientwith maxillary involvment?
                                                     regards:mohammadi
Date: Wed, 30 Aug 2000 00:32:19 EDT
From: Runquistbp@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Mail Scam targeting dentists
Message-ID: <5e.a00ec.26dde853@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Here in Northern California, in the Sacramento area in particular, our dental
society sent out a warning for a potential mail scam targeting dentists.  I
personally got such a bill and after I gave it a second thought (and fished
it out of the trash) I gave a call to the BBB, but the line was busy
(probably other dentists doing the exact same thing!)  It then sat on my desk
and then tonight I get this e-mail from my local society.
Watch what you write checks for!  This is their warning (from the Sacramento
District Dental Society) : 
"We have been contacted by several member dentists today about a bill for

waste collections for $49.00 on Account # 000177631 from "General Help,

Inc., 4809 Avenue N  P.O. Box PMB 127, Brooklyn NY  11234.  This bill has

the same account number on it for all offices it was mailed to and same

amount owing.  It has been forwarded to the US Postmaster for follow up.  We

would just like to have you spread the word to fellow colleagues."
BJ Runquist
Orthodontist
Davis CA
Date: Wed, 30 Aug 2000 17:38:11 +0200
From: "Ivan Dr. Squadrani" <ivansq@tin.it>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: help for software!
Message-ID: <002d01c01298$565ae3e0$7589d8d4@tex>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have a problem with my orthodontic software "the prescription planner" by
Rx Data Design Inc..
I can't find help in Italy.
There are colligues who can help me to discover if the company, which
licensed the software, is now out of business?
ORTHOD-L Digest 721 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719 by "Tim and Debbie Alford" 3) Re: Amelogenesis Imperfecta by "Peter De Wilde" 4) invsalign by g russell frankel 5) Re: chin cup for sleep as a retainer by Ted Schipper 6) Re: chin cup for sleep as a retainer by "Paul M. Thomas" 7) Re: Wisdom teeth to replace 7's by "Paul M. Thomas" 8) DxWorkbench software by "Javier Ibañez Brambila" 9) OPMS Dos to Oasys? by Alex Cassinelli Date: Sun, 10 Sep 2000 14:56:47 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000910145647.007beb70@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 28 Date: Sun, 03 Sep 2000 13:02:15 +0000 From: "Tim and Debbie Alford" To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719 Message-ID: <200009031740.NAA59282@mx2.mx.voyager.net> Mime-version: 1.0 Content-type: multipart/alternative; boundary="MS_Mac_OE_3050830936_81122_MIME_Part" Karen: I have treated only two patients with this condition. On both occasions we bonded we there was enough enamel and banded bi's through molars where most enamel had stripped. Usually I would not bond on "thin enamel" , however, according the the IUSD Dept of Oral Pathology, most of these patients will need comprehensive restorative procedures as the enamel fails. Considering this, I'm not sure I would bond, as this may lead to earlier than necessary prosthetics. If the teeth are to be rebuilt soon after your treatment I don't see a problem with direct bonding. ---------- >From: orthod-l@usc.edu >To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics >Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 719 >Date: Tue, Aug 29, 2000, 9:34 AM > Date: Sun, 3 Sep 2000 02:23:58 +0200 From: "Peter De Wilde" To: Subject: Re: Amelogenesis Imperfecta Message-ID: <003a01c015e9$ba87d040$280a0201@peter> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit Dear Karen, I am treating a family 3 childeren of which present with a severe form of congenital amelogenesis imperfecta. The eldest, a girl, terminated treatment 2 years ago. She originally presented with a huge Cl.II/1 deep bite malocclusion, overbite of 10 mm and 3 missing second premolars, projected on a skeletal Cl.I. The enamel malformation was apparent on all teeth, some of which showed spots of no enamel covarage at all. She was conventionally bonded with a no-mix adhesive (Relyabond). The brackets on the enamel deficient teeth came off almost immediately, an had to be replaced by cemented bands. The treatment of the second child, a boy with a similar malocclusion, is still in progress. In contrast with his sister he presents with an enamel pattern similar to the one you discribed in your patiënt: a full coverage by a thin yellowish enamel layer with minimal pitting. After phosphoric acid etching (35%) a typical dull pattern of decalcification was clearly visible. His case was set up by means of a light cured adhesive (Transbond) and so far no abnormal bonding failures were recorded, apart from one that could be asociated with the extreme deep bite pattern. The youngest brother will get his braces in the near future. His teeth present with the same promissing enamel type as the older boy. So, without any doubt I will just glue them on! Peter De Wilde, Wetteren, Belgium ----- Original Message ----- From: Karen Brook To: ESCO Sent: Sunday, August 20, 2000 1:40 AM Subject: Amelogenesis Imperfecta > I hope to start treatment on a 12 year old with ameliogenesis Imperfecta -it > is the variant which has a very very thin layer of enamel but with minimal > pitting. - classic anterior spacing, small stubby central incisors etc. I > need just to align the upper anterior to maximize the chance for good > restorative options in the future. > > Had any on successfully bonded such cases. If so what bonding system did you > use? > - with thanks > > Karen Brook > > Date: Tue, 05 Sep 2000 22:36:38 -0400 From: g russell frankel To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: invsalign Message-ID: <39B5ADB6.FE2E2CC4@cinci.rr.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign? g. russell frankel cincinnati Date: Wed, 06 Sep 2000 22:36:03 -0400 From: Ted Schipper To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: chin cup for sleep as a retainer Message-ID: <39B6FF13.A5AB7F6C@utoronto.ca> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I agree. And even if he wears the chin cup (would you?) the best you'll get is some more mand. rotation and an open bite. Take a rest, see him once or twice a year, and re-evaluate at age 15-18. TGS. Orthodmd@aol.com wrote: > Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 16:50:31 -0300 > From: "Rachel Ribeiro" > To: > Subject: class III > Message-ID: <003401c00adf$e903d0a0$760efea9@nitnet.com.br> > MIME-Version: 1.0 > Content-Type: multipart/alternative; > boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0031_01C00AC6.C0927540" > > This is a multi-part message in MIME format. > > ------=_NextPart_000_0031_01C00AC6.C0927540 > Content-Type: text/plain; > charset="iso-8859-1" > Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable > > Hello, > > Here is the case. > Boy, 11 years , just finish tx, non extraction. At the beginning he was = > edge to edge anterior, ANB 0, AO-BO class III, Used some class III = > elastics and finished ok, ANB almost 2, AO-Bo continuis class III, = > Has good profile. > What worries me: > being a boy, will grow ( and I heard in Chicago that boys mandible = > reflects growth in a more horizontal way, that's being the reason more = > boys become class III) > has a mandibular angle opened > the condile is pointing backwards. > (lots of "bad"indications of poor grower) > I'm thinking about giving him a chim cup for sleep for some nights. =20 > Any thougths? > Priscila > > Dear P, > > First thought- you just finished tx and now your going to give him a > headgear? And you think he will wear it? > Second thought- if you knew he was class III, why did you treat him so early? > To have finished treatment on an 11 year old boy with class III potential > staggers my imagination. Why not let him grow and revisit around age 14 or > older to see how much class III and how much vertical is going to actually > occur? > > This reminds me of a transfer case I just received. Same age as your > patient. In braces for a year and strong class III potential. Tall parents > and the patient had clearly not begun to grow when I first met him. Short of > cold steel, there is little I can do to prevent future class III growth. > Having the braces on for it makes it look like the underbite was my fault --- > "happened while he was wearing braces, doc" My treatment plan was to suggest > that the best approach in this case was to remove the braces and restart in > several years. Mother's comment: "Good, I always thought that other > orthodontist was too anxious to get the braces on." > > Growth can help us in class II patients but not in class III patients. Why > make life harder than it has to be? Treat class II during growth and class > III's after growth. I'm not the brightest bulb in the lamp, but I figured > that one out. > > Charlie Ruff Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 07:44:51 -0400 From: "Paul M. Thomas" To: , Subject: Re: chin cup for sleep as a retainer Message-ID: <03fe01c0198a$32febb30$a9111918@paultower> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I agree with Charles 100% on this one. Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS Adjunct Associate Professor Orthodontics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill, NC ----- Original Message ----- From: To: Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2000 5:53 PM Subject: chin cup for sleep as a retainer > Date: Sun, 20 Aug 2000 16:50:31 -0300 > From: "Rachel Ribeiro" > To: > Subject: class III > Message-ID: <003401c00adf$e903d0a0$760efea9@nitnet.com.br> > MIME-Version: 1.0 > Content-Type: multipart/alternative; > boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0031_01C00AC6.C0927540" > > This is a multi-part message in MIME format. > > ------=_NextPart_000_0031_01C00AC6.C0927540 > Content-Type: text/plain; > charset="iso-8859-1" > Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable > > Hello, > > Here is the case. > Boy, 11 years , just finish tx, non extraction. At the beginning he was = > edge to edge anterior, ANB 0, AO-BO class III, Used some class III = > elastics and finished ok, ANB almost 2, AO-Bo continuis class III, = > Has good profile. > What worries me: > being a boy, will grow ( and I heard in Chicago that boys mandible = > reflects growth in a more horizontal way, that's being the reason more = > boys become class III) > has a mandibular angle opened > the condile is pointing backwards. > (lots of "bad"indications of poor grower) > I'm thinking about giving him a chim cup for sleep for some nights. =20 > Any thougths? > Priscila > > Dear P, > > First thought- you just finished tx and now your going to give him a > headgear? And you think he will wear it? > Second thought- if you knew he was class III, why did you treat him so early? > To have finished treatment on an 11 year old boy with class III potential > staggers my imagination. Why not let him grow and revisit around age 14 or > older to see how much class III and how much vertical is going to actually > occur? > > This reminds me of a transfer case I just received. Same age as your > patient. In braces for a year and strong class III potential. Tall parents > and the patient had clearly not begun to grow when I first met him. Short of > cold steel, there is little I can do to prevent future class III growth. > Having the braces on for it makes it look like the underbite was my fault --- > "happened while he was wearing braces, doc" My treatment plan was to suggest > that the best approach in this case was to remove the braces and restart in > several years. Mother's comment: "Good, I always thought that other > orthodontist was too anxious to get the braces on." > > Growth can help us in class II patients but not in class III patients. Why > make life harder than it has to be? Treat class II during growth and class > III's after growth. I'm not the brightest bulb in the lamp, but I figured > that one out. > > Charlie Ruff > Date: Fri, 8 Sep 2000 07:43:18 -0400 From: "Paul M. Thomas" To: "Eric R. Brannon DDS" , Subject: Re: Wisdom teeth to replace 7's Message-ID: <03f901c01989$fbae1e00$a9111918@paultower> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Or....why not consider implants. I would be the fee for a couple of implants wouldn't be that different from prolonged ortho necessary to resurrect impacted 8's and I bet it would be a more certain fix. The implants could be placed (with proper planning) and used to distalize and relieve crowding once they were integrated and restored. Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS Adjunct Associate Professor Orthodontics and Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery UNC School of Dentistry Chapel Hill, NC ----- Original Message ----- From: "Eric R. Brannon DDS" To: Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2000 11:13 PM Subject: Re: Wisdom teeth to replace 7's > Tengku: > It's been our experience that disto-angular upper 3rds can reliably replace > extracted 7's with little intervention needed. If they are mesio-angular, > they can be tough, but not impossible. Lowers, especially mesio-angular > ones with complete root development are a pain in the suppressed>! > > You mentioned severe crowding present--- assuming healthy joints that don't > need maximal posterior support, why not remove the 7's AND 8's and just > distalize to alleviate the crowding?? > > Just my 2 cents worth....... > > Eric > > The Tooth, the Whole Tooth and Nuttin' But the Tooth!! > > ----- Original Message ----- > On Saturday, August 19, 2000 @ 9:57 AM Tengku Sinannaga wrote: > > > Dear group; > > > > I would like to know what is your experience and opinion in dragging up > > horizontally impacted wisdom teeth (upper and lower) to replace badly > > carious or restored second molars (upper and lower) in an adult of late > > 20's. Overall dentition is of severe crowding in the upper and lower jaws > > with poor long term prognosis of the second molars. What difficulties do > > you normally encounter with uprighting horizontally impacted wisdom teeth? > > > > I would also like to know whether there's any one out there in Huston who > > practices lingual orthodontics as I have a patient who might be posted to > > Huston, Texas for a period of years. I do appreciate if you could contact > > me. > > > > Once again thank you. > > > > Tengku > > tbspll88@singnet.com.sg > > > > Date: Thu, 07 Sep 2000 15:19:42 -0500 From: "Javier Ibañez Brambila" To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU Subject: DxWorkbench software Message-ID: <20000907201947.CMOU16059.mta08.onebox.com@onebox.com> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit MIME-Version: 1.0 Does anybody knows, what about the ceph software dxWorkbench? the page http://home.earthlink.net/~ceph/ is out of order, What´s happen with this software? -- Dr. Javier Ibanez Brambila shark123@zdnetonebox.com - email ___________________________________________________________________ To get your own FREE ZDNet Onebox - FREE voicemail, email, and fax, all in one place - sign up today at http://www.zdnetonebox.com Date: Fri, 08 Sep 2000 01:12:50 -0400 From: Alex Cassinelli To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU Subject: OPMS Dos to Oasys? Message-ID: <4.2.0.58.20000908010654.00998740@pop3.choice.net> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed My partners and I are currently comparing OPMS and OASYS as an upgrade from OPMS Dos. Has anyone in the group specifically moved from OPMS Dos to OASYS? OASYS is currently the most likely choice for many reasons. Any positive or negative comments would be very helpful. Responses also accepted to my e-mail @ alexc@choice.net. Thanks in advance, Alex West Chester Orthodontics Drs. Starnbach, Biddle, and Cassinelli Alexander G. Cassinelli, D.M.D., M.S. Practice limited to Orthodontics. Office: (513)-777-7060 Fax: (513)-777-0716
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 722

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Invisalign
        by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  3) Re: invsalign
        by "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
  4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
        by "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
  5) 3d occlusogram
        by Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
        by George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
  7) Patient to London
        by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
  8) Re: corso di bio1
        by webmaster@siob.it
Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 11:20:44 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000915112044.0087fe60@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/


29






Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 06:26:44 -0500
From: John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
To: Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <39BCC174.11BA144E@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------F9985A73C7BC7DB551BFFB60"

How about a general comment on Invisalign.  Who thinks it will be with us 2 years from now and who will be left holding the bag?

John Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
Peoria, IL
 
 

anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign?
g. russell frankel
cincinnati
 
 
Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 09:31:56 -0600
From: "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: invsalign
Message-ID: <000701c01c05$6b7ad480$e4d52dc7@frontier.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

ouch....but predictable when the $8 million line of credit comes due.
vaughn johnson
durango, co
----- Original Message -----
From: "g russell frankel" <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2000 8:36 PM
Subject: invsalign


> anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign?
> g. russell frankel
> cincinnati
>
>

Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 09:46:08 +1000
From: "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
Message-ID: <NEBBLCPHELDIPJMCPGCPKEGMCAAA.braces@bigpond.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am about to embark on a software project involving "Automated
Cephalometric Landmark recognition".

I am curious as to whether there would be a demand for such software.  I
have been following the research and papers on this subject for about 10
years and it appears that like voice recognition it may be more trouble than
it is worth.  For example with voice recognition the "teaching" curve is so
steep that it is still easier to use a Dictaphone and a typist with some
good word processing/correspondence software linked to a practice/patient
management package.  Not to mention the plethora of "manual" transcription
services that are now available on the net.

Given that you can now digitise and analyse a ceph within 5 minutes and
often a procedure that can be delegated to auxiliaries - would I be right in
assuming that Automated Landmark recognition would only be useful in a
research environ involving large samples?

Is anyone else working on such a project?

Dr John Mamutil
Orthodontist
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
www.brace5.com






Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 18:10:38 -0700
From: Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
Subject: 3d occlusogram
Message-ID: <39BD828E.9B8825B0@turbonet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Does anyone have any experience with Medi-dent's 3D occlusogram program?
Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 12:23:09 +0800
From: George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
Message-ID: <39C1A42C.60A097CE@netvigator.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Group,

I have heard of this HYCON Device. Dose anyone has experience in using
it to close space? Where can I purchase it?

George Wang
Hong Kong

Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2000 08:02:25 -0500
From: "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Patient to London
Message-ID: <000901c01cb9$b7ffdc60$8d2c1ec8@default>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0006_01C01C8F.C9BBC100"

I am an orthodontist from Manizales,Colombia. One of my patients is leaving to London and I would like to know if there is any of you who could teke her as a patient and finish her treatment (Straight Wire Technique)
I'll apprecaite your help.
Carlos E. Gomez
Date: Thu, 14 Sep 2000 08:37:32 +0200
From: webmaster@siob.it
To: <webmaster@siob.it>
Subject: Re: corso di bio1
Message-ID: <001c01c01e16$93b154c0$0200a8c0@udmfb>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/related;
        type="multipart/alternative";
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0018_01C01E27.06AFDB80"

 

 
13795da1.jpg
L USO DEL PENDOLO DI HILGERS NEL CONTESTO DELLA MECCANICA BIOPROGRESSIVA
 
nuova pubblicazione del dottor Daniele Razzani all'indirizzo
http://digilander.iol.it/lunasido/siob/fb/pub20/default.htm

 

 

     Ugo De Marinis (webmaster sito siob)
                webmaster@siob.it
     http://www.siob.it
home page http://www.mclink.it/personal/MC2445
 mail personale udmbg@mclink.it
home page english version
   http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Spa/1751
international mail ugodemarinis@tiscalinet.com
Embedded Content: 13795da1.jpg: 00000001,11b2f272,00000000,00000000 Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\biglogo2.jpg"
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 723

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics September
 2000, Vol. 118, No. 3
        by "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
  3) RE: ORTHOD-L digest 722
        by Zia Chishti <zia@aligntech.com>
  4) invisalign
        by "Jean-Marc Retrouvey" <jean-marc.retrouvey@sympatico.ca>
  5) Re: Invisalign
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  6) Invisalign
        by "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
  7) RE: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
        by "Williams, Bryan" <bwilli@chmc.org>
  8) Re: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  9) Re: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
        by "Greg Nalchajian" <g.nalchajian.ortho@worldnet.att.net>
 10) Wisdom tooth to replace 7's
        by "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
 11) 3d Occlusogram
        by David Taylor <david_226@altavista.com>
 12) Mapping software
        by MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
 13) Chin cup for sleep as a retainer
        by "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
 14) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 722
        by pauloribeiro@convoy.com.br
Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 15:53:50 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000919155350.007b3670@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

30





Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 16:32:01 -0500
From: "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
To: ajodo_toc@mosby.com
Subject: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics September
 2000, Vol. 118, No. 3
Message-ID: <39C29551.20FDFFC@mosby.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Table of Contents for September 2000, Vol. 118, No. 3
http://www.mosby.com/ajodo
--------------------------------------------------------------
Editorial

Good time for discussion of early treatment
David L. Turpin
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a110506

Original Articles

Effects of a mandibular repositioner on obstructive sleep
apnea
Yuehua Liu, DDS, PhD, Xianglong Zeng, DDS, MSc, Minkui Fu, DDS, MSc,
Xizhen Huang, MD, Alan A. Lowe, DMD, PhD, FRCD(C)
Beijing, China, and Vancouver, Canada
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104831

The biomechanics of rapid maxillary sutural expansion
Stanley Braun, DDS, MME, J. Alexandre Bottrel, DDS, Kong-Geun Lee, DDS,
MSD, PhD, José J. Lunazzi, PhD, Harry L. Legan, DDS
Indianapolis, Ind, Rio de Janeiro and Campinas, Brazil, and
Kwangju, South Korea
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108254

A radiographic comparison of apical root resorption after orthodontic
treatment with 3 different fixed appliance techniques
Guilherme R. P. Janson, DDS, MSc, PhD, MRCDC, Graziela de Luca Canto,
DDS, MSc, Décio Rodrigues Martins, DDS, MSc, PhD, José Fernando Castanha
Henriques, DDS, MSc, PhD, Marcos Roberto de Freitas, DDS, MSc, PhD
Sao Paulo, Bauru, Brazil
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a99136

Effect of argon laser irradiation on shear bond strength of
orthodontic brackets: An in vitro study
Travis Q. Talbot, DDS, MS, Richard J. Blankenau, DDS, Mark E. Zobitz,
MS, Amy L. Weaver, MS, Christine M. Lohse, BS, Joe Rebellato, DDS
Rochester, Minn, and Omaha, Neb
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106069

Calibration of force extension and force degradation characteristics
of orthodontic latex elastics
Pakhan Kanchana, DDS, MSc, Keith Godfrey, MDS
Khon Kaen, Thailand
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104493

Effect of altering the type of enamel conditioner on the shear bond
strength of a resin-reinforced glass ionomer adhesive
Samir E. Bishara, BDS, DOrth, DDS, MS, Leigh VonWald, BA, John F.
Laffoon, BS, Jane R. Jakobsen, BS, MA
Iowa City, Iowa
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104903

Effects of two adhesion boosters on the shear bond strength of new and
rebonded orthodontic brackets
Chun-Hsi Chung, DMD, MS, Blair W. Fadem, DDS, Harvey L. Levitt, DDS,
FRCD(C), FICD, FACD, Francis K. Mante, PhD, DMD
Philadelphia, Pa
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104810

Retrospective study of orthodontic bonding without liquid
resin
Alexander T. H. Tang, BDS, FRACDS, PhD, Lars Björkman, DDS, PhD, Lars
Isaksson, DDS, Karl-Fredrik Lindbck, DDS, Anna Andlin-Sobocki, DDS, PhD,
Jan Ekstrand, DDS, PhD
Huddinge, Sweden
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103772

A new multipurpose dental adhesive for orthodontic use: An in vitro
bond-strength study
Doron Harari, DMD, Elias Aunni, Immanuel Gillis, DMD, MSc, Meir Redlich,
DMD, MSc
Jerusalem, Israel
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103779

Effect of changing enamel conditioner concentration on the shear bond
strength of a resin-modified glass ionomer adhesive
Samir E. Bishara, BDS, DOrtho, DDS, MS, Leigh VonWald, BA, John F.
Laffoon, BS, Jane R. Jakobsen, BS, MA
Iowa City, Iowa
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108682

Early treatment of vertical skeletal dysplasia: The hyperdivergent
phenotype
Wayne L. Sankey, DDS, MS, Peter H. Buschang, PhD, Jeryl English, DDS,
MS, Albert H. Owen, III, DDS
Dallas, Tex
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a106068

Effect of unilateral posterior crossbite on the electromyographic
activity of human masticatory muscles
José Antonio Alarcôn, DDS, PhD, Conchita Martín, DDS, PhD, Juan Carlos
Palma, MD, PhD
Madrid, Spain
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a103252

Mandibular growth as related to cervical vertebral maturation and body
height
Lorenzo Franchi, DDS, PhD, Tiziano Baccetti, DDS, PhD, James A.
McNamara, Jr, DDS, PhD
Florence, Italy, and Ann Arbor, Mich
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a107009

American Board of Orthodontics Case Report

Treatment of a Class II Division 1 malocclusion with a high mandibular
angle
Robert A. Vaught, DMD, MSD
Savannah, Ga
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a102175

Case Report

Orthodontic-surgical approach in a case of severe openbite associated
with functional macroglossia
Paulo José Medeiros, DDS, DMD, Elisa Souza Camargo, DDS, Robert Vitral,
DDS, Roberto Rocha, DDS
Rio de Janeiro, Brazil
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a102390

Continuing Education

Questions and registration forms
Zane Muhl, DDS, MS, PhD, Editor
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1180352

Ortho Bytes

Managing digital images
Michael L. Swartz, DDS
Encino, Calif
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a110525

Litigation, Legislation, and Ethics

Perspectives on the dental-legal mindset
Malcolm Meister, DDS, MSM, JD, Richard Masella, DDS, Michael Flynn, JD
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109864

Department of Reviews and Abstracts

An in vitro evaluation of argon laser cured bond strengths of
orthodontic brackets
Marni Voorhees Husson
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183bra

The reliability of manually traced versus computer-generated growth
prediction
Darcie R. Bradley
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183brb

News, Comments, and Service Announcements

News of dentistry and orthodontics
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183ne

Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations

The American Association of Orthodontists, it constituent societies,
the American Board of Orthodontists, the American Association of
Orthodontists Foundation Board of Directors, and the college of
Diplomates of
the American Board of Orthodontics
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183da

Readers' Forum

Revisiting root resorption
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183le

Readers' Services

Editorial board
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183eb

Information for readers
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183ir

Information for authors
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001183ia

_______________________________________________________________________
Copyright (c) 2000 by Mosby, Inc.
INFORMATION FOR READERS:
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Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2000 15:33:59 -0700
From: Zia Chishti <zia@aligntech.com>
To: "'orthod-l@usc.edu'" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: ORTHOD-L digest 722
Message-ID: <BCCA78F2FD3ED41183DA00E0811059BB685A30@2ndexchange.aligntech.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----_=_NextPart_001_01C0202E.355BD3AE"

Dear Fellow ESCO Members,
 
This note is in response to recent postings by Dr. John Schuler and Dr. Vaughn Johnson regarding Invisalign.
 
I am the Chairman and CEO of Align Technology, the manufacturer of the Invisalign System.
 
Dr. Schuler's posting is inflamatory.  Although his posting is in the form of a question, it implies Dr. Schuler's belief that Align Technology will not survive greater than two years and, as a consequence, the orthodontic profession will be left without Align Technology's support.
 
Perhaps Dr. Schuler is not aware of our organization.  Briefly:
 
1.  We employ over 1100 people worldwide, more than the top three orthodontic manufacturers combined.
2.  We have over $150 million in capital with over $10 billion in additional financial resources available to us through our financial partners.
3.  We have trained over 4300 orthodontists in the U.S. on the use of the Invisalign System.
4.  Over 2000 orthodontists are already Align Technology customers.
5.  We are the fastest-growing orthodontic company in history.
6.  The vast majority of patients and orthodontists that have used the Invisalign System are highly enthusiastic about their experience.
 
Dr. Johnson's posting regarding our recent price increase could be interpreted as humorous, but, in the interest of clarity, I would like to state that our price changes were not in response to any balance sheet constraint.  In fact, we have no outstanding material financial debts at all.  Instead, our price changes were consistent with the costs of running our business and the current level of demand we are facing from our customers.
 
At Align we are doing our best to improve the selection of treatments that orthodontists can offer their patients.  We urge our partners in the orthodontic community to support our efforts to help them.  Inflamatory, reactionary or cynical postings do a disservice to the broader orthodontic community and are disheartening to the 1100 employees of Align.  If there are legitimate questions about Align Technology or the Invisalign System, we would be delighted to speak to them directly.
 
Sincerely
 
 
Zia Chishti
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Align Technology, Inc.
Sunnyvale, California
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: orthod-l@usc.edu [mailto:orthod-l@usc.edu]
Sent: Saturday, September 16, 2000 2:34 AM
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 722

ORTHOD-L Digest 722 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Invisalign by John Schuler 3) Re: invsalign by "Vaughn Johnson" 4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition by "jm" 5) 3d occlusogram by Glen Armstrong 6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719 by George Wang 7) Patient to London by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" 8) Re: corso di bio1 by webmaster@siob.it
Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2000 08:37:35 -0300
From: "Jean-Marc Retrouvey" <jean-marc.retrouvey@sympatico.ca>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: invisalign
Message-ID: <004901c01fd2$82f10280$9376d1d8@b1szud31>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
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Has any university done any basic research on how the teeth move with
invisalign, rate of movement, torque control,  type of bone resorption
ect... or do we only get the invisalign clinical point of vue?
Jean Marc
-----Original Message-----
From: orthod-l@usc.edu <orthod-l@usc.edu>
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Date: Saturday, September 16, 2000 6:36 AM
Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 722


>
>     ORTHOD-L Digest 722
>
>Topics covered in this issue include:
>
>  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
> by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
>  2) Invisalign
> by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
>  3) Re: invsalign
> by "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
>  4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
> by "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
>  5) 3d occlusogram
> by Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
>  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
> by George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
>  7) Patient to London
> by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
>  8) Re: corso di bio1
> by webmaster@siob.it
>

Date: Sun, 17 Sep 2000 23:55:10 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "John Schuler" <jlschuler@sprynet.com>,
        "Electronic study club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <045401c02124$3dd14cc0$a9111918@paultower>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0451_01C02102.B6AD5D40"

The people with the original venture capital investment.  Has anyone looked at the stock trendline for Infocure lately?  The corporatization of ortho and related services seems to be a tough row to hoe.
 
Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Orthodontics and Oral and
Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Chapel Hill, NC
----- Original Message -----
From: John Schuler
To: Electronic study club
Sent: Monday, September 11, 2000 7:26 AM
Subject: Invisalign

How about a general comment on Invisalign.  Who thinks it will be with us 2 years from now and who will be left holding the bag?

John Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
Peoria, IL
 
 

anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign?
g. russell frankel
cincinnati
 
 
Date: Mon, 18 Sep 2000 10:44:31 -0500
From: "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
To: "ESCO Listserver \(E-mail\)" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <3B20254E881FD41199C0204C4F4F5020307C@O2>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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re: Invisalign

One good thing that has happened with offices that have signed
on with Invisalign is-       Vinyl Polysiloxane impressions-
We now use VPS for indirect bondings,  Vacuum formed retainers,
and other dimensionally critical appliances.

You can't buy stock in Invisalign, but how about ESPE ???
(and the Deutsche Mark is down this week!)

(no financial interest - yet)

Greg Hoeltzel
Saint Louis 

Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2000 12:39:39 -0700
From: "Williams, Bryan" <bwilli@chmc.org>
To: "'orthod-l@usc.edu'" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
Message-ID: <F70DF0FA4F68D211859E000092967B0902C2DE46@childrens.chmc.org>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"

In ancient history (1989-91) I worked with an engineering graduate student
from the University of Windsor on this interesting area. We found that the
techniques were feasible but that at that time the computer processing power
was inadequate and very slow.  Things have changed in this regard.

He subsequently published his Ph.D. thesis.
John Cardillo  "Unsupervised Machine extraction of Craniofacial Landmarks
for Cephalometric Evaluations"  Faculty of Graduate Studies and Research
(Engineering) University of Windsor ,  Windsor Ontario, Canada.

If you are interested in further information contact me.  This may be of
value for historical perspective.
Bryan Williams
Children's Hospital Seattle

        -----Original Message-----
        From:   jm [SMTP:braces@bigpond.net.au]
        Sent:   Sunday, September 10, 2000 4:46 PM
        To:     orthod-l@usc.edu
        Subject:        Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition

        I am about to embark on a software project involving "Automated
        Cephalometric Landmark recognition".

        <SNIP>




        
Date: Sun, 17 Sep 2000 23:53:19 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
Message-ID: <044901c02123$fbe9cf30$a9111918@paultower>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
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We had a grad student working on that about 8-9 years ago.  Never got it off
the ground.  He's now teaching part-time at UCLA...or at least he was.
David Rudolph is his name.  In terms of achieving accuracy and
reliability...it may be like trying to catch smoke in a net.

Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Orthodontics and Oral and
Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Chapel Hill, NC


----- Original Message -----
From: "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2000 7:46 PM
Subject: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition


> I am about to embark on a software project involving "Automated
> Cephalometric Landmark recognition".
>
> I am curious as to whether there would be a demand for such software.  I
> have been following the research and papers on this subject for about 10
> years and it appears that like voice recognition it may be more trouble
than
> it is worth.  For example with voice recognition the "teaching" curve is
so
> steep that it is still easier to use a Dictaphone and a typist with some
> good word processing/correspondence software linked to a practice/patient
> management package.  Not to mention the plethora of "manual" transcription
> services that are now available on the net.
>
> Given that you can now digitise and analyse a ceph within 5 minutes and
> often a procedure that can be delegated to auxiliaries - would I be right
in
> assuming that Automated Landmark recognition would only be useful in a
> research environ involving large samples?
>
> Is anyone else working on such a project?
>
> Dr John Mamutil
> Orthodontist
> SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
> www.brace5.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Date: Sun, 17 Sep 2000 21:21:49 -0700
From: "Greg Nalchajian" <g.nalchajian.ortho@worldnet.att.net>
To: "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
Message-ID: <003401c02129$6d46b4e0$9875480c@thiscomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

John,
Still seems pretty subjective as to how some landmarks are defined/located.
I expect that any automation may end up causing some grumbling about
definitions and locations. As long as the operator could "adjust" the
outcome by changing the location of various landmarks to suit them, I think
it may fly. I can't speak to the return on investment curve, but I'd imagine
that existing ceph tracing programs may be interested in incorporation this
technology into their programs. Good luck.

Greg Nalchajian, DDS
Fresno, California
----- Original Message -----
From: jm <braces@bigpond.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Sunday, September 10, 2000 4:46 PM
Subject: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition


> I am about to embark on a software project involving "Automated
> Cephalometric Landmark recognition".
>
> I am curious as to whether there would be a demand for such software.  I
> have been following the research and papers on this subject for about 10
> years and it appears that like voice recognition it may be more trouble
than
> it is worth.  For example with voice recognition the "teaching" curve is
so
> steep that it is still easier to use a Dictaphone and a typist with some
> good word processing/correspondence software linked to a practice/patient
> management package.  Not to mention the plethora of "manual" transcription
> services that are now available on the net.
>
> Given that you can now digitise and analyse a ceph within 5 minutes and
> often a procedure that can be delegated to auxiliaries - would I be right
in
> assuming that Automated Landmark recognition would only be useful in a
> research environ involving large samples?
>
> Is anyone else working on such a project?
>
> Dr John Mamutil
> Orthodontist
> SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
> www.brace5.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>

Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 20:09:10 +0800
From: "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Wisdom tooth to replace 7's
Message-ID: <007701c02232$6bfc9b40$69df15a5@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thank you for all the responses over the topic.

Dr. Eric R. Brannon had suggested distallisation of lower 6's to create
spaces and Dr. Paul M. Thomas suggested implants for 7's replacement.

However, would there anymore alternative available when the patient is not
able to afford the prosthesis (implant  and prostho fee) and furthermore,
how successful has anyone distallised lower 6's to create 7-9mm of space for
alignment.

I dont mean to offer orthodontic as charity work as it is really hard work
to make patient's mouth perfect.  But given the situation to present itself
in one of close friends or relatives, it would be tempting to attempt to
"utilise" unerupted teeth for replacement of bad teeth.

It may be difficult to upright the tooth but how much different it would be
than applying tipping type of tooth movement?

I hope anyone can enlighten me further on this matter and I do really
appreciate all the previous alternatives offered.

Sincerely yours;

Tengku


Date: 18 Sep 2000 02:43:51 -0700
From: David Taylor <david_226@altavista.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Cc: armstrong@turbonet.com
Subject: 3d Occlusogram
Message-ID: <20000918094351.6262.cpmta@c012.sfo.cp.net>
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Disposition: inline
Mime-Version: 1.0

We have bought the software a few months ago, after I had seen it at Chicago AAO meeting. We are now quite happy with it. At the beginning we had just a few problems with our flatbed scanner that did not seem to work properly with the software. The tech support from Italy solved our problem.
It is not very difficult to learn how to use the software if  you are familiar with the occlusogram, as described by Marcotte, even if I have to say that the on-line manual is not very well written.
3DO combines the lateral ceph with the occlusal images of the dental arches. The basic concept is that you move the front teeth to the desired position on the X-ray, and then you see on the occlusal view of the dental arches the movements that all the teeth should do to reach their final desired position.
We are now using 3dO to do the treatment planning of our most difficult cases.
There is a paper published on the AJO about this software.

DT


_______________________________________________________________________

Free Unlimited Internet Access! Try it now!
http://www.zdnet.com/downloads/altavista/index.html

_______________________________________________________________________

Date: Sun, 17 Sep 2000 23:54:43 -0700
From: MDLoffice <mdlively@gate.net>
To: Charlie Ruff <orthodmd@aol.com>, Electronic Study Club <orthod-l@usc.edu>,
        Gary Roebuck <BracePla@aol.com>
Subject: Mapping software
Message-ID: <39C5BC33.10769392@gate.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi All:

I was wondering if anyone was familiar with a software program that
could be used to plot the location of patient addresses on a map so that
I could visualize possible clusters.  I am in the process of moving to a
larger office and thought it would be wise to first get a better feel
for exactly how my patient base is distributed before selecting a new
location.

If such a program exists, I am wondering how difficult it would be for
that program to then use my practice management software, IMS, as the
source for the addresses.  If anyone has any knowledge of such a program
or can point me in the right direction it would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance,

Mark

--
Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics
Stuart,  Florida 34994


Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2000 13:49:41 -0300
From: "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
To: <Orthodmd@aol.com>
Cc: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Chin cup for sleep as a retainer
Message-ID: <007a01c01ffe$45bde140$b1fcfea9@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0077_01C01FE4.F7594080"

Charlie
 
Thank you for your information and the example you gave about a transfer patient.
I think that I too would do the same, tell the patient to come later,
What got me , I think is because I didn"t have a really good class III when I received the patient. No family history too.
Anyway, I can tell him how it would be good for him to wear the chin cup now and see what happens.  It would be a good experience.
In such cases, not really a strong class III, the opinions between my friends get divided.  Some think better to let even the suspected cases go to older age, and then treat ,others like to interfere, to make the client not look so bad, in such an important age , and not hold possible maxila growth.  I fit in the second group.
although class III surgery is the one I like most, find it with a great success rate, compared to others, like open bite.  Its a pity that patients here are so difficult to convince.
I have one friend that has an excellent orthognathic rate in her office, but her husband is the surgeon.
 
Priscila
Date: Sat, 16 Sep 2000 11:46:14 -0300
From: pauloribeiro@convoy.com.br
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 722
Message-ID: <200009161446.LAA19290@serv4.convoy.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Cópia orthod-l@usc.edu:

> Dear Sir,

> I'd like to know it there will be a Congresso of
Orthodontic in the USA in this date: from October 22th.
to October 25th. I'm very interested in a Course in
these dates.
Sincerely yours,
Rejane Ribeiro
Curitiba, 09/17/00.                         ORTHOD-L
Digest 722
>
> Topics covered in this issue include:
>
>   1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
>       by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
>   2) Invisalign
>       by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
>   3) Re: invsalign
>       by "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
>   4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
>       by "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
>   5) 3d occlusogram
>       by Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
>   6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
>       by George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
>   7) Patient to London
>       by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ"
<carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
>   8) Re: corso di bio1
>       by webmaster@siob.it
>
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 724

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Invisalign
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  3) Re: invisalign
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  4) Re: invisalign
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 723
        by DrDCarter@aol.com
  6) Re: Invisalign
        by DraKahn@aol.com
  7) special course
        by "Bilal  KOLEILAT" <BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb>
  8) RE: ORTHOD-L digest 723
        by "J Mamutil" <jrg@bigpond.net.au>
  9) 3d occlusograms
        by "DR.UDAY M. WADADEKAR" <druday@vsnl.com>
 10) Re: Mapping software
        by WRed852509@cs.com
 11) orthodontist in Madrid, Spain
        by "yeeny huang" <yeenyh@hotmail.com>
Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2000 13:48:32 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000922134832.008a0100@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

31






Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 22:16:04 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <e0.9ec39c4.26f977e4@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

For those of you who are not subscribers to Compuserve, you may be interested
in the following report (which is a "headline") from the front page of
Compuserve.  I must admit that there are days when I feel like I'm driving a
buckboard.  What do you think?
Look, Ma! Straight Teeth, No Braces
Orthodontia is a rite of passage for many youngsters. Wires and silver and
rubber bands and expanders and a few teasing nicknames are all part of the
deal. That could all change. A Silicon Valley startup called Align Technology
Inc. has created a 3D computing imaging system that straightens teeth without
metal braces. "Orthodontics has been in the horse-and-buggy age for a long
time now. We are this industry's automobile," said Kelsey Wirth, Align's
31-year-old president and daughter of former Colorado Senator Tim Wirth. The
patented system, which has been named "Invisalign," maps out a treatment plan
using 3D computer images. Then the computer software allows Align's
technicians to create a series of clear, removable retainer-like
molds--called "aligners"--that move teeth with few hassles, little pain, and
no obtrusive wires or brackets. In most cases, a patient would wear 20
different removable "aligners" for two- to three-week periods. Orthodontists
have their reservations. "It's not a cure-all. It's going to be more of a
niche product," predicted California orthodontist Dr. Michel Van Bergen.
"There is also potential for abuse here. There could be more dentists that
may try to use (Invisalign) just to make patients look good, but they might
not get the bite quite right." No matter. Align Technology is planning an
initial public offering that could be filed as early as this week. --Cathryn
Conroy

Get additional news reports on a variety of topics from the CompuServe
NewsRoom, GO NEWS. Get health news and information in the Health & Fitness
Channel, GO HEALTH.
 
 
 
Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 22:27:29 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: invisalign
Message-ID: <f9.2e0339c.26f97a91@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Jean,
UOP in San Francisco is studying the exact things you mentioned.  For
additional information you may want to contact Dr. Robert Boyd, Chairman,
Graduate Orthodontics, UOP.   I think his e-mail address is rboyd@uop.edu
Good Luck,
Ron Redmond
Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 09:44:13 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Jean-Marc Retrouvey" <jean-marc.retrouvey@sympatico.ca>,
        <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: invisalign
Message-ID: <012001c02308$ddb103d0$e907173f@paul600x>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I believe it's the latter at the moment.

    -=Paul=-

Paul M. Thomas


----- Original Message -----
From: "Jean-Marc Retrouvey" <jean-marc.retrouvey@sympatico.ca>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Saturday, September 16, 2000 7:37 AM
Subject: invisalign


> Has any university done any basic research on how the teeth move with
> invisalign, rate of movement, torque control,  type of bone resorption
> ect... or do we only get the invisalign clinical point of vue?
> Jean Marc
> -----Original Message-----
> From: orthod-l@usc.edu <orthod-l@usc.edu>
> To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics <orthod-l@usc.edu>
> Date: Saturday, September 16, 2000 6:36 AM
> Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 722
>
>
> >
> >     ORTHOD-L Digest 722
> >
> >Topics covered in this issue include:
> >
> >  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
> > by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
> >  2) Invisalign
> > by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
> >  3) Re: invsalign
> > by "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
> >  4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
> > by "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
> >  5) 3d occlusogram
> > by Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
> >  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
> > by George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
> >  7) Patient to London
> > by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
> >  8) Re: corso di bio1
> > by webmaster@siob.it
> >
>
>

Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 10:13:11 EDT
From: DrDCarter@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 723
Message-ID: <8f.c38d6c.26fa1ff7@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 9/20/00 
 Zia Chishti
 Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
 Align Technology, Inc.
questions the paranoia of orthodontists regarding Invisalign

I'm not paranoid about the technology, in fact I think it is a marvelous
complement to existing methodology and with time and experience will prove to
be more useful than is now recognized.  My clinical experience to date is
positive, but 90% of eligible patients have declined due to cost.  Obviously,
I need coaching on marketing or fee cutting.

Perhaps Zia Chisti would be comfortable explaining why we have listed, in
Portland Oregon, a general dentist, Dr Roger Amiton, as an Align certified
orthodontist?  Look it up for yourselves on the Align website. 

Dick Carter
Portland OR USA
Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 12:04:52 EDT
From: DraKahn@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <28.ae933a4.26fa3a24@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I still really dislike merchants getting into a study club and calling a
doctor's post "Inflamatory."

I think it is "Inflamatory" to have a merchant get in between a conversation
of orthodontists.

Don't you think that if we wanted the opinion of a particular merchant we
would know where to go???

Of course I will not give out my opinion on Invisalign in this forum. But if
anyone wants to approach me directly I would share my opinions.

I feel it is a lose to our study club to allow this to happen and miss out on
real opinions about what happens in the clinic.

Again I exhort our organizers to allow merchants to view, but do not
participate in our discussions.

--------------------------------------------------------------

Dear Fellow ESCO Members,
 
This note is in response to recent postings by Dr. John Schuler and Dr.
Vaughn Johnson regarding Invisalign.
 
I am the Chairman and CEO of Align Technology, the manufacturer of the
Invisalign System.
 
Dr. Schuler's posting is inflamatory.  Although his posting is in the form
of a question, it implies Dr. Schuler's belief that Align Technology will
not survive greater than two years and, as a consequence, the orthodontic
profession will be left without Align Technology's support.
 
Perhaps Dr. Schuler is not aware of our organization.  Briefly:
 
1.  We employ over 1100 people worldwide, more than the top three
orthodontic manufacturers combined.
2.  We have over $150 million in capital with over $10 billion in additional
financial resources available to us through our financial partners.
3.  We have trained over 4300 orthodontists in the U.S. on the use of the
Invisalign System.
4.  Over 2000 orthodontists are already Align Technology customers.
5.  We are the fastest-growing orthodontic company in history.
6.  The vast majority of patients and orthodontists that have used the
Invisalign System are highly enthusiastic about their experience.
 
Dr. Johnson's posting regarding our recent price increase could be
interpreted as humorous, but, in the interest of clarity, I would like to
state that our price changes were not in response to any balance sheet
constraint.  In fact, we have no outstanding material financial debts at
all.  Instead, our price changes were consistent with the costs of running
our business and the current level of demand we are facing from our
customers.
 
At Align we are doing our best to improve the selection of treatments that
orthodontists can offer their patients.  We urge our partners in the
orthodontic community to support our efforts to help them.  Inflamatory,
reactionary or cynical postings do a disservice to the broader orthodontic
community and are disheartening to the 1100 employees of Align.  If there
are legitimate questions about Align Technology or the Invisalign System, we
would be delighted to speak to them directly.
 
Sincerely
 
 
Zia Chishti
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Align Technology, Inc.
Sunnyvale, California
 
 
Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 11:02:49 +0300
From: "Bilal  KOLEILAT" <BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb>
To: "orthodontic study group" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: special course
Message-ID: <200009200813.BAA17908@usc.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Bilal Koleilat
DDS,MSc
Clinical Assistant
Dept. Of Orthodontics
Beirut Arab Universisty
Beirut-Lebanon

Dear Collegues

i am searching for a good and complete coures in lingual orthodontics in
the
U.S.A. Kindly inform me about all the related details.

thanks,
Date: Wed, 20 Sep 2000 22:56:23 +1000
From: "J Mamutil" <jrg@bigpond.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: ORTHOD-L digest 723
Message-ID: <NDBBIPMPELLDOFOOAOEJIEEJCEAA.jrg@bigpond.net.au>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Just curious about the previous posting about the trendline on Infocure -
this prompted me to look up their "chart".  It appears that they own a
number of Practice management systems - ie, they're out there buying out all
the competition.  Is this why there is very little good ortho management
software around - no one seems to be completely satisfied.

        Dr John Mamutil
        Orthodontist
        SYDNEY (the Olympic city)
        INFO: www.brace5.com



Date: Thu, 21 Sep 2000 20:42:41 +0530
From: "DR.UDAY M. WADADEKAR" <druday@vsnl.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: 3d occlusograms
Message-ID: <39CA2568.1F5D248B@vsnl.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------9D39F00F633C68C6BB893F88"

Dear Sir,
             I did my thesis on occlusograms in 1984 for masters degree
(BOMBAY UNIV.) by taking 1:1 x-rays of the orianted models with central
groove,  instead of the 1:1 photographs as suggested by Dr. Burstone ,
Dr. Marrcotte & Dr Larry White , as it shows the apical base as well as
the teeth .You can have guideline as where to position the teeth over
apical base.I compared the norms given by larry white for occlusograms
with my sample size of 30 Class I crowding cases , & did comparritive
study with Bezley's & Nance's method to find out the discrepancy within
the arch & statistcally proved that occlusogram method is superior over
these other methods .It was in 1982-1984 period that time I read one
article for 3D occlusogram with Holography by Japenise orthodontist .
But over all occlusograms are still to make a mark in every
orthodontist's mind.
Can anybody give me the lists of articles published after 1984 in our
ortho journals?

Thanks ,
Dr.Uday M. Wadadekar ( druday@vsnl.com )

orthod-l@usc.edu wrote:

>                             ORTHOD-L Digest 722
>
> Topics covered in this issue include:
>
>   1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
>         by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
>   2) Invisalign
>         by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
>   3) Re: invsalign
>         by "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
>   4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
>         by "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
>   5) 3d occlusogram
>         by Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
>   6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
>         by George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
>   7) Patient to London
>         by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
>   8) Re: corso di bio1
>         by webmaster@siob.it
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
> Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 11:20:44 -0700
> From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
> To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
>
> Dear Colleague:
>
> The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
> exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
> distribution of professional information.
>
> * What information can you get on ESCO?
>
> * How to subscribe to ESCO?
>
> * How to change your address?
>
> * How to post messages on ESCO?
>
> For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
> http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm
>
> Enjoy!
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
> Professor, Department of Orthodontics
> University of Southern California
> http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/
>
>
> 29
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Invisalign
> Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 06:26:44 -0500
> From: John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
> To: Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> How about a general comment on Invisalign.  Who thinks it will be with
> us 2 years from now and who will be left holding the bag?
>
> John Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
> Peoria, IL
>
>
>
> anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign?
> g. russell frankel
> cincinnati
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: invsalign
> Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 09:31:56 -0600
> From: "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> ouch....but predictable when the $8 million line of credit comes due.
> vaughn johnson
> durango, co
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "g russell frankel" <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
> Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2000 8:36 PM
> Subject: invsalign
>
>
> > anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign?
> > g. russell frankel
> > cincinnati
> >
> >
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
> Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 09:46:08 +1000
> From: "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
>
> I am about to embark on a software project involving "Automated
> Cephalometric Landmark recognition".
>
> I am curious as to whether there would be a demand for such software.  I
> have been following the research and papers on this subject for about 10
> years and it appears that like voice recognition it may be more trouble than
> it is worth.  For example with voice recognition the "teaching" curve is so
> steep that it is still easier to use a Dictaphone and a typist with some
> good word processing/correspondence software linked to a practice/patient
> management package.  Not to mention the plethora of "manual" transcription
> services that are now available on the net.
>
> Given that you can now digitise and analyse a ceph within 5 minutes and
> often a procedure that can be delegated to auxiliaries - would I be right in
> assuming that Automated Landmark recognition would only be useful in a
> research environ involving large samples?
>
> Is anyone else working on such a project?
>
> Dr John Mamutil
> Orthodontist
> SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
> www.brace5.com
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: 3d occlusogram
> Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 18:10:38 -0700
> From: Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
> To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
>
> Does anyone have any experience with Medi-dent's 3D occlusogram program?
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
> Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 12:23:09 +0800
> From: George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
> To: orthod-l@usc.edu
>
> Dear Group,
>
> I have heard of this HYCON Device. Dose anyone has experience in using
> it to close space? Where can I purchase it?
>
> George Wang
> Hong Kong
>
>
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Patient to London
> Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2000 08:02:25 -0500
> From: "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
> To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>I am an orthodontist from Manizales,Colombia.
> One of my patients is leaving to London and I would like to know if
> there is any of you who could teke her as a patient and finish her
> treatment (Straight Wire Technique)I'll apprecaite your help.Carlos E.
> Gomez
>    ----------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Subject: Re: corso di bio1
> Date: Thu, 14 Sep 2000 08:37:32 +0200
> From: webmaster@siob.it
> To: <webmaster@siob.it>
>
>
>
>
>
>       L’USO DEL PENDOLO DI HILGERS NEL CONTESTO DELLA MECCANICA
>                             BIOPROGRESSIVA
>       nuova pubblicazione del dottor Daniele Razzani
>      all'indirizzohttp://digilander.iol.it/lunasido/siob/fb/pub20/default.htm
>
>
>
>
>
>           Ugo De Marinis (webmaster sito siob)
>                     webmaster@siob.it
>           http://www.siob.it
>      home page http://www.mclink.it/personal/MC2445
>       mail personale udmbg@mclink.it
>      home page english version
>         http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Spa/1751
>      international mail ugodemarinis@tiscalinet.com
>
Dear Sir,
             I did my thesis on occlusograms in 1984 for masters degree (BOMBAY UNIV.) by taking 1:1 x-rays of the orianted models with central groove,  instead of the 1:1 photographs as suggested by Dr. Burstone , Dr. Marrcotte & Dr Larry White , as it shows the apical base as well as the teeth .You can have guideline as where to position the teeth over apical base.I compared the norms given by larry white for occlusograms with my sample size of 30 Class I crowding cases , & did comparritive study with Bezley's & Nance's method to find out the discrepancy within the arch & statistcally proved that occlusogram method is superior over these other methods .It was in 1982-1984 period that time I read one article for 3D occlusogram with Holography by Japenise orthodontist . But over all occlusograms are still to make a mark in every orthodontist's mind.
Can anybody give me the lists of articles published after 1984 in our ortho journals?

Thanks ,
Dr.Uday M. Wadadekar ( druday@vsnl.com )

orthod-l@usc.edu wrote:

                           
ORTHOD-L Digest 722

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik
<orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Invisalign
        by John Schuler
<jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  3) Re: invsalign
        by "Vaughn Johnson"
<vjohnson@frontier.net>
  4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
        by "jm"
<braces@bigpond.net.au>
  5) 3d occlusogram
        by Glen Armstrong
<armstrong@turbonet.com>
  6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
        by George Wang
<georgesw@netvigator.com>
  7) Patient to London
        by "CARLOS ENRIQUE
GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
  8) Re: corso di bio1
        by
webmaster@siob.it

Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 11:20:44 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information.  

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: 
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. 
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/


29







Subject: Invisalign
Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 06:26:44 -0500
From: John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
To: Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>

How about a general comment on Invisalign.  Who thinks it will be with us 2 years from now and who will be left holding the bag?

John Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
Peoria, IL
 
 

anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign?
g. russell frankel
cincinnati


Subject: Re: invsalign
Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 09:31:56 -0600
From: "Vaughn Johnson" <vjohnson@frontier.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
ouch....but predictable when the $8 million line of credit comes due.
vaughn johnson
durango, co
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "g russell frankel" <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2000 8:36 PM
Subject: invsalign


> anybody care to comment on the new price list from invisalign?
> g. russell frankel
> cincinnati
> 
> 


Subject: Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition
Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 09:46:08 +1000
From: "jm" <braces@bigpond.net.au>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
I am about to embark on a software project involving "Automated
Cephalometric Landmark recognition".

I am curious as to whether there would be a demand for such software.  I
have been following the research and papers on this subject for about 10
years and it appears that like voice recognition it may be more trouble than
it is worth.  For example with voice recognition the "teaching" curve is so
steep that it is still easier to use a Dictaphone and a typist with some
good word processing/correspondence software linked to a practice/patient
management package.  Not to mention the plethora of "manual" transcription
services that are now available on the net.

Given that you can now digitise and analyse a ceph within 5 minutes and
often a procedure that can be delegated to auxiliaries - would I be right in
assuming that Automated Landmark recognition would only be useful in a
research environ involving large samples?

Is anyone else working on such a project?

Dr John Mamutil
Orthodontist
SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA
www.brace5.com







Subject: 3d occlusogram
Date: Mon, 11 Sep 2000 18:10:38 -0700
From: Glen Armstrong <armstrong@turbonet.com>
To: ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU
Does anyone have any experience with Medi-dent's 3D occlusogram program?

Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719
Date: Fri, 15 Sep 2000 12:23:09 +0800
From: George Wang <georgesw@netvigator.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Dear Group,

I have heard of this HYCON Device. Dose anyone has experience in using
it to close space? Where can I purchase it?

George Wang
Hong Kong


Subject: Patient to London
Date: Tue, 12 Sep 2000 08:02:25 -0500
From: "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" <carrique@emtelsa.multi.net.co>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>I am an orthodontist from Manizales,Colombia. One of my patients is leaving to London and I would like to know if there is any of you who could teke her as a patient and finish her treatment (Straight Wire Technique)I'll apprecaite your help.Carlos E. Gomez

Subject: Re: corso di bio1
Date: Thu, 14 Sep 2000 08:37:32 +0200
From: webmaster@siob.it
To: <webmaster@siob.it>

 


137988e5.jpg 
L’USO DEL PENDOLO DI HILGERS NEL CONTESTO DELLA MECCANICA BIOPROGRESSIVA
 nuova pubblicazione del dottor Daniele Razzani all'indirizzohttp://digilander.iol.it/lunasido/siob/fb/pub20/default.htm
 
 
 

     Ugo De Marinis (webmaster sito siob)
               webmaster@siob.it
     http://www.siob.it
home page http://www.mclink.it/personal/MC2445
 mail personale udmbg@mclink.it
home page english version
   http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/Spa/1751
international mail ugodemarinis@tiscalinet.com
Date: Tue, 19 Sep 2000 22:19:24 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Mapping software
Message-ID: <41.10c466c.26f978ac@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Mark,
I'm positive that Microsoft has produced just what you want, but the name of
it has escaped me.  If I find it, I will e-mail you.
Ron Redmond
Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2000 08:56:34 GMT
From: "yeeny huang" <yeenyh@hotmail.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: orthodontist in Madrid, Spain
Message-ID: <F119voGdKO8FNpyLAPD00000866@hotmail.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed

Dear fellow orthodontists,
I have a patient who will be in Madrid for 6 months. Anyone out there who
can recommend a fellow colleague in Madrid whom my patient can visit during
his stay there? Thanks.
Dr. Yeeny Huang,
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia



_________________________________________________________________________
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Embedded Content: 137988e5.jpg: 00000001,43711edd,00000000,00000000 Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\biglogo4.jpg"
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 725

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Invisalign
        by YURFEST@aol.com
  3) Re: [ORTHOD-L digest 724]
        by teena bedi <teenabedi@usa.net>
  4) Invialign - Response to Zia Christi
        by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  5) Invisalign-infammatory response
        by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  6) Invisalign
        by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  7) Invisalign - cost
        by John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  8) Orthodontic Meeting in Thailand in November
        by "Morris and Pauline Rapaport" <mrapapor@mail.usyd.edu.au>
  9) Re: Mapping software
        by MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
 10) Incisor apices
        by "kabir" <kabir@comsats.net.pk>
 11) Re: Orthodontist in Madrid
        by DraKahn@aol.com
 12) Re: Mapping software
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 13) Finns vs Mongolian study
        by "Stephen Chu" <schu888@attglobal.net>
 14) Who should be allowed to participate in ESCO
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
 15) ESCO - posting messages from non-orthodontists
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2000 13:43:05 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000929134305.007b7d60@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

32





Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2000 20:55:04 EDT
From: YURFEST@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <98.a78da85.26fd5968@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In a message dated 9/22/00 5:10:27 PM Eastern Daylight Time, DraKahn@aol.com
writes:

<<
 I still really dislike merchants getting into a study club and calling a
 doctor's post "Inflammatory."
 
 I think it is "Inflammatory" to have a merchant get in between a
conversation
 of orthodontists.
 
 Don't you think that if we wanted the opinion of a particular merchant we
 would know where to go???
 
 Of course I will not give out my opinion on Invisalign in this forum. But if
 anyone wants to approach me directly I would share my opinions.
 
 I feel it is a lose to our study club to allow this to happen and miss out
on
 real opinions about what happens in the clinic.
 
 Again I exhort our organizers to allow merchants to view, but do not
 participate in our discussions.
 
 --------------------------------------------------------------
 
 Dear Fellow ESCO Members,
 
 This note is in response to recent postings by Dr. John Schuler and Dr.
 Vaughn Johnson regarding Invisalign.
 
 I am the Chairman and CEO of Align Technology, the manufacturer of the
 Invisalign System.
 
 Dr. Schuler's posting is inflamatory.  Although his posting is in the form
 of a question, it implies Dr. Schuler's belief that Align Technology will
 not survive greater than two years and, as a consequence, the orthodontic
 profession will be left without Align Technology's support.
 
 Dr. Johnson's posting regarding our recent price increase could be
 interpreted as humorous, but, in the interest of clarity, I would like to
 state that our price changes were not in response to any balance sheet
 constraint.  In fact, we have no outstanding material financial debts at
 all.  Instead, our price changes were consistent with the costs of running
 our business and the current level of demand we are facing from our
 customers.
  (edited for brevity)
 At Align we are doing our best to improve the selection of treatments that
 orthodontists can offer their patients.  We urge our partners in the
 orthodontic community to support our efforts to help them.  Inflamatory,
 reactionary or cynical postings do a disservice to the broader orthodontic
 community and are disheartening to the 1100 employees of Align.  If there
 are legitimate questions about Align Technology or the Invisalign System, we
 would be delighted to speak to them directly.
 
 Sincerely
 
 
 Zia Chishti
 Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
 Align Technology, Inc.
 Sunnyvale, California
   >>
I use Invisalign where appropriate, and feel there is a limited place for
this technology, which is severely limited by the fact there is no way  the
occlusion can be fitted or aligned using interarch  elastics. We do not know
how many "treatments" will need to be retreated using conventional braces to
correct the occlusion.
      This forum is now "chilled" by the fact that doctors can't freely
express their "professional" opinion on the efficacy of a medical device
without their opinion being attacked on nonmedical grounds by the
manufacturer. Rather than attacking the opinion, the manufacturer needs to
address the concerns and comments of their customers (orthodontists)
Paul Yurfest, DDS ABO,etc
Date: 23 Sep 00 11:40:31 MDT
From: teena bedi <teenabedi@usa.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: [ORTHOD-L digest 724]
Message-ID: <20000923174031.3472.qmail@nwcst312.netaddress.usa.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

 Dear Collegues we all seem to be arguing about Invisalign but not all of us
have been able to see it . We have only read about it! Its difficult to
comment about it without seeing it. I am practising in delhi.INDIA. Which net
sites will offer some images and more info about it? Thanks.orthod-l@usc.edu
wrote:

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 724

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Invisalign
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  3) Re: invisalign
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  4) Re: invisalign
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 723
        by DrDCarter@aol.com
  6) Re: Invisalign
        by DraKahn@aol.com
  7) special course
        by "Bilal  KOLEILAT" <BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb>
  8) RE: ORTHOD-L digest 723
        by "J Mamutil" <jrg@bigpond.net.au>
  9) 3d occlusograms
        by "DR.UDAY M. WADADEKAR" <druday@vsnl.com>
 10) Re: Mapping software
        by WRed852509@cs.com
 11) orthodontist in Madrid, Spain
        by "yeeny huang" <yeenyh@hotmail.com>

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____________________________________________________________________
Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1
Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2000 11:52:18 -0500
From: John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
To: Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invialign - Response to Zia Christi
Message-ID: <39D0D43F.A186AAF5@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative; boundary="------------85E8D1ECC417CF9AD17D9226"

Zia Christi,

I do not think that this form is a place for the CEO of an orthodontic company to personally attack an orthodontist.  Why bite the hand that feeds you unless you intend not to be fed by that hand in the future?

<<Dr. Schuler's posting is inflamatory.  Although his posting is in the form
of a question, it implies Dr. Schuler's belief that Align Technology will
not survive greater than two years>>

What Gives Zia Christi the right to tell you, my colleagues, what I am implying?

<<Perhaps Dr. Schuler is not aware of our organization.  Briefly:

1.  We employ over 1100 people worldwide, more than the top three
orthodontic manufacturers combined.
2.  We have over $150 million in capital with over $10 billion in additional
financial resources available to us through our financial partners.
3.  We have trained over 4300 orthodontists in the U.S. on the use of the
Invisalign System.
4.  Over 2000 orthodontists are already Align Technology customers.
5.  We are the fastest-growing orthodontic company in history.
6.  The vast majority of patients and orthodontists that have used the
Invisalign System are highly enthusiastic about their experience.>>

And then he implies I am ignorant.  All of the above does not matter if it does not work in a predictable fashion on a consistent basis.  The only published report I have read has been a promotional article by a financially interested author in the Journal of Comical Orthodontics.

<<Instead, our price changes were consistent with the costs of running
our business and the current level of demand we are facing from our
customers.>>

Make the cash while you can!

<<Inflamatory, reactionary or cynical postings do a disservice to the broader orthodontic
community and are disheartening to the 1100 employees of Align.>>

I'm sorry to have hurt your feelings.  Do you care about mine?

John L. Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
Peoria, IL
Invisalign trained, PVS ready and still waiting for a patient to call
 
Date: Wed, 27 Sep 2000 06:40:01 -0500
From: John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
To: Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign-infammatory response
Message-ID: <39D1DC90.28386F50@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear members,

I could not resist another post regarding Zia Chishti's (CEO Invisalign)
posting, regarding my question about the long term viability of
Invisalign.  As you may have read, Chishti thinks that to question the
long term success of a new business is inflammatory.

Could you imagine the CEO of Disney publicly deriding someone at
Disneyland questioning the long term success of Euro Disney?  How about
Jeff Bezos personally writing an abusive response to a buyer of his
books for asking the same question about Amazon.com?

As I told my Invisalign rep, I think the product has great potential
with very careful case selection.  However, many great products have
failed due to poor management/customer service/marketing - Betamax, Mac
OS, Iridium.  All of the money in the world will not help a company who
does not realize who their customer base is and how to treat them.

I would never imagine the CEO of Ormco publicly chastising me and expect
me to continue to buy their product.

Alas, we have but one Invisalign, at least until the patent runs out or
we find a way around it.

John L. Schuler DDS, MS
Peoria, IL

P.S. if Chishti if talking about the inflammatory response his appliance
causes in the periodontal membrane, sorry for the misinterpretation of
his response.

Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2000 14:08:14 -0500
From: John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
To: Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <39D0F41C.767F73E3@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear members,

What does everyone think of the new Invisalign commercials?  Do you
think they present fixed appliances in a positive image or in direct
competition to traditional appliances?  Do you think they are destroying
what we have worked for years to create?  Do you think the AAO
convention is a suitable place for their product to be displayed? I
assume attendance at our convention is by invitation of the membership.

Just a thought or two.

John L. Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
Peoria, IL

Date: Wed, 27 Sep 2000 06:50:44 -0500
From: John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
To: Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign - cost
Message-ID: <39D1DF14.E847035F@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear members,

Is anyone having any difficulty presenting the treatment fee for
Invisalign?  Our consultant told us we should charge 3 to 4 times the
lab cost.

John L. Schuler DDS, MS
Peoria, IL

Date: Tue, 26 Sep 2000 01:11:55 +1000
From: "Morris and Pauline Rapaport" <mrapapor@mail.usyd.edu.au>
To: "ORTHO list ESCO" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: Orthodontic Meeting in Thailand in November
Message-ID: <003001c02703$88749220$0b11000a@ucc.su.OZ.AU>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_002D_01C02756.C2F23DA0"

Dear Colleagues,
 
INVITATION
 
The Australian Begg Orthodontic Society (ABOS) in Conjunction with Khon Kaen University (KKU) in north east Thailand are holding the annual ABOS meeting at the Sofitel Hotel and on the University campus in Khon Kaen in early November 2000. All orthodontists and their partners are invited to attend. As well as an exciting scientific program, there will be organised sight-seeing tours of the countryside and the famous silk producing region.
 
All orthodontists, regardless of the technique they use are welcome and you will be pleasantly surprised to see how diversified and relevant the program is. For instance, Professor John Gibbons from the Department of Pathology at the University of Sydney and former visiting Professor at U. of Colorado and Harvard, is giving two lectures on Recent Molecular Biological insights in Facio-Maxillary Development. Professor Sarinnaphakom from the Prosthetic Department of KKU will be giving one of the two lectures on occlusion; "Occlusal principles for orthodontic therapy"; another lecture is entitled "Bite Force and its Meaning". The full scientific program is on our web site.
 
The registration fees have been deliberately kept incredibly low and even postgraduate students will find they can afford to attend. This is despite the conference being held in a five star luxurious hotel. It is better still if you are exchanging American dollars or Euros. We have been assisted by the generosity of the 3M Unitek Company who helped print and distribute the registration booklets. Khon Kaen is not on the usual tourist trail so you can experience the untouched culture of this Isaan Region and visit temples, bronze and iron age pre-historic archaeological sites.
 
There are regular flights from Bangkok to Khon Kaen and these take about one hour. The full social and scientific program runs from Monday 6th to Friday 10th November 2000.  There is a pre conference Tip Edge Course (min 20)
 
Registration forms can be printed off the web site. www.myorthodontist.net/begg
Our appointed travel agent for flights and accommodation information is Ms Vicky Gilden of Jetset Tours E-Mail sales@jetsetrosebay.com.au
Further information can also be obtained by contacting the President ABOS Dr Morris Rapaport
E-Mail braces@orthodontist.net
 
 
 
 
Date: Fri, 22 Sep 2000 20:49:09 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Mapping software
Message-ID: <39CBFE05.242AF31A@adelphia.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thanks Ron - I will do a search tonight.

Mark

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Mon, 25 Sep 2000 23:38:42 +0500
From: "kabir" <kabir@comsats.net.pk>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Incisor apices
Message-ID: <002d01c02728$f6935640$7d0a38d2@kabir>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0073_01C02749.BD516D60"

Hi straight-wire fellows
I have a patient undergoing his third stage (space closure) the patient suddenly noticed that the apices of both of  his lateral incisors and canines has become quite visible and I could feel the apices with my finger. The patient was on rectangular wire. I immediately removed the elastomeric chain and added the torque in the rectangular wire to throw back the apices  first. I would love to hear the comments of my senior friends in this regard.
Ahmed Kabir
Islamabad
Pakistan
----- Original Message -----
From: orthod-l@usc.edu
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Sent: Saturday, September 23, 2000 2:34 PM
Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 724



    ORTHOD-L Digest 724

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: Invisalign
by WRed852509@cs.com
  3) Re: invisalign
by WRed852509@cs.com
  4) Re: invisalign
by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  5) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 723
by DrDCarter@aol.com
  6) Re: Invisalign
by DraKahn@aol.com
  7) special course
by "Bilal  KOLEILAT" <BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb>
  8) RE: ORTHOD-L digest 723
by "J Mamutil" <jrg@bigpond.net.au>
  9) 3d occlusograms
by "DR.UDAY M. WADADEKAR" <druday@vsnl.com>
 10) Re: Mapping software
by WRed852509@cs.com
 11) orthodontist in Madrid, Spain
by "yeeny huang" <yeenyh@hotmail.com>

Date: Mon, 25 Sep 2000 11:57:33 EDT
From: DraKahn@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Orthodontist in Madrid
Message-ID: <3e.14f56de.2700cfed@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

An exellent orthodontist in Madrid is Dr. Jaime Varela. Here is his Email
address. Let me know if you need more information.

varela@sei.es

--------------------------------------------------

Dear fellow orthodontists,
I have a patient who will be in Madrid for 6 months. Anyone out there who
can recommend a fellow colleague in Madrid whom my patient can visit during
his stay there? Thanks.
Dr. Yeeny Huang,
    Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia
Date: Sat, 23 Sep 2000 12:53:40 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: <WRed852509@cs.com>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Mapping software
Message-ID: <00a501c0257e$d40fdbd0$1c07173f@paul600x>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

They have two products.  Streets and Triplanner, I think.  But they are
manually operated programs so someone would have to input all the stuff
manually.  Not going to interface with your management database.

Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Departments of Orthodontics and
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Manning Drive
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514

----- Original Message -----
From: <WRed852509@cs.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Tuesday, September 19, 2000 10:19 PM
Subject: Re: Mapping software


> Hi Mark,
> I'm positive that Microsoft has produced just what you want, but the name
of
> it has escaped me.  If I find it, I will e-mail you.
> Ron Redmond
>

Date: Sat, 23 Sep 2000 18:20:23 -0500
From: "Stephen Chu" <schu888@attglobal.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Finns vs Mongolian study
Message-ID: <002801c025b4$d97469c0$0101a8c0@ont.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello:

I am looking  for an Orthodontics Chair Person  or department  in Finland
who might be interested in  doing a c/1 normal young adults  cephalometrics
study between the Finns and the Mongolian.  At this time I have the
Mongolian data .


Thank in advance


Stephen Chu  DDS MSD
-----------------------------------------------------
Click here for Free Video!!
http://www.gohip.com/free_video/

----- Original Message -----
From: "Joseph Zernik" <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: <ORTHOD-L@usc.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, September 06, 2000 7:49 PM
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics


>
>
>
> Dear Colleague:
>
> The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
> exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
> distribution of professional information.
>
> * What information can you get on ESCO?
>
> * How to subscribe to ESCO?
>
> * How to change your address?
>
> * How to post messages on ESCO?
>
> For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
> http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm
>
> Enjoy!
>
> Sincerely,
>
> Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
> Professor, Department of Orthodontics
> University of Southern California
> http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/
>
> 27
>
>
>
>
>

Date: Sat, 23 Sep 2000 15:30:15 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Who should be allowed to participate in ESCO
Message-ID: <6e.3450742.26fe5ec7@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Dr. Kahn,

The below copied material is from DR. Z's Web page.  In it he states that the
purpose of the ESCO is " a free service, operated on the Internet by Dr.
Joseph Zernik from the University of Southern California. It is intended for
free exchange of information and opinions by members of our profession."

Quite frankly I'm not really sure what he means by "members of our
profession."  Is that an expansive term meaning everyone involved with
orthodontics should have a voice?  Or is Dr. Z a strict constructionist and
feels only those who are board eligible should have a voice?

As I read the rest of his Web page, I noticed that he was kind enough to
include a posting by the luminary from Portland, OR, Dr. Carter.  You'll
notice that Dr. Carter has taken an expansionist viewpoint and feels this
forum is for those who are an "orthodontist, pediatric dentist, a lay person
involved with dental products, dental practice management, etc.?" 

He goes on to say that this forum should be expansive in nature because "this
helps all of us understand your position."

One has to assume that Dr Z shares this opinion since he has included this
material on his Web page.  One might think of this material as a charter of
the ESCO.

If that is so, can we put it to rest as far as who participates?  I for one
think the more the merrier. Of course, I do have my doubts about pediatric
dentists, but being younger and less wise than Dick Carter, I will acceed to
his wisdom in this matter.

Those are my two cents for what it is worth!!!

Charlie Ruff

ELECTRONIC STUDY CLUB for ORTHODONTICS (ESCO)




The ELECTRONIC STUDY CLUB is a free service, operated on the Internet by Dr.
Joseph Zernik from the University of Southern California. It is intended for
free exchange of information and opinions by members of our profession.

What can you find in the Electronic Study Club?
Discussions on ESCO have covered a wide range of subjects including specific
appliances and their performance in practice, unusual cases, issues related
to practice management, and announcements of upcoming meetings.

The American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics, as well as
the Journal of Clinical Orthodontics and the Angle Orthodontist transmit
their tables of contents with some additional notes to ESCO, usually a month
or more before they appear in print. The Journal of Clinical Orthodontics
also transmits its editorials.

You can also visit some of the orthodontic journals directly at their web
pages:

The American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopaedics

Or, you can visit our Orthodontic web seminars:

Orthodontics in Theory and Practice - Web Seminars

To subscribe to ESCO by email
Send a message through your email system to the following address
LISTPROC@USC.EDU
The body of the message should include only the following:
SUBSCRIBE ORTHOD-L <firstname> <last name>.
For example:
SUBSCRIBE ORTHOD-L John Smith would subscribe the person with that name to
the Electronic Study Club.

To send an email message to the ESCO
Send your message to the following address:
ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU


When posting your message to ESCO...
Suggestions by Dr. D. Carter

Dear Group

We are all groping our way in an exciting new medium. We are all
professionals and lifelong students. Let's adopt a protocol so all will know
who is posting comments. My suggestion, open to all comments and responses,
is:
1. In the SUBJECT section at the top of most E mail programs; Instead of
using the default subject, i.e. root paralleling for implants, insert a
succinct keyword or keywords of YOUR message. My example is the subject of
this message as written at the top of the window you are currently viewing
2. After a brief synopsis of the message you are responding to, state your
message. Please do not copy the entire previous message. We can all find it
in our "old mail" on our discs. If you cannot do this, read the instructions
on your E-mail program. Most have a history section.
3. Sign your actual name, not your anonymous screen name.
4. Your city and country, please. Anyone who can access the internet and
correspond in English should be proud of where they come from - even
Californians.
5. Your professional interest in the debate at hand. Are you an orthodontist,
pediatric dentist, a lay person involved with dental products, dental
practice management, etc.? This helps all of us understand your position. It
also allows AAO members to access a database which tells us who you are.
6. Please don't repeat your E mail address - it is automatically included in
everyone's E mail postings.
Thank you for your support. I love this game! I especially enjoy the
international comments and do not expect perfect English. Especially from
young Americans. Just do it! Ciao. Domo arrigato.
Dick Carter Portland OR USA

Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2000 15:13:39 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - posting messages from non-orthodontists
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20000929151339.007b2b10@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

September 29, 2000

Dear Colleagues:

Charlie Ruff has raised questions regarding the posting of messages from
non-orthodontists on ESCO.  In general - our policy is as stated - to limit
this forum to discussion among members of our professional community. In
accordance with this policy, we block numerous messages that come from
patients requesting online consultation, or from advertisers, etc.
However, when an individual, a corporation, or a product is discussed, and
the relevant parties feel that they have not been fairly represented in the
discussion, at times we allowed them to respond.

We are glad to be of service to the orthodontic community, and we are
grateful to all of you who post material on ESCO.  These contributions are
what keeps this forum interesting and informative.  In particular, we are
interested in clinical material, including clinical photographs or
radiographs.  Such images ideally should be displayed on your web page, and
the URL included in the email message.

Cheers,

Joe Zernik

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 726

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Arab Orthodontic Congress
        by "MAZEN SALLOUM" <drmsalloum@hotmail.com>
  3) Re: Mapping software
        by MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
  4) Invisalign
        by "David M. Lebsack" <dml-4266@ccp.com>
  5) invisalign
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
  6) Invisilign
        by rperrec@attglobal.net
  7) Invisalign: Actual experience
        by Drted35@aol.com
  8) Align Technology Response To Posts in Digest 725
        by Zia Chishti <zia@aligntech.com>
  9) invisalign
        by g russell frankel <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
 10) RE: ORTHOD-L digest 725
        by "Office" <office@nordstromd.com>
 11) Invisalgn results
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
 12) Invisalign
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
 13) Invisalign price increase
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
 14) Fw: Invisalign
        by "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
Date: Wed, 04 Oct 2000 00:15:24 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001004001524.007d04b0@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

33





Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 17:19:08 EET
From: "MAZEN SALLOUM" <drmsalloum@hotmail.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Arab Orthodontic Congress
Message-ID: <F242yPoHZgzDgtZKpjE000084ca@hotmail.com>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; format=flowed



  Dear Colleague

I would  like to ask you ,if possible, to publicate this event in your WEB,
and also the announcement that Lebanon will host the :

                       5th Arab Orthodontic Congress
                       5th Lebanese Orthodontic Congress

          To be held on October 11 - 12 - 13 , 2001 Beirut - Lebanon
                                Organized by
                       The Lebanese Orthodontic Society


For further information , please contact :

Prf. Pierre Riscallah -President of the congress :
Tel-Fax: 961 1 322618 , Email : peterrkh@cyberia.net.lb
P.O.Box : 16-5463 Beirut.
Dr Mazen SALLOUM- President LOS :
Tel-Fax : 961 1 345371, Email : drmsalloum@hotmail.com , P.O.Box : 113-6390
Beirut.
Dr.Chafik TABBARA - V.P. LOS :
Tel-Fax : 961 1 647436 , Email :drtabbara@lynx.net.lb ,
P.O.Box : 155420 Beirut

   Thank you very much for your cooperation.

                                         Sincerely

                                                                            
                         Dr. Mazen SALLOUM . president
                              Lebanese Orthodontic Society



_________________________________________________________________________
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http://profiles.msn.com.

Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 16:04:52 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Mapping software
Message-ID: <39D64764.432E3FD6@adelphia.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thanks for the info.  I ordered a product from Microsoft called
MapPoint.  It is supposed to digest data from one program and will map
by address.  I called my practice management provider, IMS, and was
advised that this would not be a problem.  They will take my data, save
it to another file to avoid corruption and MapPoint will extract data
from this file to plot patient addresses.  Sounds pretty easy but I will
know for sure once I have attempted the task.

Mark

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 05:22:37 -0500
From: "David M. Lebsack" <dml-4266@ccp.com>
To: Orthodontic Study <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <39D5BECD.C1EF4684@ccp.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Orthodontic Study ;

    I have been watching the developments of invisalign in the last view
months. And I have these observations.

1.) I feel that it has some potential in the treatment of selected
cases. Which cases one should select is the big question at this point
in time. I feel it has at best a "niche" potential in treating
orthodontic cases.

2.)  I feel that there seems to be an aggressive attitude on the part of
Invisalign in promoting their product. I saw a commercial the other
night on TV that presented a somewhat negative image of traditional
fixed appliances. I feel that venture capitalists should learn to
respect the profession that they are allegedly hoping to help.

3.) Venture capitalists are essentially people who fund projects that
they hope will be financial successes.  Therefore, I am concerned that
some venture capitalists will not use "good" judgment when they promote
their products. I read an article in USA Today that portrayed
orthodontics as being in the
"horse and buggy" mode. I do not feel that I am in the horse and buggy
mode.

4.) In the present climate of the health care arena, I feel that the
doctor is the only person who will protect the  patients interests. I am
not sure if Venture Capitalists have the same commitment to the patient
that the doctor has. Especially after reading some on the posts on the
Electronic Orthodontic Study Club.

I show no ill will towards anyone here. I mean everything in the nicest
way  possible. But I suspect that there is the potential for  divergent
motivations when new technologies are promoted by Venture Capitalists.

David M. Lebsack DDS MS

Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 06:43:47 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Cc: jillalign@mindspring.com (Jill Cadigan)
Subject: invisalign
Message-ID: <6b.a55bcb3.27071de3@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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Dear Zia Chisti,

The nature of orthodontics has been and will continue to be based on long
term relationships.  The  entire industry is essentially an informal
fraternal organization. This includes clinicians, staff, lab people, and
retailers.  The essence of our professional relationships with patients is
long term.  Naturally, there are exceptions but, in the main, most of us like
it this way.

I assume this is one of the reasons you hired a force of sales reps that had
previous ortho experience.  They knew the clinicians and already had
relationships extablished.

Having said that, I am not privy to your business plan and whether these
traditional relationships are important to you.  One of the criticisms of
American business is that the only thing that matters is the botton line for
this quarter.  Perhaps a more long term focus would be in everyone's best
interest unless of course your business plan calls for your relationship with
us to be nothing more than a megabeta test before taking your technology
elsewhere.

Charlie Ruff
Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 10:27:33 -0400
From: rperrec@attglobal.net
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisilign
Message-ID: <39D5F855.2BCEA27E@attglobal.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
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Subject:
        Invisalign
   Date:
        Tue, 26 Sep 2000 14:08:14 -0500
   From:
        John Schuler <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
     To:
        Electronic study club <orthod-l@usc.edu>



Dear members,

What does everyone think of the new Invisalign commercials?  Do you
think they present fixed appliances in a positive image or in direct
competition to traditional appliances?  Do you think they are destroying

what we have worked for years to create?  Do you think the AAO
convention is a suitable place for their product to be displayed? I
assume attendance at our convention is by invitation of the membership.

Just a thought or two.

John L. Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
Peoria, IL

I live in upstate New York and the adds started appearing last week, I
have been questioned about Invisalign by several patients. I tell my
patients the following when asked about the Invisalign system

    1) The technique is limited as to the type of case that can be
treated
    2) Since it is new I have no way of knowing what the long term
stability of the cases treated with Invisalign will be. However
            I would like to see cases 2 to 3 years post treatment to
determine stability, before incorporating it into my practice.
    3) The cost is high is comparison to traditional orthodontic therapy

I have not had anyone insist on being treated with Invisalign, but I
have no qualms about sending them to someone else if they do

What is interesting is that many of the people who ask about the
Invisalign system are skeptical about it and feel it will not work.

I had the opportunity to see one add last evening, I was curious where
they found someone with braces that large? and he could have brushed
before his close-up? Since I have been in practice for 21 years I've
seen enough new and improved things come and go, I have no problem
incorporating new techniques in my office but I need to see long term
results before I make the leap. I also remember what one of my
professors told me about new techniques. Always ask to see the failures,
and if they tell you there are none, then stay away because nothing
works 100% of the time.

I feel that we should just sit back see what happens, we've had this
occur before and orthodontics has managed to survive. However, I do take
offense at the statement that orthodontics is in the horse and buggy
stage, not a good way to win friends and influence people.

Ralph M. Perreca, D.D.S



Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 11:48:35 EDT
From: Drted35@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Cc: bryan@aligntech.com
Subject: Invisalign: Actual experience
Message-ID: <95.139049a.27076553@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear fellow ESCOlytes;
    My website (drted.com) usually experiences about 40M hits which
translates to about 2000 unique visitors.  This month as a result of
Invisalign's ad campaign my site experienced just under 100M.  I'm inpressed.
It tells me folk are very, very intersted in this technique.  It also tell me
that AT is our ally, not teh enemy. As a result this week I have scheduled
16+ consultations 7 of whom have resulted from this ad campaign.  I am a
certified provider of Invisalign and have 7 patients under way. I offer it to
every patient who fits their formuala: "mild-moderate" cases of crowding and
spacing.  Where I am uncertain I send the company the PVS's and let them
advise me. My fee for Invisalign upper and lower is presently $6585.  $7985
for lingual upper and clear lower. I have not encountered any problems in
mixing techniques where it is appropriate. In fact, patients seem quite
pleased that in some cases they can mix and match lingual with clear or
Invisalign.  Choose your candidates for Invisalign with care and advise your
patients at the start of the possible need to default to lingual or clear in
the event of patient burnout  or the correction not materializing. What is
important to remember is that many patients are not good candidates:
children, extraction cases, open bites, deep vertical overbites, etc and
therefore you have the legitimate option of introducing them to other
alternatives that they could well choose: lingual and clear-transparent  for
instance.  What appears to be good for the public is good for all of us as
well.  As long as I can default to alternative treatment options without any
financial loss I owe it to myself, my patients and my profession to be on the
cutting edge of this latest, and I believe here-to-stay, technique.  When AT
goes public It is a buy for me.
Cordially, Ted  P.s. Some downers:  1. A  two year case will cost us about
$2300 2. Initial delivery time is 6-8 weeks.  3. Storage space: Align's
packaging is presently way too cumbersome. Some uppers: 1. Chair time is
lessened. 2. This new generation of techies enjoys going to the Invisalign
site and viewing the animated treatment plan simultaneous with their wearing
the aligners 3. No dietary restrictions, no broken brackets, no lost
chair-time due to rebonding.   What we need now is to hear the "horror
stories" (if there are any) from the guys in the trenches who are using the
Invisalign technique now.  Recordially, Ted  ;-)   
Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 11:35:37 -0700
From: Zia Chishti <zia@aligntech.com>
To: "'orthod-l@usc.edu'" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Align Technology Response To Posts in Digest 725
Message-ID: <BCCA78F2FD3ED41183DA00E0811059BB685CF8@2ndexchange.aligntech.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"

Dear Fellow ESCO Members,

I am the Chairman and CEO of Align Technology, Inc., manufacturers of the
Invisalign System.

In ESCO Digest #725 there were six postings regarding Invisalign.

Dr Bedi from Delhi, India asked for websites that would have information
regarding Invisalign.  In addition to our own website (www.invisalign.com)
there are several websites that have information on us.  A short list
includes:

http://www.oc-j.com/products/Invisalign.htm
http://www.channel2000.com/news/health/stories/news-health-990907-141252.htm
l
http://www.dentistsonmain.com/web_pages/cosmetic_3.htm
http://ebody.com/orthodontics/articles/200005/article1076.html
http://www.wfla.com/health/457.htm

A Google or other search engine search on "Invisalign" will also show up
many more sites with information on the Invisalign System.

Dr Kahn suggests that merchants not be allowed to post on the ESCO site.  I
acknowledge Dr. Kahn's comments, but offer that greater dialog will only
contribute to greater ultimate knowledge and understanding.  Trying to choke
off information will do everyone a disservice. 

The ESCO recommendations for posting guide us to establishing our identity
and purpose for posting early on in our messages.  I try to do so at the
outset.  Should anyone choose not to want to read my postings, I submit that
the burden of moving past them is no more than a few seconds of time.  By
design, posting to ESCO does not *force* anyone to read a particular
article.

Four of the remaining six postings are from Dr. Schuler.  Dr. Schuler's main
points are:

1.  I have no right to state my interpretation of his posting.
2.  I imply that he is ignorant.
3.  An apology to me for hurting my feelings.
4.  A request for an apology on my part for hurting his feelings.
5.  He has had no patients ask for the Invisalign System.
6.  It is not good practice for the CEO of a Company to aggressively respond
to a questioning of the long term viability of such a Company.
7.  Invisalign has an inflamatory response in the periodontal membrane of
patients.
8.  A questioning of the effectiveness and appropriateness of our
advertising.
9.  A questioning of the mechanism of charging patients for Invisalign.

In order:

Dr. Schuler's precise posting which led me to infer a belief on his part
regarding Invisalign was:  "How about a general comment on Invisalign.  Who
thinks it will be with us 2 years from now and who will be left holding the
bag?"  My opinion is that were Dr. Schuler less skeptical in his standpoint,
he might have phrased his question more along the lines of  "Do any of my
colleagues know the business position of Align Technology?  I am concerned
because I would like to be certain that the Company will be capable of
supporting the profession over the long term."  If my interpretation of Dr.
Schuler's posting was incorrect, than I apologize.  If not, then my comments
stand.

Were Dr. Schuler aware of our business position, I do not believe he would
have asked his question both in the form and substance that he did.  If this
is so, Dr. Schuler was indeed uninformed about us.

If Dr. Schuler is genuinely apologizing for hurting the feelings of the 1100
employees of Align Technology, I accept the apology.

If I have hurt Dr. Schuler's feelings, I apologize.

Align Technology is doing its best to drive consumer demand for the
Invisalign System.  We drive referrals primarily to "Tier I" and "Tier II"
doctors who have vocally advocated their desire to treat patients with
Invisalign System and have fully positioned their practices to take
advantage of the referrals we send their way.  Dr. Schuler is a "Tier III"
doctor which, in our framework, refers to doctors that have been trained and
have purchased the PVS system but who have not strongly voiced their desire
to participate in our referral program or have an area of practice
development that indicates a lack of preparedness in being able to handle
Align Technology driven referrals.  This perhaps explains some of why Dr.
Schuler has not received patient inquiries.  Should Dr. Schuler -- or any of
our orthodontist partners -- like us to do so, we would be happy to work
with them to develop their practices to Tier I or Tier II status. 

I disagree with Dr. Schuler's view that a CEO of Company should not respond
aggressively to a statement questioning the Company's viability.  The two
examples Dr. Schuler chooses to make his case are of Jeff Bezos at
Amazon.com and Michael Eisner at Disney.  Jeff Bezos is actually a peer of
mine:  Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers was the first venture capital
investor in both Amazon.com as well as Align Technology.  Jeff Bezos in fact
responds very aggressively to statements regarding the long-term viability
of Amazon.com.  For recent reference, please refer to an interview of him in
the Red Herring October 2000 issue.  Here is the online link:
(http://www.redherring.com/mag/issue83/mag-bezos-83.html).  The Eisner /
Euro Disney example is inappropriate:  even if EuroDisney failed, the long
term health of the Walt Disney Company (which is a minority shareholder in
EuroDisney) would never come into question.  Even so, Mike Eisner responds
very aggressively to negative comments regarding the effects of the Euro
Disney debacle on the Walt Disney Company.  For reference, please read
Fortune's April 1995 article on Disney and Mike Eisner.  Here is the online
link
(http://library.northernlight.com/SG19990714090001744.html?cb=13&sc=0#doc).
You might have to read little deep into this article before you hear
Eisner's most aggressive responses to what was an uncontestible failure.
Quite the reverse of Dr. Schuler's assertion, it is the duty of a CEO to
speak to the integrity of his Company particularly when challenged in a
public forum.

A mild inflamatory response in the periodontal ligament and supporting
tissue as the result of orthodontic treatment is perfectly normal and
consistent with all orthodontic treatment.  Excessive force, however, can
result in an uncontrolled such inflamatory response which can slow or even
halt orthodontic movement and potentially increase root resorption (I am not
aware of any published studies on this specific concern, although this is a
common belief in the academic community).  By design, the Invisalign System
limits the amount of force applied to a particular tooth and, accordingly,
reduces the potential for both inflamation and root resorption.  If Dr.
Schuler has experienced an aggressive inflamatory response with the use of
the Invisalign System, this would be the first such recorded incident in
over 6,000 cases and we would be priviliged if Dr. Schuler would allow us to
investigate.

By all accounts, our advertising has been extraordinarily effective.  In the
ten days since we initiated advertising, we have generated over 80,000
referrals to our Tier I and Tier II orthodontists.  If Dr. Schuler is
sensitive to the contrast we draw between treatment with traditional metal
appliances and Invisalign aligners, we ask why?

While at Align Technology we have no control over what doctors choose to
charge their patients, we do have a few suggestions.  To price the
Invisalign System treatment to patients, we submit that the amount of
physical labor an orthodontist need put in to treating a given case goes
down dramatically with Invisalign.  Many cases can be treated with as little
as an hour or two of effort.  In using the Invisalign System, orthodontists
need no longer purchase the metal appliances, another source of savings.
Also, the Invisalign System allows orthodontists to attract new patients
that would otherwise not have sought treatment.  With these factors in mind,
many orthodontists are charging fees that are equivalent to what they charge
with metal braces.  The majority of orthodontists we survey are charging a
small premium for the treatment, typically in line with what they would
charge for ceramic braces or other such more aesthetic alternatives.  Our
sales representatives in the field are happy to help develop pricing
strategies with individual doctors who might make such a request.

Best regards to the ESCO membership,


Zia Chishti
Chairman & CEO
Align Technology, Inc.
Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 16:34:40 -0400
From: g russell frankel <gr5@cinci.rr.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: invisalign
Message-ID: <39D64E60.49610F1A@cinci.rr.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

cannot believe the calls i have been getting on this product this week.
evidntly, there is a powerful commercial on tv.  even though i took the
course and then accidently heard boyd speak on it two weeks later in
more dramatic detail, i have refused every one.  total costs for me and
the patient, especially after the new price list that came out a couple
of weeks ago, plus the distinct uncertainty of a precise end result have
shaped my thinking. usually i am a leader in utilizing innovations, but
this time i'll it out and observe for some time.  (probably retire by
then).  the only thing i think i would use it for is spacing upper
anteriors for veneers.  limitations, limitations.

g r frankel
cioncinnati

Date: Sat, 30 Sep 2000 23:16:10 -0700
From: "Office" <office@nordstromd.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: ORTHOD-L digest 725
Message-ID: <LOBBIGKBIBJJCIHOGNFIAEGBCCAA.office@nordstromd.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dr. Schuler's comments are what we are hoping to hear on this forum. The
response from the young lady could have respectfully been submitted
directly. There is obviously a failure on the part of Invisalign, and
reputable companies typically strive to resolve these issues. The problem
might well be due to a muturity issue and lack of classical business skills.

Dr. Nordstrom

Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2000 17:44:20 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalgn results
Message-ID: <000201c02ce6$1d553ec0$e237d7d1@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0061_01C02A3C.E5931580"

Members,
 
I just finished aligners on one patient that had 5mm of crowding.  The aligners only corrected it approx. 80%.  So far I am not seeing total correction with the cases.
 
Roy King
Date: Fri, 29 Sep 2000 17:40:27 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <000101c02ce6$1b9936e0$e237d7d1@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_003B_01C02A3C.5B1FF800"

Dear members,
 
I hate to see 25% increase in setup fee and aligner fee.  Recently my referral dentist has been coming up to me to inform me that it is only a matter of time before general practitioners will be doing Invisalign.  Even the GP knows now.
 
Roy King
Date: Mon, 2 Oct 2000 23:43:34 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign price increase
Message-ID: <015101c02cec$1c4baf40$e237d7d1@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_014E_01C02CCA.943E4A20"

Dear Members,
 
We now know that the price increase is a result of the demand( Basic econnomics).  So if we want to decrease the price, we need to decrease the demand as Zia Chishti has informed us.  Thanks for the info.
 
Respectfully submitted
Roy King
Dear Fellow ESCO Members,
 
This note is in response to recent postings by Dr. John Schuler and Dr. Vaughn Johnson regarding Invisalign.
 
I am the Chairman and CEO of Align Technology, the manufacturer of the Invisalign System.
 
Dr. Schuler's posting is inflamatory.  Although his posting is in the form of a question, it implies Dr. Schuler's belief that Align Technology will not survive greater than two years and, as a consequence, the orthodontic profession will be left without Align Technology's support.
 
Perhaps Dr. Schuler is not aware of our organization.  Briefly:
 
1.  We employ over 1100 people worldwide, more than the top three orthodontic manufacturers combined.
2.  We have over $150 million in capital with over $10 billion in additional financial resources available to us through our financial partners.
3.  We have trained over 4300 orthodontists in the U.S. on the use of the Invisalign System.
4.  Over 2000 orthodontists are already Align Technology customers.
5.  We are the fastest-growing orthodontic company in history.
6.  The vast majority of patients and orthodontists that have used the Invisalign System are highly enthusiastic about their experience.
 
Dr. Johnson's posting regarding our recent price increase could be interpreted as humorous, but, in the interest of clarity, I would like to state that our price changes were not in response to any balance sheet constraint.  In fact, we have no outstanding material financial debts at all.  Instead, our price changes were consistent with the costs of running our business and the current level of demand we are facing from our customers.
 
At Align we are doing our best to improve the selection of treatments that orthodontists can offer their patients.  We urge our partners in the orthodontic community to support our efforts to help them.  Inflamatory, reactionary or cynical postings do a disservice to the broader orthodontic community and are disheartening to the 1100 employees of Align.  If there are legitimate questions about Align Technology or the Invisalign System, we would be delighted to speak to them directly.
 
Sincerely
 
 
Zia Chishti
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Align Technology, Inc.
Sunnyvale, California
 
 
-----Original Message-----
From: orthod-l@usc.edu [mailto:orthod-l@usc.edu]
Sent: Saturday, September 16, 2000 2:34 AM
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 722

ORTHOD-L Digest 722 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Invisalign by John Schuler 3) Re: invsalign by "Vaughn Johnson" 4) Automated Cephalometric Landmark recognition by "jm" 5) 3d occlusogram by Glen Armstrong 6) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 719 by George Wang 7) Patient to London by "CARLOS ENRIQUE GOMEZ" 8) Re: corso di bio1 by webmaster@siob.it

Date: Tue, 3 Oct 2000 00:02:23 -0400
From: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Fw: Invisalign
Message-ID: <01b601c02cee$bd4aac00$e237d7d1@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

John,

You have some very good points.  Has Zia offered an apology.
Sincerely,
Roy King

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 727

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Missing Indiana Teen
        by Kevin Jarrell <kjarrell@sprynet.com>
  3) Re: Invisalign
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  4) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 726
        by "John L. Schuler D.D.S., M.S." <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  5) Re: Align Technology Response To Posts in Digest 725
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  6) Re: Invisalgn results
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  7) Invisalign
        by "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
  8) Re: Invisalign
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  9) ankylosed canines
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2000 10:07:34 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001006100734.008a2560@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

34




Date: Thu, 05 Oct 2000 19:25:32 -0500
From: Kevin Jarrell <kjarrell@sprynet.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Missing Indiana Teen
Message-ID: <39DD1BFC.EE34A7CE@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/mixed;
 boundary="------------00679AA8C9B989C7BFF4D6AC"

Dear Members,
One of our practice's patients has been reported missing from our
practice in Kokomo, Indiana.  He is a 16 year old male named Mike
Burleson.  He has been missing since September 13 when he came home from
school, collected several personal belongings and left his house.  He is
believed to be a runaway.  He is approximately 5'4" tall and 115
pounds.  He may be driving a 1989 black Buick LeSabre with a Texas
license plate.  He has had braces on for several months and I am posting
this message in case he may show up in an office with an emergency
problem claiming to be on vacation, etc.  He may wear a yellow baseball
cap backwards (he often did in our office)  I will attach his photo to
this message, but in case it doesn't get forwarded please view it at
http://www.flyingmonk.simplenet.com/mburleson.html
Please contact the other specialists in your area with this information
as I know not everyone subscribes to ESCO.  If you have any information,
please contact Det. Steve Rogers at the Howard County Sheriff Department
at (765) 456-2031 or Det. Gary Stout at the Tipton County Police
Department at (765) 675-2152.

Thanks,
Kevin T. Jarrell

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2000 06:31:50 -0400
From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
To: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <00dd01c02dee$4ed7b640$97075a18@gw.totalweb.net>
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Roy King wrote:
 
"I hate to see 25% increase in setup fee and aligner fee.  Recently my referral dentist has been coming up to me to inform me that it is only a matter of time before general practitioners will be doing Invisalign.  Even the GP knows now."
 
-------------------------------
 
So what's new?  If a general dentist pays more attention to malalignment, we will get more referrals.  If he stumbles in his orthodontic efforts, we will get more referrals.  If he is just getting started in orthodontic treatment, he will stumble.  If a the dentist has paid Invisalign a fee, perhaps that opens Invisalign to liability, especially if Invisalign has participated in the diagnosis and treatment plan which seems to me inherent in the lab services. 
 
Anything that generates interest in straight teeth and eventual recognition that we, orthodontists, have the special knowledge required to get the job done properly is excellent.  So, Invisalign pump your services, dentists perform orthodontic treatment, lawyers sue to your hearts content.  Let capitalism thrive as will we.
 
Dr. Ron Parsons
Orthodontist
Atlanta, GA
Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2000 05:50:07 -0500
From: "John L. Schuler D.D.S., M.S." <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: ORTHOD-L digest 726
Message-ID: <00a701c02df0$dc66cee0$63141118@peoria1.il.home.com>
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Dear Dr. Chishti,

I'm sorry, I did not know you were an orthodontist.  Where did you do your
training? Possibly we have mutual friends. I did however, appreciate the
orthodontic lecture.  I'll pass this ground breaking information on to my
residents.  It also helps if you know how to spell inflammatory.

John L. Schuler D.D.S., M.S.
Peoria, Il
Associate Professor of Orthodontics
University of Louisville

<<A mild inflamatory response in the periodontal ligament and supporting
tissue as the result of orthodontic treatment is perfectly normal and
consistent with all orthodontic treatment.  Excessive force, however, can
result in an uncontrolled such inflamatory response which can slow or even
halt orthodontic movement and potentially increase root resorption (I am not
aware of any published studies on this specific concern, although this is a
common belief in the academic community).  By design, the Invisalign System
limits the amount of force applied to a particular tooth and, accordingly,
reduces the potential for both inflamation and root resorption.  If Dr.
Schuler has experienced an aggressive inflamatory response with the use of
the Invisalign System, this would be the first such recorded incident in
over 6,000 cases and we would be priviliged if Dr. Schuler would allow us to
investigate.>>

P.S. Even though you are an orthodontic colleague, could you please not give
out what I assumed was privileged information regarding my practice over the
internet?

<<Align Technology is doing its best to drive consumer demand for the
Invisalign System.  We drive referrals primarily to "Tier I" and "Tier II"
doctors who have vocally advocated their desire to treat patients with
Invisalign System and have fully positioned their practices to take
advantage of the referrals we send their way.  Dr. Schuler is a "Tier III"
doctor which, in our framework, refers to doctors that have been trained and
have purchased the PVS system but who have not strongly voiced their desire
to participate in our referral program or have an area of practice
development that indicates a lack of preparedness in being able to handle
Align Technology driven referrals.  This perhaps explains some of why Dr.
Schuler has not received patient inquiries.  Should Dr. Schuler -- or any of
our orthodontist partners -- like us to do so, we would be happy to work
with them to develop their practices to Tier I or Tier II status.>>

P.S.S To my ESCO friends and true colleagues:  Do you appreciate the way
Dr.? Chishti has responded to my postings?




----- Original Message -----
From: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2000 4:34 AM
Subject: ORTHOD-L digest 726



Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2000 12:50:23 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Zia Chishti" <zia@aligntech.com>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Align Technology Response To Posts in Digest 725
Message-ID: <002b01c02e23$3111ff50$0e00000a@paul>
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To the chairman and CEO and other interested parties,

I appreciate hearing your perspective and taking time to respond to this
audience.  Understandably, the corporatization of health care has resulted
in some skepticsm among those of us familiar with the cottage industry
approach.  The bottomline often seems to be the primary concern.  eg.
Infocure, which has purchased management software companies and then
discontinued support in an effort to bolster the bottomline...leaving the
customer "high and dry".  A look at their stock trend over the last 10
months (37.4 to 3.5) is certainly of concern for someone depending on them.
http://finance.yahoo.com/q?s=incx&d=b

The skeptic wonders how ATI would respond in a similar circumstance.

You mention I, II and III tier doctors, but when this question was addressed
at the certification workshop in Reno last Sunday, your staff was unable to
provide any firm details regarding how one is assigned to a tier.  It's
difficult to achieve a goal if the goal is unknown or at best, a moving
target.

I will give credit for a staff person stating non-orthodontists are not
being certified.  In fact, a non-orthodontist in the audience was miffed
that he had attended and could not be certified.  Will ATI continue this
policy or will that change depending on the "bottomline"?  A skeptic would
suspect that you are being "politically correct" for the moment, but how
long will that last?

I personally am willing to take a cautiously optimistic view until proven
otherwise.  The seminar stresses limited application and I appreciate your
cautious approach in that regard.  Worst case is ATI creates some consumer
interest and awareness which will result in some patients coming in who
might not otherwise seek consultation.

Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Departments of Orthodontics and
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Manning Drive
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514




----- Original Message -----
From: "Zia Chishti" <zia@aligntech.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Saturday, September 30, 2000 2:35 PM
Subject: Align Technology Response To Posts in Digest 725


> Dear Fellow ESCO Members,
>
> I am the Chairman and CEO of Align Technology, Inc., manufacturers of the
> Invisalign System.
>
> In ESCO Digest #725 there were six postings regarding Invisalign.
>
> Dr Bedi from Delhi, India asked for websites that would have information
> regarding Invisalign.  In addition to our own website (www.invisalign.com)
> there are several websites that have information on us.  A short list
> includes:
>
> http://www.oc-j.com/products/Invisalign.htm
>
http://www.channel2000.com/news/health/stories/news-health-990907-141252.htm
> l
> http://www.dentistsonmain.com/web_pages/cosmetic_3.htm
> http://ebody.com/orthodontics/articles/200005/article1076.html
> http://www.wfla.com/health/457.htm
>
> A Google or other search engine search on "Invisalign" will also show up
> many more sites with information on the Invisalign System.
>
> Dr Kahn suggests that merchants not be allowed to post on the ESCO site.
I
> acknowledge Dr. Kahn's comments, but offer that greater dialog will only
> contribute to greater ultimate knowledge and understanding.  Trying to
choke
> off information will do everyone a disservice.
>
> The ESCO recommendations for posting guide us to establishing our identity
> and purpose for posting early on in our messages.  I try to do so at the
> outset.  Should anyone choose not to want to read my postings, I submit
that
> the burden of moving past them is no more than a few seconds of time.  By
> design, posting to ESCO does not *force* anyone to read a particular
> article.
>
> Four of the remaining six postings are from Dr. Schuler.  Dr. Schuler's
main
> points are:
>
> 1.  I have no right to state my interpretation of his posting.
> 2.  I imply that he is ignorant.
> 3.  An apology to me for hurting my feelings.
> 4.  A request for an apology on my part for hurting his feelings.
> 5.  He has had no patients ask for the Invisalign System.
> 6.  It is not good practice for the CEO of a Company to aggressively
respond
> to a questioning of the long term viability of such a Company.
> 7.  Invisalign has an inflamatory response in the periodontal membrane of
> patients.
> 8.  A questioning of the effectiveness and appropriateness of our
> advertising.
> 9.  A questioning of the mechanism of charging patients for Invisalign.
>
> In order:
>
> Dr. Schuler's precise posting which led me to infer a belief on his part
> regarding Invisalign was:  "How about a general comment on Invisalign.
Who
> thinks it will be with us 2 years from now and who will be left holding
the
> bag?"  My opinion is that were Dr. Schuler less skeptical in his
standpoint,
> he might have phrased his question more along the lines of  "Do any of my
> colleagues know the business position of Align Technology?  I am concerned
> because I would like to be certain that the Company will be capable of
> supporting the profession over the long term."  If my interpretation of
Dr.
> Schuler's posting was incorrect, than I apologize.  If not, then my
comments
> stand.
>
> Were Dr. Schuler aware of our business position, I do not believe he would
> have asked his question both in the form and substance that he did.  If
this
> is so, Dr. Schuler was indeed uninformed about us.
>
> If Dr. Schuler is genuinely apologizing for hurting the feelings of the
1100
> employees of Align Technology, I accept the apology.
>
> If I have hurt Dr. Schuler's feelings, I apologize.
>
> Align Technology is doing its best to drive consumer demand for the
> Invisalign System.  We drive referrals primarily to "Tier I" and "Tier II"
> doctors who have vocally advocated their desire to treat patients with
> Invisalign System and have fully positioned their practices to take
> advantage of the referrals we send their way.  Dr. Schuler is a "Tier III"
> doctor which, in our framework, refers to doctors that have been trained
and
> have purchased the PVS system but who have not strongly voiced their
desire
> to participate in our referral program or have an area of practice
> development that indicates a lack of preparedness in being able to handle
> Align Technology driven referrals.  This perhaps explains some of why Dr.
> Schuler has not received patient inquiries.  Should Dr. Schuler -- or any
of
> our orthodontist partners -- like us to do so, we would be happy to work
> with them to develop their practices to Tier I or Tier II status.
>
> I disagree with Dr. Schuler's view that a CEO of Company should not
respond
> aggressively to a statement questioning the Company's viability.  The two
> examples Dr. Schuler chooses to make his case are of Jeff Bezos at
> Amazon.com and Michael Eisner at Disney.  Jeff Bezos is actually a peer of
> mine:  Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers was the first venture capital
> investor in both Amazon.com as well as Align Technology.  Jeff Bezos in
fact
> responds very aggressively to statements regarding the long-term viability
> of Amazon.com.  For recent reference, please refer to an interview of him
in
> the Red Herring October 2000 issue.  Here is the online link:
> (http://www.redherring.com/mag/issue83/mag-bezos-83.html).  The Eisner /
> Euro Disney example is inappropriate:  even if EuroDisney failed, the long
> term health of the Walt Disney Company (which is a minority shareholder in
> EuroDisney) would never come into question.  Even so, Mike Eisner responds
> very aggressively to negative comments regarding the effects of the Euro
> Disney debacle on the Walt Disney Company.  For reference, please read
> Fortune's April 1995 article on Disney and Mike Eisner.  Here is the
online
> link
>
(http://library.northernlight.com/SG19990714090001744.html?cb=13&sc=0#doc).
> You might have to read little deep into this article before you hear
> Eisner's most aggressive responses to what was an uncontestible failure.
> Quite the reverse of Dr. Schuler's assertion, it is the duty of a CEO to
> speak to the integrity of his Company particularly when challenged in a
> public forum.
>
> A mild inflamatory response in the periodontal ligament and supporting
> tissue as the result of orthodontic treatment is perfectly normal and
> consistent with all orthodontic treatment.  Excessive force, however, can
> result in an uncontrolled such inflamatory response which can slow or even
> halt orthodontic movement and potentially increase root resorption (I am
not
> aware of any published studies on this specific concern, although this is
a
> common belief in the academic community).  By design, the Invisalign
System
> limits the amount of force applied to a particular tooth and, accordingly,
> reduces the potential for both inflamation and root resorption.  If Dr.
> Schuler has experienced an aggressive inflamatory response with the use of
> the Invisalign System, this would be the first such recorded incident in
> over 6,000 cases and we would be priviliged if Dr. Schuler would allow us
to
> investigate.
>
> By all accounts, our advertising has been extraordinarily effective.  In
the
> ten days since we initiated advertising, we have generated over 80,000
> referrals to our Tier I and Tier II orthodontists.  If Dr. Schuler is
> sensitive to the contrast we draw between treatment with traditional metal
> appliances and Invisalign aligners, we ask why?
>
> While at Align Technology we have no control over what doctors choose to
> charge their patients, we do have a few suggestions.  To price the
> Invisalign System treatment to patients, we submit that the amount of
> physical labor an orthodontist need put in to treating a given case goes
> down dramatically with Invisalign.  Many cases can be treated with as
little
> as an hour or two of effort.  In using the Invisalign System,
orthodontists
> need no longer purchase the metal appliances, another source of savings.
> Also, the Invisalign System allows orthodontists to attract new patients
> that would otherwise not have sought treatment.  With these factors in
mind,
> many orthodontists are charging fees that are equivalent to what they
charge
> with metal braces.  The majority of orthodontists we survey are charging a
> small premium for the treatment, typically in line with what they would
> charge for ceramic braces or other such more aesthetic alternatives.  Our
> sales representatives in the field are happy to help develop pricing
> strategies with individual doctors who might make such a request.
>
> Best regards to the ESCO membership,
>
>
> Zia Chishti
> Chairman & CEO
> Align Technology, Inc.
>

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2000 12:53:09 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Invisalgn results
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Good information, Roy....that was my impression looking at the treated cases at the seminar.  Did you use any of the "blips" of composite they are now suggesting to get a better "grip" on selected teeth?
 
     -=Paul=-
 
Paul M. Thomas
 

 
----- Original Message -----
From: Roy King
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Sent: Friday, September 29, 2000 5:44 PM
Subject: Invisalgn results

Members,
 
I just finished aligners on one patient that had 5mm of crowding.  The aligners only corrected it approx. 80%.  So far I am not seeing total correction with the cases.
 
Roy King

Date: Thu, 5 Oct 2000 20:21:20 +0800
From: "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <008b01c02ec6$c7302f40$3dd215a5@oemcomputer>
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Content-Type: text/plain;
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Dear member;

I (not trained at all in invisalign) was just wondering, after viewing the
website of invisalign (http://www.invisalign.com) on the past cases report,
that it may be just cheaper for the patients with most of the type of
malocclusions potrayed to be treated with clear spring positioners or
removable appliances (although you may issue a few of such appliances).  I
wonder whether it (invisalign) can be used for a more difficult cases
requiring bicuspids extractions.

I guess the cost would be very intimidating for most people in the world
(probably not in America).  Care to share the view on removable appliances
vs invisalign?

Tengku
Singapore

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2000 12:56:54 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Roy King" <rkking@bellsouth.net>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <004101c02e24$1a032d10$0e00000a@paul>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_003E_01C02E02.925A5620"

This is what disturbs me somewhat.  I seriously doubt that ATI will continue their present policy of "orthodontists only".  Witness Nobel Biocare who originally would sell only to surgeons certified in university based courses.  Now anybody with some $$ can order a handful of implants and start plugging them in.  Again....it all comes back to the bottom line...
 
Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Departments of Orthodontics and
Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Manning Drive
Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27514
 
 
 
----- Original Message -----
From: Roy King
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Sent: Friday, September 29, 2000 5:40 PM
Subject: Invisalign

Dear members,
 
I hate to see 25% increase in setup fee and aligner fee.  Recently my referral dentist has been coming up to me to inform me that it is only a matter of time before general practitioners will be doing Invisalign.  Even the GP knows now.
 
Roy King

Date: Wed, 4 Oct 2000 17:26:10 EDT
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: ankylosed canines
Message-ID: <7a.b060748.270cfa72@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear all,

Need some help with this one.

20 year old patient in braces almost 24 months.  Uncovered both max canines
in December 98 and the right one come into place quite nicely.  The left one
has not moved.  It appears to be neither buccal or lingual but right in the
alveolar bone at the level of the gingiva.  The bracket and a very small
amount of tooth is about level with the gingiva halfway between tooth 22
(left lateral) and 24 (left bicuspid). 

About a year ago, I realized that tooth 22 was going gingivally and 23 was
not moving.  Referred back to the OS and she suggested to the patient that
the tooth was not moving because I did not have adequate space and to have me
make more room so 23 would have room to erupt.  Like I'm new at this.

Anyway, unless I wanted to fight it out with the OS and since my mom told me
never to fight with girls, I releveled, made sure there was enough space
(like 13 mm) and watched tooth 22 go gingival again.  That's how you waste
this much time.

Now what are my patients options other than an implant?  She and her family
want to know what can be done short of an implant or, if nothing can be done,
they are prepared for the implant.

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Thanks

Charlie Ruff Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\mburleson1.jpg" ORTHOD-L Digest 728 Topics covered in this issue include: 1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics by Joseph Zernik 2) Severely decayed first molars by Alan Bobkin 3) Re: Incisor apices by YURFEST@aol.com 4) incisor apices by elie amm 5) Re: ankylosed canines by MDLoffice 6) Re: ankylosed canines by "Jeff Genecov" 7) impacted canine of Ruff by ray.siat@xtra.co.nz 8) Re: ankylosed canine by "B. Cohanim" 9) Re: ankylosed canines by "Paul M. Thomas" 10) Anklosed Cainine by JMer1997@aol.com 11) Re: ankylosed canines by Ted Schipper 12) Charlie's Impacted Cuspid, i.e., his Patient's by "Mort & Gayle Speck" 13) ankylosed canines by Carlos Crignola Riccardi 14) Re: Invisalign by DraKahn@aol.com 15) Align Technology response by Zia Chishti 16) Invisalign - just a thought... by Barry Raphael 17) more on Align Tech by Rick Walker 18) orthodontist in Granada by Ciro Moraes Barros Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2000 20:09:17 -0700 From: Joseph Zernik To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001009200917.007ac100@hsc.usc.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Colleague: The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for distribution of professional information. * What information can you get on ESCO? * How to subscribe to ESCO? * How to change your address? * How to post messages on ESCO? For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site: http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm Enjoy! Sincerely, Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D. Professor, Department of Orthodontics University of Southern California http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/ 35 Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2000 10:50:12 -0400 (EDT) From: Alan Bobkin To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Severely decayed first molars Message-ID: <200010071450.e97EoCU26169@kimberlite.wwonline.com> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" I would appreciate some opinions regarding a case. A nine year old girl was referred to me for my opinion. She has a Class I occlusion. Her 6's and upper and lower incisors are erupted. There is mild crowding of the upper and lower anteriors but this is probably not an extraction case. Her 16, 26, and 36 are severely decayed to the point that over half the crowns are missing (what we would have called bombed out). Who would extract the three molars? Who would opt for RCT, posts and crowns? Why? Alan Bobkin Toronto, Ontario Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2000 10:55:13 EDT From: YURFEST@aol.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: Incisor apices Message-ID: <9c.7ef2a0b.27109351@aol.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I experienced apical "protrusion" on several occasions when anteriors were retracted on round wires and the patient did not return for 6 or so months. I added an ART torqueing auxiliary to help get the roots back. There did not appear to be any long term problems. Paul Yurfest GA Date: Sun, 8 Oct 2000 08:06:05 -0400 (EDT) From: elie amm To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: incisor apices Message-ID: <381212694.971006765189.JavaMail.root@web349-mc> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit dear dr Kabir, your name means great in arabic, and you must be KABIR enough to know that straight wire appliances don't fit all cases, there is no automatic appliance at all. i think that you are using a pretorqued bracket without the expression of the torque, you said that you added torque on your wire, so you lost the advantage of what you paid for,(keeping straight). maybe you put your bracket upside down, or you are in undersized wire or you activated a lot. sincerely, Elie Amm. ______________________________________________ FREE Personalized Email at Mail.com Sign up at http://www.mail.com/?sr=signup Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2000 16:36:46 -0700 From: MDLoffice To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ankylosed canines Message-ID: <39DE620E.FB1657B0@adelphia.net> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hey Charlie: 1) Get a new OS to refer to. 2) Is there enough tooth showing that it can be used as an implant so that a crown can be placed on this tooth? I am not sure at what level the marginal gingiva is so cosmetics might be questionable. At least she is old enough that you know there should not be any additional movement of the adjacent teeth via passive eruption. If the tooth is ankylosed it sounds like the perfect implant to me. Even if it is down in the bone, an RCT with post can be fabricated to give the dentist the height to place a crown. Mark -- Mark David Lively, DMD mdlively@adelphia.net Lively Orthodontics Stuart, Florida 34994 Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2000 07:05:36 -0500 From: "Jeff Genecov" To: , Subject: Re: ankylosed canines Message-ID: <004f01c03056$ef487dc0$2f1988cf@genecov> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Charlie, Did the oral surgeon luxate the canine, either initially or once the tooth seemed to stop moving? Sometimes the ankylosis is a "pinpoint" and needs to be loosened. That's happened to me. Also, a good reference is a book by Adrian Becker on impacted teeth. Jeff Genecov c0018593@airmail.net -----Original Message----- From: Orthodmd@aol.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Date: Wednesday, October 04, 2000 4:26 PM Subject: ankylosed canines >Dear all, > >Need some help with this one. > >20 year old patient in braces almost 24 months. Uncovered both max canines >in December 98 and the right one come into place quite nicely. The left one >has not moved. It appears to be neither buccal or lingual but right in the >alveolar bone at the level of the gingiva. The bracket and a very small >amount of tooth is about level with the gingiva halfway between tooth 22 >(left lateral) and 24 (left bicuspid). > >About a year ago, I realized that tooth 22 was going gingivally and 23 was >not moving. Referred back to the OS and she suggested to the patient that >the tooth was not moving because I did not have adequate space and to have me >make more room so 23 would have room to erupt. Like I'm new at this. > >Anyway, unless I wanted to fight it out with the OS and since my mom told me >never to fight with girls, I releveled, made sure there was enough space >(like 13 mm) and watched tooth 22 go gingival again. That's how you waste >this much time. > >Now what are my patients options other than an implant? She and her family >want to know what can be done short of an implant or, if nothing can be done, >they are prepared for the implant. > >Any thoughts would be appreciated. > >Thanks > >Charlie Ruff > Date: Sat, Oct 7 2000 21:58:05 GMT+0000 From: ray.siat@xtra.co.nz To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: impacted canine of Ruff Message-ID: <20001007220324.RSRB1628747.mta2-rme.xtra.co.nz@smtp.xtra.co.nz> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit 1. Anklyosed a. leave in place (tooth "in the bank") & prosth replacement. b. surgically reposition after growth completed +/- endo. c. extract and implant. I prefer a. or b. Implant can be done if b. fails. 2. Is direction of eruptive force going thru the center of the tooth in profile (take periapical with force system in place)? If so, you're trying to translate the whole tooth thru bone rather than vertically erupting it. Since ther whole tooth is in bone, the tooth's center of resistance is at the geometric center of the whole tooth (crown + root). Had one of these in my early years of practice. It erupted once I realized what was going on and changed the direction of the applied force (easier to happen then when surgeons ligated around the crown-CEJ: prebonding days of yore). Good luck Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2000 21:43:20 -0700 (PDT) From: "B. Cohanim" To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics Subject: Re: ankylosed canine Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII I have a 21 year old patient with 23 (left max canine) intruded (and 21 & 22 avulsed) in an accident. 23 became ankylosed (after he was MIA for 3 months) and caused intrusion of 24 and 25. The OS suggested a block osteotomy where you cut a block of bone around 23 and then eruptive forces to move the whole block down. Parents and patient have decided to try it so I used the ankylosed canine as an anchor to bring 24 & 25 back in occlusion and he is scheduled for surgery next week. You might want to ask your OS and see what she thinks about the idea. I would also love to hear Adrian Becker's thoughts on this (if you are reading this!) Bobby Cohanim, Seattle Date: Sun, 8 Oct 2000 11:22:09 -0400 From: "Paul M. Thomas" To: , Subject: Re: ankylosed canines Message-ID: <004701c0313c$955f1850$8c711b3f@paul600x> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Charlie, It's been my observation that bringing in impacted canines in adults has a success rate of somewhere around 50:50, give or take. If it doesn't move with normal force systems, I think it's unlikely you will bring it into position. I've tried to bring some in that are "stuck", have gone back and re-luxated the tooth and still had marginally success. When I have been able to luxate and move the tooth, they generally have gone "belly up" with external resorption after a period of time. I don't know if it's worth the effort. If there's a bone defect or deficit, I guess you could argue that bringing the tooth closer will help bring bone for placement of an implant. With the current grafting techniques, I'm not sure it's worth the effort, however. I'd start thinking implant. Some restorative people don't like canine implants. I've done more than a dozen without a failure or problem to this point, so I think their concern is unwarranted. -=Paul=- Paul M. Thomas ----- Original Message ----- From: To: Sent: Wednesday, October 04, 2000 5:26 PM Subject: ankylosed canines > Dear all, > > Need some help with this one. > > 20 year old patient in braces almost 24 months. Uncovered both max canines > in December 98 and the right one come into place quite nicely. The left one > has not moved. It appears to be neither buccal or lingual but right in the > alveolar bone at the level of the gingiva. The bracket and a very small > amount of tooth is about level with the gingiva halfway between tooth 22 > (left lateral) and 24 (left bicuspid). > > About a year ago, I realized that tooth 22 was going gingivally and 23 was > not moving. Referred back to the OS and she suggested to the patient that > the tooth was not moving because I did not have adequate space and to have me > make more room so 23 would have room to erupt. Like I'm new at this. > > Anyway, unless I wanted to fight it out with the OS and since my mom told me > never to fight with girls, I releveled, made sure there was enough space > (like 13 mm) and watched tooth 22 go gingival again. That's how you waste > this much time. > > Now what are my patients options other than an implant? She and her family > want to know what can be done short of an implant or, if nothing can be done, > they are prepared for the implant. > > Any thoughts would be appreciated. > > Thanks > > Charlie Ruff > Date: Sun, 8 Oct 2000 19:23:05 EDT From: JMer1997@aol.com To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Anklosed Cainine Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Charlie, Rather than give up on the canine, have you considered that it may be "spot anklosed"? Dr. Vanarsdall at Penn lectures on this and has treated quite a few (I did my Ortho training there). If I recall correctly, the technique goes like this: Re-expose, insure no bone around the crown of the tooth and then gently luxate the tooth, both to get a sense of the ankleosis and free up the tooth if it is indeed only anklosed in a small spot. If it can moved in the socket, close the flap (he recommends an apically positioned flap leaving the crown exposed which I realize is a whole controversial subject in itself, but in a case like this I would think the less impeding the tooth, the better) then immediate force is placed on the tooth and the tooth is retied every day or every other day, the thought being to quickly erupt the tooth passed the anklosed spot and not allow it to re-ankleose. We are talking 1+ mm of movement per day here to insure that it does not get re stuck. If the tooth was not anklosed to begin with, the cause of the ankleosis could have been a nick of the burr during exposure or possibly some etch getting somewhere where it should not be. The point is that the ankleosis may be small and right near the CEJ/alvelor crest area and you may be able to free up the tooth and work past the ankleosis. If you have the space already and the appliances are on, I would think it would be worth the try. You may want to call Dr Vanarsdall or have your surgeon call him for more details. Good luck and let us all know how it works out. John McDonald Salem, OR Date: Sun, 08 Oct 2000 22:20:19 -0400 From: Ted Schipper To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Re: ankylosed canines Message-ID: <39E12B63.FFCE98E1@utoronto.ca> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit If the tooth is indeed ankylosed it will probably have to be sacrificed. But, try having your OS (the same one or another if she won't co-operate) give the tooth a good "wiggle" in an effort to break any small ankylosed area. This will result in (a) the tooth moving, or (b) further ankylosis and ultimate extraction. It may be more uncomfortable for the patient but IMHO it's worth a try. TGS. Orthodmd@aol.com wrote: > Dear all, > > Need some help with this one. > > 20 year old patient in braces almost 24 months. Uncovered both max canines > in December 98 and the right one come into place quite nicely. The left one > has not moved. It appears to be neither buccal or lingual but right in the > alveolar bone at the level of the gingiva. The bracket and a very small > amount of tooth is about level with the gingiva halfway between tooth 22 > (left lateral) and 24 (left bicuspid). > > About a year ago, I realized that tooth 22 was going gingivally and 23 was > not moving. Referred back to the OS and she suggested to the patient that > the tooth was not moving because I did not have adequate space and to have me > make more room so 23 would have room to erupt. Like I'm new at this. > > Anyway, unless I wanted to fight it out with the OS and since my mom told me > never to fight with girls, I releveled, made sure there was enough space > (like 13 mm) and watched tooth 22 go gingival again. That's how you waste > this much time. > > Now what are my patients options other than an implant? She and her family > want to know what can be done short of an implant or, if nothing can be done, > they are prepared for the implant. > > Any thoughts would be appreciated. > > Thanks > > Charlie Ruff Date: Mon, 9 Oct 2000 13:14:27 -0400 From: "Mort & Gayle Speck" To: Ortho Study Club Subject: Charlie's Impacted Cuspid, i.e., his Patient's Message-ID: <39DA01F4@webmail.med.harvard.edu> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="ISO-8859-1" Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Hi Charlie- It's refreshing to read a non-Invisalign posting! As you well know, dealing with an ankylosed cuspid is problematical at best. Luxating the tooth and then immediately applying light pressure has been known to work, at the risk of devitalization and external resorption. If you go that root(that's a joke!), you could apply pressure with an (.020) auxiliary wire soldered to a heavy base arch between the molar and bicuspid, ligated to the cuspid, and eliminate any reaction on the adjacent teeth. If feasible, a more practical approach might be to root canal the cuspid, build a post to the proper position, and place a crown. I would agree that first creating sufficient space for impacted teeth is of prime importance. Often they will erupt on thir own, more frequently if root development is not complete. It's important to pack the socket so the "tunnel" stays clear of new tissue and bone. My personal feeling is that light traction is important. I recall an article, I believe by Tom Graber, regarding the use of magnets for impacted teeth. What an ideal force; light and constant! On another subject,I favor your tooth identification method (European?) of identifying the quadrant and the tooth, but I'm not certain of its presentation in text. Will someone set the record straight for me: When writing, should the quadrant be identified by a Roman numeral, and should there be a dash between the quadrant and the tooth? I also wonder if there is a mandate for the dental schools to adopt this method. I hope we fare better with this then we did adopting the metric system! Warm regards to you and my friends in cyberspace, Mort Speck Please reply to: (Mort & Gayle Speck) Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2000 20:49:08 -0400 From: Carlos Crignola Riccardi To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: ankylosed canines Message-ID: <3.0.5.32.20001009204908.0084eb90@rdc.cl> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" Dear Charlie, Apply small force with an elevator or forceps to loose the tooth, breaking the bridge from root cementun to bone, and inmediately apply traction by mean of a cantilever spring. Good luck, Carlos Crignola R. ----------------------------------------------------- Click here for Free Video!! http://www.gohip.com/freevideo/ Date: Fri, 06 Oct 2000 19:11:53 EDT From: DraKahn@aol.com To: Subject: Re: Invisalign Message-ID: <31.b11532d.270fb63a@aol.com> Mime-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Dear Zia, In regards to your response to my posting. "Dr Kahn suggests that merchants not be allowed to post on the ESCO site. I acknowledge Dr. Kahn's comments, but offer that greater dialog will only contribute to greater ultimate knowledge and understanding. Trying to choke off information will do everyone a disservice." I am not suggesting that the conversation should be limited to "choke off information". But for example some of my colleagues have asked for Horror stories about Invisalign, I have one. However I would never share it in this forum because I know, you (merchants)would jump in and dispute my humble clinical orthodontic opinion. I think this is a real lose for out study group who should be a place where we can feel like we can tap each other on the shoulder and say: "...yeah, yeah, I know what these product's claim is, but... what is your REAL experience with it in the clinic?" Your company has been supper nice to me, and I would not want you to think that I am tiring to discredit your product. For this reason I will keep my mouth (keyboard) shut! Date: Sat, 7 Oct 2000 23:15:36 -0700 From: Zia Chishti To: "'orthod-l@usc.edu'" Subject: Align Technology response Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" Dear fellow ESCO members, I am the Chairman and CEO of Align Technology, manufacturers of the Invisalign System. I am writing to respond to various postings over the last few days regarding our system. In ESCO #726, Dr. Lebsack cites a concern regarding the divergence of interests between venture capitalists and patients, and I thank Dr. Lebsack for bringing it forward in the thoughtful manner in which he did. This is a valid concern about business in general, not just venture capital funded businesses. Companies that are in a financially desperate situation are more likely to attempt to bend ethics as a matter of survival -- and some venture funded companies may indeed be in this group -- but it is not just venture-funded companies that find themselves in this situation. Very often, in fact, it is the publically traded companies that are forced by Wall Street to deliver ever higher revenues and profits that find themselves victim of such a financial bind. In this sense, being a privately held company has substantial advantages. The fair way to analyze the likely ethics of a business is to look at its capital resources and financial pressures, the character and credibility of the principle investors and management, and the conduct of the company in the marketplace to date. To the first point we are extraordinarily well funded having raised over $150 million to date (a staggering amount by venture standards) and with access to $10 billion in additional capital through our partners. Our investors are the bluest chip investors who have made their reputations through funding such medical companies as Genentech, GelTex, and Dura Pharmaceuticals, among many others. Other sister companies include AOL, Netscape, Compaq, Amazon.com, Excite, Intuit, and so on. What enables our investors to fund such giant successes is their impeccable reputation for ethical conduct, particularly in the medical marketplace. To the last point, I again thank Dr. Lebsack for pointing out the conservative, manner in which we are introducing the Invisalign System. We intend to be in business for a very long time and we intend to conduct ourselves in a manner consistent with such a long-term view. Dr. Lebsack also cites an article in USA today that portrays orthodontics as being in the "horse and buggy" mode. In fact, many papers carried that phrase as a direct quote from my partner, Ms. Kelsey Wirth who is the President of Align Technology. Let me state categorically that what you read is a misquote. In fact, what Kelsey was referring to was the structural difficulties of introducing a transforming change into a well established marketplace. When the motorcar was first introduced, many horse and buggy drivers criticized it for all manner of perceived imperfections: can't drive it on anything but a paved road, needs expensive gasoline rather than cheap horsefeed, breaks down all the time, requires gears, are ugly, and so on. Kelsey was referring to some of the reactions we were receiving from orthodontists who perceived us in a similar fashion. By no means did she mean to imply anything ill or dismissive regarding the current practice of orthodontics. The comment was simply misquoted out of context and we regret if there was any offense taken. Also in ESCO #726 Dr. Charlie Ruff speaks to the long-term relationship nature of the orthodontic industry, acknowledges our apparent commitment to this industry structure evident in the quality and experience of our sales force, and encourages us to continue on this path. He closes with a concern that we might "take our technology elsewhere", by which I presume he is concerned about potential dissemination to general practice dentists. I thank Dr. Ruff for his acknowledgement of our approach to date, and would like to take this opportunity to speak directly to the issue regarding the potential spread of the technology to GP dentists -- a view that we frequently hear voiced by our orthodontist partners. At Align Technology we have consciously made the choice to limit our sales practices to orthodontists for three basic reasons: (1) The intellectual complexity of treating a case with the Invisalign System is actually higher than in treating a case with traditional appliances. We believe that orthodontists have developed a superior level of insight into the progress and outcomes of treatment to be able to better use our system. (2) As with all medical systems, some degree of failure is inevitable. With the system in the hands of orthodontists, we rest comfortable that an orthodontist will be able to recognize the failure as consistent with all modes of treatment and then simply select an alternative treatment modality to fix the problem. A dentist facing failure would be much more likely to simply blame the product and consequently lower our reputation. (3) Should the orthodontic community on balance take a measured view of our system and try and use it on their patients within our currently restricted case criteria we should more than comfortably make our business projections. As the community's confidence in our system grows, our business should grow comfortably with it. At this time we cannot see any of these three factors changing. The intellectual complexity in using our system remains high, our system continues to be less than perfect, and we are substantially exceeding our business projections. Also in ESCO #726 is a posting by Dr. Ralph Perreca in which he cites a desire for longer-term follow up studies on the effectiveness of the Invisalign System, a skepticism regarding the System by potential patients, a desire for Align Technology to be forthright about our failures, and stated offense at the "horse and buggy" comment that Dr. Lesback also cited. There is no reason to believe that the long-term stability or effects of Invisalign System treatment would be any worse than those achieved with traditional braces. All our cases to date indicate roots in good condition (and in many cases arguably in better condition than with braces). As a removable device, the quality of oral hygeine and periodontal tissue is unambiguously better. Many patients and doctors are naturally somewhat skeptical about the Invisalign System. It is new, offers a remarkable shift from braces, and promises a great deal. Frequently we hear patient comments like "It can't really be invisible" or "They said that ceramic braces were invisible too" or (and this also comes from doctors) "Can it really move teeth?". Improved patient and doctor awareness is simply a matter of time and experience. In Austin and San Diego, for example, where we initially test-marketed our system over a year ago we addressed many of these concerns. Now, the majority of practioners in the Austin and San Diego area that have developed experience with Invisalign System speak confidently and directly to these questions. On the issue of failures, we are the first to admit that the Invisalign System is not perfect. There have been failures in testing and there will be failures in the field. Three points need to be made here. First, a deviation from intended treatment may simply require the retaking and resubmission of impressions to correct -- we are upfront about this in all our training. Second, every medical treatment has some degree of failure, be the modality braces, positioners, or orthognathic surgery; we are no different. That is a core reason why we orient the Invisalign System towards the specialists. Third, the cost of failure is extremely low in orthodontic treatment. It is unheard of that an appropriately monitored Invisalign System case would result in an irremediable situation for a patient. At worst, they will be no worse off than before treatment. I hope I have already adequately spoken to Dr. Perreca's comment regarding our alleged characterization of the traditional practice orthodontics as "horse and buggy" in nature. We regret that we have unintentionally caused Dr. Perreca offense on this point. Dr. Ted Rothstein writes of his experiences with the Invisalign System in ESCO #726. We thank Dr. Rothstein for his thoughful and reflective comments based on personal experience. Such anecdotes of enthusiasm for our efforts make my job worthwhile and are tremendously encouraging to the 1200 staff of Align Technology. It is instructive to note that when Dr. Rothstein calls for more information from his peers about the field clinical success of the Invisalign System he does so in a manner that is heartening and inquisitive rather than combative or cynical. Also in #726 Dr. G. Frankel writes that, despite being certified by Invisalign, he is refusing to treat patients based on the cost of the System and the possibilty of an uncertain final result. We would like to submit that the costs of the Invisalign System are far outweighed by the financial benefits to the orthodontist. Orthodontists are successfully charging their patients a small premium for treatment, generally equivalent to charges for ceramic treatment. If such fees are $5500 for an adult case and the costs of the Invisalign System for such a case are $1500, a doctor makes $4000 on a patient he or she would not otherwise treat and do so in as little as two or three hours of effort. As an example, if Dr. Frankel has received ten calls from prospective patients and had he chosen to treat them he would have earned an additional $40,000 for perhaps twenty to thirty total hours of effort. Many, many doctors are discovering the powerful economic advantages of treating patients with the Invisalign System. Clinical results using the Invisalign System have been outstanding within the case selection criteria that we are advocating. If anything, because of the benefit of our ClinCheck software, final clinical outcomes are much more predictable than with conventional treatment. Should Dr. Frankel or any of our orthodontic partners like us to do so, we would be happy to share results with them through a sales contact and help them learn to use the ClinCheck system with greater efficiency. Dr. Nordstrom writes in ESCO #726 that Align Technology's response to Dr. Schuler could have been handled privately, and that perhaps Align's failure to do so was indicative of a lack of maturity on our part or a paucity of classic business skills. Also Dr. Nordstrom's refers to me as "a young lady". I disagree with Dr. Nordstrom's views. It is the duty of a CEO to defend his company when challenged in public forum. Please see my posting to Dr. Schuler's similar comments published in ESCO #726 for my follow up on these points. Also, I regret to inform Dr. Nordstrom that there is one fewer member of the fairer sex in this world than he has assumed. The last four postings in ESCO #726 are from Dr. Roy King. Dr. King relates a case in which he achieved only 80% correction using Invisalign, comments on his displeasure at our price increase, worries at the transition of the Invisalign System to GP dentists, comments that in order to force us to lower prices orthodontists should treat fewer patients with the Invisalign System, and implies that an apology is due from me to Dr. Schuler. We thank Dr. King for sharing his clinical experience with the Invisalign System. We would suggest, however, that if Dr. King is unsatisfied with the progress of a particular case he retake and resubmit impressions and, more than likely, we will provide him with the aligners necessary for him to complete his case. Should Dr. King need further assistance, his local representative would be delighted to assist him, as would our support staff at Align Technology. On this point, we would like to reiterate that while the Invisalign System is excellent in clinical outcomes within the case selection criteria, it is not perfect. There will be failures and some cases will not complete to full expectations. This is simply the nature of clinical intervention and all experienced orthodontists will have noted this in treatment with traditional appliances. We submit that the Invisalign System should not be held to a higher standard of perfection. For my comments on our price increase, please see my posting in ESCO #723. Dr. King is mistaken in his view that reducing demand for the Invisalign System will reduce prices. In fact, quite the reverse may be true. Should unit demand reduce in the short term, we may be forced to further increase prices to offset our higher per-unit fixed costs. Thankfully, we are in a situation of intense demand for the Invisalign System. On the GP dentist issue, please note my earlier comments in this posting. On the need for an apology to Dr. Schuler, please see ESCO #726. In ESCO #727 Dr. Ron Parsons reacts to Dr King's fear that GP dentists will encroach on the practice of orthodontics with the Invisalign System. Please note my earlier comments in this posting on this point. Dr. Schuler's comments in ESCO #727 are simply not worth responding to. His most potent point is that I misspelled the word "inflammatory" in an earlier posting. In ESCO #727 Dr. Paul Thomas writes questioning the conflicts between business and healthcare in the wake of the accelerating process of health care corporatization. I have written Dr. Thomas back privately on this point and, if Dr. Thomas would like, I would be happy to share those comments on ESCO. I would like to thank Dr. Thomas for his measured views and approach to innovation. In a separate posting in #727 Dr. Thomas reiterates Dr. King's concern about GP dentists. I refer the reader back to my earlier comments in this posting on this issue. Dr. Tengku from Singapore writes asking whether the Invisalign System could not be superceded on a cost basis by cheaper treatments like spring retainers, positioners or other removable devices. Experienced practioners using removable appliances can accomplish extraordinary treatments. Indeed, in some countries removable appliances continue to be the dominant form of orthodontic treatment. However, removable devices are subject to many of the same aesthetic limitations as conventional braces -- and in some instances more so. Most adult patients, for example, could not tolerate walking around with a positioner in their mouths. Our product is designed primarily to appeal to adolescent and adult patients who desire a highly aesthetic treatment solution. For these patients, the benefits of our system are clear. While we are not currently marketing our products outside of the United States and Canada, we will be doing so in the near future. If Dr. Tengku -- or any other international practitioner -- would like, please feel free to correspond with me directly and I will ensure that they will receive first point of reference when we initiate training and sales in their domestic market. In close, this has been a somewhat lengthy posting and I appreciate the reader's interest if they have borne with it to this point. Because of the growing volume of Invisalign based postings, I will in future try to accumulate "themes" and respond to them rather than to individual postings. Best regards to the ESCO membership, Zia Chishti Chairman and CEO Align Technology, Inc. Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2000 01:07:52 -0400 From: Barry Raphael To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: Invisalign - just a thought... Message-ID: <39E152A8.A75D20FA@concentric.net> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Does anyone know an older optometrist they can talk to? With all the skirmishing about Invisalign, I wonder if it would be helpful to hear how medical professionals handled it when contact lenses were first introduced. Anybody? Barry Raphael P.S. I've started my 8th case and finished two. So far, I've had only one technical difficulty with the system: rotating a premolar. Zero compliance issues. Only good things to say about the lab. And don't worry about the GP's too much. Some will get it, most will get sick of it. It ain't as easy as it looks. If you think it is difficult making a boderline extraction decision, wait 'til you try to plan a borderline Invisalign case. You can bet they'll be asking for help on half of those cases. Date: Mon, 09 Oct 2000 08:20:27 -0400 From: Rick Walker To: ESCO Subject: more on Align Tech Message-ID: <39E1B80B.901FEF6A@thoughtslinger.com> MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit I've been following some of the Align Technologies discussion thread and I thought I'd chip in a few comments. I was in SF earlier this year at the invitation of Bob Boyd (chairman at UOP) and he showed me some of the aligner cases he has underway. He also drove me down to Align Technology's hq in silicon valley for a site visit. I politely declined to sign a non-disclosure agreement during my visit and I explicitly instructed my hosts not to share any confidential information with me, so I feel free to share my impressions. I have no financial interest in the company. My view is that Zia Chishti and Kelsey Wirth are building a company around a promising new technology. Align creates stunningly detailed 3D computer surface reconstructions from models poured from PVS impressions. The surface rendering algorithm looks a lot like the "marching cubes" algorithm which has been heavily used in 3D medical CT and MRI visualization systems. Teeth get moved around on a computer to a final occlusal relationship and aligners are fabricated to intermediate stages. Despite the hot technology - and I tend to get enamoured with tech stuff - I see some room for improvement in the system. The computer projected final occlusal result is a static estimate - last time I played with the software there was no notion of a software articulator to explore lateral and protrusive excursions and build in appropriate cuspid or group guidance. Nor could I identify anticipated occlusal contacts at treatment stages - something that shouldn't be too tough to write using "collision detection" 3D graphics methods. The full sequence of aligners is fabricated from initial models, so I can't see how the system will handle those cases where centric substantially changes after you move a few teeth and de-program the musculature. The good news is that, as with any new techology, there's always the next release. I have great respect for Zia and Kelsey and Alex Benton and the Align Technologies team - they're bright, intensely motivated and well funded. It takes a long time to fully assess whether a new orthodontic treatment modality is successful or not. If weaknesses appear, I expect AT to work hard to improve the system. I think we may be surprised at what is clinically achievable a few years from now. The system may find its place in lots of cases - maybe we'll use conventional fixed appliances to do the heavy lifting in extraction cases and finish with aligners, shortening treatment time in brackets. But Zia - John Schuler's posting in 722 wasn't inflammatory - it's exactly the kind of question I hear orthodontists asking each other all over North America. Everybody who starts an aligner case is, in effect, an investor in your young privately held company and many want to know whether or not you have the cash to get through your growth phase. I took the certification course and it seems to me AT presently recommends fairly narrow case selection criteria. I don't know how well aligners can truly align teeth in tougher cases. We'll have to wait and see if they can achieve root parallelism in extraction cases. I know Bob Boyd is really pushing the limits of the system - I think we need more of this - I encourage Align to set up a low-cost academic program for graduate orthodontic training centers around the world. I know from my early efforts writing Dentofacial Planner that one learns a great deal from independent critical scrutiny - both favourable and unfavourable. We need to see a bunch of articles in peer-reviewed journals written by independent investigators which either validate or invalidate the technique. Ultimately, the quality of clinical results will do the talking, not marketing materials. Regards, Rick Walker Date: Wed, 31 Dec 1969 22:00:00 +0000 From: Ciro Moraes Barros To: orthod-l@usc.edu Subject: orthodontist in Granada Message-ID: MIME-Version: 1.0 Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit Dear Esco friends: I have a patient of mine that is moving to Granada - Spain. Does anyone know a good orthodontist there? I would like to have two names if possible. Thank you. Deborah M. Barros - Brazil
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 729

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial October 2000, Vol. 118,
 No. 4
        by "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
  3) Re: Severely decayed first molars
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  4) Re: [ORTHOD-L digest 728]
        by teena bedi <teenabedi@usa.net>
  5) Re: ankylosed canines
        by "adrian becker" <adrianb@cc.huji.ac.il>
  6) Breakage
        by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Andr=E9_Ruest?= <aruest@compuserve.com>
  7) impacted premolar without root
        by "Marco Capozza" <m.capozza@tin.it>
  8) Invisalign
        by Vic Dietz <bdietz@bu.edu>
  9) Re: [ORTHOD-L digest 727]
        by teena bedi <teenabedi@usa.net>
 10) Invisalign concern
        by paulo18@juno.com
Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2000 01:05:49 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001014010549.007c9100@hsc.usc.edu>
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Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

36







Date: Fri, 13 Oct 2000 13:52:04 -0500
From: "Harcourt Health Sciences eTOC Service" <periodicals.web@mosby.com>
To: ajodo_toc@mosby.com
Subject: American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial October 2000, Vol. 118,
 No. 4
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American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
Table of Contents for October 2000, Vol. 118, No. 4
http://www.mosby.com/ajodo
--------------------------------------------------------------
Editorial

What patients want, and what they need
David L. Turpin, DDS, MSD
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a111256

Original Articles

Longitudinal assessment of vertical and sagittal control in the
mandibular arch by the mandibular fixed lingual arch
Francisco J. Villalobos, DDS, MS, Pramod K. Sinha, DDS, MS, Ram S.
Nanda, DDS, MS, PhD
Oklahoma City, Okla
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109626

Ratings of profile attractiveness after functional appliance
treatment
Kieran O'Neill, MDS, Michael Harkness, BDS, MSc, PhD, DOrth, FRACDS,
Robert Knight, MA, PhD, DipClinPsych, FNZPsS
Dunedin, New Zealand
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109492

Commentary
Donald B. Giddon, DMD, PhD
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1180377

Cephalometric appraisal of posttreatment vertical changes in adult
orthodontic patients
Joong-Gyu Ahn, DDS, PhD, Bernard J. Schneider, DDS, MS
Seoul, Korea, and Chicago, Ill
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109312

Oral perception in tongue thrust and other oral habits
José S. Dahan, LDS, MD, PhD, Odette Lelong, BA, LRL, PhD, Sandrine
Celant, BA, Valérie Leysen, BA
Brussels, Belgium
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109101

Effects of Twin-block therapy on protrusive muscle functions
Kanoknart Chintakanon, DDS, MDS (Ortho), PhD, Kemal S. Türker, BDS, PhD,
Wayne Sampson, BDS, BScDent (Hons), MDS, Tom Wilkinson, MDS, MSc, Grant
Townsend, BDS, BScDent (Hons), PhD, DDSc
Adelaide, Australia
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109493

Stability of bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy: Rigid fixation
versus transosseous wiring
Jeffrey L. Berger, BDS, DipOrtho, Valmy Pangrazio-Kulbersh, DDS, MS,
Sven N. Bacchus, DDS, MS, Richard Kaczynski, PhD
Detroit, Mich
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108781

Treatment and posttreatment craniofacial changes after rapid maxillary
expansion and facemask therapy
Tiziano Baccetti, DDS, PhD, Lorenzo Franchi, DDS, PhD, James A.
McNamara, Jr, DDS, PhD
Florence, Italy, and Ann Arbor, Mich
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109840

Evaluation of treatment and posttreatment changes of protraction
facemask treatment using the PAR index
Peter Ngan, DMD, Cynthia Yiu, BDS, MDS
Morgantown, WV, and Hong Kong
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108253

The relationship of 2 professional occlusal indexes with
patients' perceptions of aesthetics, function, speech, and orthodontic
treatment need
Matthew Shue-Te Yeh, BSc (Hons), BDS, Amir-Reza Koochek, BSc (Hons),
BDS, Vicki Vlaskalic, BDSc, MDSc, Robert Boyd, DDS, MEd, Stephen
Richmond, BDS, MScD, PhD, FDS, RCS (Ed), FDS, RCS (Eng), DOrth
Bedford and Cardiff, UK, and San Francisco,
Calif
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a107008

Location of the apex of the lower central incisor
Arthur E. Phelps, DDS, Nawaf Masri, DDS
Cleveland, Ohio
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109625

Radiographic localization of unerupted mandibular anterior
teeth
Stanley G. Jacobs, BDSc (Melb), FDSRCS (Eng), DOrthRCS (Eng)
Melbourne, Australia
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108783

Radiographic localization of unerupted teeth: Further findings about
the vertical tube shift method and other localization techniques
Stanley G. Jacobs, BDSc (Melb), FDSRCS (Eng), DOrthRCS (Eng)
Melbourne, Australia
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a108782

The Royal London Space Planning: An integration of space analysis and
treatment planning. Part I: Assessing the space required to meet
treatment
objectives
Robert H. Kirschen, BDS, FDSRCS, MSc, MOrthRCS, Elizabeth A. O'Higgins,
BDS, FDSRCS, MSc, MOrthRCS, Robert T. Lee, BDS, FDSRCS, MOrthRCS
London, UK
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109031

The Royal London Space Planning: An integration of space analysis and
treatment planning. Part II: The effect of other treatment procedures on

space
Robert H. Kirschen, BDS, FDSRCS, MSc, MOrthRCS, Elizabeth A. O'Higgins,
BDS, FDSRCS, MSc, MOrthRCS, Robert T. Lee, BDS, FDSRCS, MOrthRCS
London, UK
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a109032

CDABO Case Report

Asymmetric extraction treatment of a Class II Division 2 subdivision
left malocclusion with anterior and posterior crossbites
Andrew Shelley, DDS, MS, William Beam, DDS, John Mergen, DDS, MS,
Clayton T. Parks, DDS, John Casko, DDS, MS, PhD
Iowa City, Iowa
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a104096

Continuing Education

Questions and registration forms
Zane Muhl, DDS, MS, PhD, Editor
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1180467

Ortho Bytes

Digital image processing: How to retouch your clinical
photographs
Demetrios J. Halazonetis, DMD, MS, Martin N. Abelson, AB, DDS, ABO
Athens, Greece
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a111244

Litigation, Legislation, and Ethics

Informed consent and the fourth dimension
Laurance Jerrold, DDS, JD
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a110888

Department of Reviews and Abstracts

In vivo orthodontic bond strength: Comparison with in vitro
results
Kevin L. Pickett
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184bra

Behandlungsplanung und Biomechanik der Distraktionsosteogenese aus
kieferorthopidischer Sicht
Barry H. Grayson, Pedro E. Santiago
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184brb

News, Comments, and Service Announcements

News of dentistry and orthodontics
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a110634

Directory: AAO Officers and Organizations

The American Association of Orthodontists, it constituent societies,
the American Board of Orthodontists, the American Association of
Orthodontists Foundation Board of Directors, and the college of
Diplomates of
the American Board of Orthodontics
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184da

Readers' Forum

Direction of growth
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a110635a

Hats off to supporters of AAO Foundation
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=a110635b

Readers' Services

Editorial board
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184eb

Information for readers
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Information for authors
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184ia

Classified ad section

Bound volumes available to subscribers
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184bv

Availability of journal back issues
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184jb

AAO Meeting calendar
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=aod1180438

Contributors wanted!
http://www.mosby.com/scripts/om.dll/serve?article=jod001184co

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Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2000 07:07:11 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Alan Bobkin" <abobkin@wwonline.com>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Severely decayed first molars
Message-ID: <048c01c032aa$3d370920$2ef9a218@paultower>
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Alan,

I personally would not want a lifetime of dealing with molars with RCT,
build-ups and crowns.  This is a potential situation for use of implantable
devices to protract the second molars or possibly even conventional implants
to replace the "bombed out" molars.  We have used modified titanium screws
in a dog model to successfully move teeth.  The screws were placed,
immediated loaded and were intact for 6-8 months of tooth movement.  The
bone/titanium interface looked much like an implant/bone interface on the
histology.  Based on the results, we are starting some limited clinical
treatment.

Even if you chose to suggest conventional implants, the cost/risk versus
benefit would be favorable.  I'm not sure about the fees in Tornoto, but in
our locale, the cost of salvaging the molars you've described would closely
approach that of a restored single tooth fixture.  In dental school, we have
been taught to conserve natural teeth whenever possible.  I'm not so sure it
isn't time to re-think that paradigm (if you will excuse the use of that
over-used word)

Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Orthodontics and Oral and
Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Chapel Hill, NC
----- Original Message -----
From: "Alan Bobkin" <abobkin@wwonline.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Saturday, October 07, 2000 10:50 AM
Subject: Severely decayed first molars


> I would appreciate some opinions regarding a case.  A nine year old girl
was
> referred to me for my opinion.  She has a Class I occlusion.  Her 6's and
> upper  and lower incisors are erupted.  There is mild crowding of the
upper
> and lower anteriors but this is probably not an extraction case.  Her 16,
> 26, and 36 are severely decayed to the point that over half the crowns are
> missing (what we would have called bombed out).  Who would extract the
three
> molars?  Who would opt for RCT, posts and crowns? Why?
>
> Alan Bobkin
> Toronto, Ontario
>
>

Date: 12 Oct 00 11:57:08 MDT
From: teena bedi <teenabedi@usa.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: [ORTHOD-L digest 728]
Message-ID: <20001012175708.22566.qmail@nwcst313.netaddress.usa.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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 Dear Alan Bobkin hi I have recently tretaed 2 similar cases with decayed
molars. In one of them I decided to extract the molars. Pt was 10 yrs old and
the second mlars moved well in to the extraction sites. I was quite happy with
the occlusion as well . But in the second case where the age of the pt was ok
she was about 11 yrs old the second mlars moved in but were mesially tilted
and didnt correct even after ortho treatment. But I do think that if there are
very badly decayed molars it makes sense to save the patient the headache of
trying to save them if anyway extractions are reqd for ortho treatment.You see
if you have saved them with RCT and post and core and eventually have to
extract the after all the effort coz of failure RCT then its not worth the
effort.                      sorthod-l@usc.edu wrote:

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 728

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Severely decayed first molars
        by Alan Bobkin <abobkin@wwonline.com>
  3) Re: Incisor apices
        by YURFEST@aol.com
  4) incisor apices
        by elie amm <elieamm@doctor.com>
  5) Re: ankylosed canines
        by MDLoffice <mdlively@adelphia.net>
  6) Re: ankylosed canines
        by "Jeff Genecov" <c0018593@airmail.net>
  7) impacted canine of Ruff
        by ray.siat@xtra.co.nz
  8) Re: ankylosed canine
        by "B. Cohanim" <bcohanim@u.washington.edu>
  9) Re: ankylosed canines
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 10) Anklosed Cainine
        by JMer1997@aol.com
 11) Re: ankylosed canines
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
 12) Charlie's Impacted Cuspid, i.e., his Patient's
        by "Mort & Gayle Speck" <morton_speck@hms.harvard.edu>
 13) ankylosed canines
        by Carlos Crignola Riccardi <cacrigno@rdc.cl>
 14) Re: Invisalign
        by DraKahn@aol.com
 15) Align Technology response
        by Zia Chishti <zia@aligntech.com>
 16) Invisalign - just a thought...
        by Barry Raphael <Baronlin@concentric.net>
 17) more on Align Tech
        by Rick Walker <rick@thoughtslinger.com>
 18) orthodontist in Granada
        by Ciro Moraes Barros <cmbarros@laser.com.br>

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____________________________________________________________________
Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1
Date: Tue, 10 Oct 2000 21:55:03 +0200
From: "adrian becker" <adrianb@cc.huji.ac.il>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: ankylosed canines
Message-ID: <00aa01c032f3$fc268b00$5f0c4084@adrianb>
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I have spent the last several weeks literally deleting almost every posting
before reading them - the whole discussion of Invisalign has left me
thoroughly bored and ready to quit the ESCO.
At last Charlie Ruff's letter and something of consequence to think about
and to discuss on the net - a breath of fresh air!

Several people made what I would consider really thoughtful and valid
comments - not to mention my heartfelt thanks to Jeff Genecov and Bobby
Cohanim for giving my book a "plug"! Perhaps the gang will permit me to put
in my own pennyworth, based on the suggestions several of you have already
made.

1. Be sure whether or not there is ankylosis! Occasionally, a maxillary
canine tooth
is impacted in the line of the arch and not obviously palatally displaced.
It is not parallel to the adjacent tooth and its crown appears to be jammed
against the distal side of the lateral incisor and, unless traction is
applied in the correct direction, the tooth will not move and the
orthodontists may err in diagnosing ankylosis.  This is generally true in
regard to any tooth whose EXACT position and orientation has not been
accurately determined and whose 3-D relationships with adjacent structures
has not been fully pictured in the mind of the operator.

2. Lateral cervical resorption of the root of a partially-erupted or
unerupted tooth is an unusual but reported phenomenon. A case is described
in my
book on pages 172-176 (fig.7.17 a-l). This is not an ankylosis, but rather a
soft-tissue replacing resorption, which neutralizes the eruptive power of
the tooth, presumably due to a loss of integrity of the PDL. These lesions
can usually be seen on a good periapical view. Treatment involves opening a
flap and determining the full extent of the lesion, curettage of the
invasive soft tissue and replacing the lost hard tissue with a restoration.
This may involve a root canal treatment either because the lesion has
extended that deep or because additional mechanical retention is needed for
the restoration. My experience of "ankylosed" unerupted teeth is that a good
 number come under this category and are not true (i.e. bony) ankyloses.

3. So, you have confirmed that these are not the cause and you are sure it
is ankylosed. In regard to the procedure to "shake", "shockel", "free" or
other circumlocution (always referred to as "gentle") that may be used to
suggest an empirically-determined breaking of a small ankylotic
connection, to achieve a degree of movement similar to, or slightly in
excess of, that of a normally erupted tooth. I would suggest the following:-
firstly, be sure that you have a full and heavy archwire that fills all the
brackets and spreads the load to all other teeth in that jaw. When the
surgeon has completed his (relatively simple) task, apply heavyish pressure
to the tooth with a good elastic tie. Understand that this type of ankylosis
recurs with amazing speed, once the pressure lets up and bony healing
occurs. So you have to keep up the level of force by changing the elastic
tie every few DAYS. This way, the tooth moves before bone reforms across
the previously ankylotic site. Essentially this is distraction osteogenesis
on
a microscopic level. I will even call the patient (something I will almost
never
otherwise do) if he/she forgets an appointment, in order to maintain the
momentum and give the tooth the best chance of success - if you don't see
the patient for a month or so, you will have failed again for sure.

Regarding Bobby Cohanim's patient who had lost maxillary left incisors as
the result of trauma and the canine of the same side had become ankylosed
and relatively intruded. Block osteotomy and extrusive orthodontic force
appear to be the direction to go. However, we must recognize that the
desired treatment procedure is a distraction osteogenesis of some degree and
not orthodontics. The forces must therefore be applied and maintained to a
relatively high extrusive force level. This mean having an efficient
mechanism, resting on a wide anchor base, with a good range of applied
force and that the forces be renewed every few days. Cancel all vacations
and make sure the patient comes in as needed - but you may still fail if one
or more of the above conditions is not met. So communicate with your patient
and explain the urgency to him/her.

Paul M. Thomas has blamed the resistant canine in the adult as the cause of
a result that shows "external resorption after a period of time".  Mort
Speck
makes the same observation. I would like to suggest that the external
resorption pre-dated and was the etiology of the resistant canine and not
its
cause. However, I accept that it may be difficult to diagnose on a p.a. of
an
unerupted tooth - it looks like a normal cervical radiographic "shadow" in
the early stages.

John McDonald touches on several of these aspects, in the name of mentor
Robert Vanarsdall - i.e. reapplying traction every day or two, seeing root
resorption near the neck of the tooth. He brings in another very relevant
point and that is the penchant of the over-zealous surgeon to expose widely
and to nick the PDL on an exposed root surface (wasn't that how Peter
Shapiro of U. Washington deliberately caused his reimplanted deciduous
canines to ankylose so that he could exploit their subsequent absolute
anchorage potential?) and the possibility of spill of etchant on that root
surface.

None of these need happen if the orthodontist is present to restrain the
Oral Surgeon from being over-helpful! How can an orthodontist accept
responsibility for a result if he/she is not present when a well-meaning
oral surgeon, while providing access to the tooth, also engages in other
"helpful" practices? See pages 35 - 40 in my book for a fuller description
of the many possible pitfalls - each of which can lead to the pessimistic
50-50 failure rate that Paul M. Thomas has suggested.

One final point relates not to orthodontics but to oral rehabilitation. When
a normal canine erupts into its place in the arch, it brings with it a large
amount of alveolar bone which gives the dental arch its characteristic form
in that area. If a palatal canine is extracted without an attempt to bring
it into the arch, this alveolar bone does not develop and the immediate
edentulous area of the ridge is thin, lacking its eminence. Placing an
implant in this area is difficult  because of the relative lack of bone and,
even when successful, the final artificial crown must be placed with a
strong buccal tilt or else it will be in crossbite. This is neither
functional,
esthetic nor is it likely to have a good prognosis.

Adrian Becker.




Date: Fri, 13 Oct 2000 15:23:40 -0400
From: André Ruest <aruest@compuserve.com>
To: <ORTHOD-L@usc.edu>
Subject: Breakage
Message-ID: <002c01c0354b$195b3140$0a8021a1@portatifdell>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0029_01C03529.90E175C0"

Dear group:
 
I have encountered a patient who has systematically broken a 16 X 22 SS wire between the upper two centrals.
 
Here is the setup:
Mixed dentition, Pendex appliance with bands on the 6's, TMA springs removed (Molar distalization is finished), SPEED .018 slot brackets on 11(upper right central), 21(upper left central), 22(upper left lateral). 16 X 22 SS wire from 16 to 11, 21, 22, 26 with open coil spring between 16 and 11. This setup is to open space for right upper lateral which erupted in rotation. I am not worried about the centrals flaring because the boy needs a bit of overjet. Mother is adamant about the fact that he does not do anything that would break the wire. according to her, I am responsible (implying I am using inferior quality materials), etc, etc, etc...
 
My question is: How is it possible to break such a wire very cleanly just mesial to the #21 bracket? His teeth are not even in occlusion. I've only been in practice 16 years, but i'm not so new at this. Maybe its the City of Montreal water that corrodes the wires... How do patients really break those wires without having access to pliers?
 
Dr André Ruest
Date: Wed, 11 Oct 2000 11:26:57 +0200
From: "Marco Capozza" <m.capozza@tin.it>
To: "Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: impacted premolar without root
Message-ID: <003501c03365$84637d40$d1f92dd5@vucppqlj>
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Dear ESCO
a 9 years old male came to my observation with a I Class malocclusion. It
was planned a fixed orthodontic treatment but I warned his parents that
there was a second upper premolar (15) that was late with root formation if
compared with age and with the other teeth (25) and that it could be
impacted even at the end of
orthodontic treatment. Two years later I am going to end treatment, root is
not formed
and it is deeply impacted. and its space is open.
Would you extract it and replace with implant or wait more for root
formation?
Thank you
Marco

Dr. Marco Capozza
Lecce - Italy



Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2000 11:06:35 -0400
From: Vic Dietz <bdietz@bu.edu>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <3.0.3.32.20001012110635.008fd910@acs-mail.bu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

I just heard something very interesting. At the recent perio meeting in
Hawaii Invisalign had the largest booth at the exhibits. Can it be that
this was simply to let our colleagues know that this is available through
their local orthodontist?

Vic Dietz
Date: 12 Oct 00 11:44:04 MDT
From: teena bedi <teenabedi@usa.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: [ORTHOD-L digest 727]
Message-ID: <20001012174404.3306.qmail@nwcst267.netaddress.usa.net>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII
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 All the information on INVISALIGN seems to point to non extraction treatment
hardly anything can be done for skeletal problems and for cases involving
maximum or moderate anchorage! Why are all orthodontists so panicky? No one
can replace good knowledge of orthodontics!!Let us see the results and then
comment please! And if it does help in some cases general dentists are more
than welcome to try it! At least then we can work on the really challenging
cases!                        orthod-l@usc.edu wrote:

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 727

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Missing Indiana Teen
        by Kevin Jarrell <kjarrell@sprynet.com>
  3) Re: Invisalign
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  4) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 726
        by "John L. Schuler D.D.S., M.S." <jlschuler@sprynet.com>
  5) Re: Align Technology Response To Posts in Digest 725
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  6) Re: Invisalgn results
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  7) Invisalign
        by "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
  8) Re: Invisalign
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  9) ankylosed canines
        by Orthodmd@aol.com

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____________________________________________________________________
Get free email and a permanent address at http://www.netaddress.com/?N=1
Date: Thu, 12 Oct 2000 23:39:15 -0400
From: paulo18@juno.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisalign concern
Message-ID: <20001012.233917.-250587.0.paulo18@juno.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain
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I have recently submitted my first invisalign case and was completely
unbiased regarding the company's positions or the systems success rate.
I'm sure that Align technology wishes to work with orthodontists to
better establish themselves in the marketplace and therefore grow as a
company. I am also sure that the system will work assuming the correct
candidate is selected.  However, I have recently noticed a disturbing
trend.  Over the past 2 weeks many of my younger patients have been
asking for the "invisible braces they have seen on TV". Playing the role
of the knowledgeable orthodontist, I inform them that the invisalign
system is for adults or patients with all of their permanent teeth.
Explaining to patients that adolescents are unable to receive this
treatment is not what concerns me; what concerns me is their dismay of
how they now need to wear those "ugly braces".  Let me assure you that
"ugly" is not my word but the word of a recently growing number of
patients.  The first time I heard this I assumed that the patient (like
some patients) was just unhappy with the whole proposition of orthodontic
treatment.  However, after speaking to these unhappy children, I am now
convinced at what is occurring.  Kids watching these TV commercials see
the ugly guy who doesn't get the date and the jealous sister who has the
"ugly braces" and kids don't want to be these people.  Let's not get into
a debate on how much TV influences children, I am just telling you what
some of my patients have told me.  We as an orthodontic community have
done so much to change kids perspectives from the "ugly metal mouth" to
the "cool colored braces" that I fear these advertisements are quickly
destroying a decades worth of work.  I enjoy the new breed of patient who
is excited to get braces and do not want to go back to the old patients
who dread braces due to there perceptions of how ugly they look.  Align
technology has effectively marketed there product and I applaud them for
making the masses aware of orthodontic treatment.  However, the manner in
which they compare traditional appliances to there product compromises
peoples views about braces and brings back that "ugly metal mouth" stigma
that we have fought so hard to destroy.  It is naive of me to think that
these commercials will stop airing because lets face it, they are
powerful marketing tools for Align technology.  I hope however, that the
next series of commercials will not have such a negative view towards
traditional appliances.  Orthodontists need braces and Align technology
needs orthodontists.  Lets see if we can work together on advertising
that suits both our needs.

Paulo Nogueira
________________________________________________________________
YOU'RE PAYING TOO MUCH FOR THE INTERNET!
Juno now offers FREE Internet Access!
Try it today - there's no risk!  For your FREE software, visit:
http://dl.www.juno.com/get/tagj.
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 730

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Tip Edge Course
        by "Morris and Pauline Rapaport" <mrapapor@mail.usyd.edu.au>
  3) Craniofacial Distraction Osteogenesis
        by Janea Woosley <JWoosley@tambcd.edu>
  4) Re: Breakage
        by MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
  5) Re: Breakage
        by "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
  6) Re:Severely decayed first molars
        by "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>
  7) premolar
        by "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
  8) Conradie syndrome
        by "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
  9) alternative to extraction
        by "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>
 10) Re: impacted premolar without root
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
 11) En: bombed out molars
        by "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
 12) X-Ray scanner
        by "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
 13) Re: impacted premolar without root
        by MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
 14) Re: impacted premolar without root
        by "adrian becker" <adrianb@cc.huji.ac.il>
 15) Invisalign Advertising
        by DRGSCOTT@aol.com
Date: Tue, 17 Oct 2000 14:09:54 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001017140954.007bea40@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

37






Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 04:27:43 +1000
From: "Morris and Pauline Rapaport" <mrapapor@mail.usyd.edu.au>
To: "ORTHO list ESCO" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Cc: "Colin Twelftree" <twelftre@senet.com.au>
Subject: Tip Edge Course
Message-ID: <010f01c0360c$72a99e00$0b11000a@ucc.su.OZ.AU>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_010C_01C03660.43492000"

Dear Colleagues,
 
In Case you didn't notice it in the general announcement, there will be a two day Tip Edge Course on 5th & 6th November preceding the main Australian Begg Orthodontic Society / Khon Kaen University conference. The cost is $US250. For those wishing to enrol or for further information please contact Dr Colin Twelftree <twelftre@senet.com.au>
 
 
INVITATION
 
The Australian Begg Orthodontic Society (ABOS) in Conjunction with Khon Kaen University (KKU) in north east Thailand are holding the annual ABOS meeting at the Sofitel Hotel and on the University campus in Khon Kaen in early November 2000. All orthodontists and their partners are invited to attend. As well as an exciting scientific program, there will be organised sight-seeing tours of the countryside and the famous silk producing region.
 
All orthodontists, regardless of the technique they use are welcome and you will be pleasantly surprised to see how diversified and relevant the program is. For instance, Professor John Gibbons from the Department of Pathology at the University of Sydney and former visiting Professor at U. of Colorado and Harvard, is giving two lectures on Recent Molecular Biological insights in Facio-Maxillary Development. Professor Sarinnaphakom from the Prosthetic Department of KKU will be giving one of the two lectures on occlusion; "Occlusal principles for orthodontic therapy"; another lecture is entitled "Bite Force and its Meaning". The full scientific program is on our web site.
 
The registration fees have been deliberately kept incredibly low and even postgraduate students will find they can afford to attend. This is despite the conference being held in a five star luxurious hotel. It is better still if you are exchanging American dollars or Euros. We have been assisted by the generosity of the 3M Unitek Company who helped print and distribute the registration booklets. Khon Kaen is not on the usual tourist trail so you can experience the untouched culture of this Isaan Region and visit temples, bronze and iron age pre-historic archaeological sites.
 
There are regular flights from Bangkok to Khon Kaen and these take about one hour. The full social and scientific program runs from Monday 6th to Friday 10th November 2000.  There is a pre conference Tip Edge Course
 
Registration forms can be printed off the web site. www.myorthodontist.net/begg 
Our appointed travel agent for flights and accommodation information is Ms Vicky Gilden of Jetset Tours E-Mail sales@jetsetrosebay.com.au
Further information can also be obtained by contacting the President ABOS Dr Morris Rapaport  E-Mail braces@orthodontist.net
 
             / --- \                                   \___/
Morris     o-o                    & Pauline     *  *     RAPAPORT
                +                                        +
              \_/                                       \_/
 
ICQ: 6353626
_____________________________________________
                       mrapapor@mail.usyd.edu.au   or  braces@orthodontist.net
Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 16:37:00 -0500
From: Janea Woosley <JWoosley@tambcd.edu>
To: "'ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU'" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: Craniofacial Distraction Osteogenesis
Message-ID: <135FBA7C723DD3119BF900805FBB7816C9305A@exchange.tambcd.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"

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>
> Craniofacial Distraction Osteogenesis:
> Current Techniques and Future Directions
>
> Presented by: Baylor College of Dentistry, TAMUS HSC,
> Office of Continuing Education, Dallas, Texas
> Course Location: Wyndham Garden Hotel, Dallas, Texas
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> notebook)
>
> Credit:  21.5 hours lecture/participation
>
> (Co-sponsored by Commercial Organizations)
>
>
>
Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2000 09:33:10 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Breakage
Message-ID: <39E86096.C404EA41@adelphia.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=iso-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

Dear André:

1) Defective wire
2) Outside influences such as forks, pens, etc.
3) Some things you do not want to know

Mark

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 19:36:38 +0800
From: "Tengku Sinannaga and Peh Ling Ling" <tbspll88@singnet.com.sg>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Breakage
Message-ID: <003801c0369c$2f601d00$92d115a5@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0035_01C036DF.3CB25160"

Dear Andre;
Had the same experience to one of my patient and after thorough interrogation, the culprit seem to be the nail-clipper (a big one though) which the patient managed to insert into the mouth and use all his force to clip off the wires and pulled the pieces out.  Can't do anything about it unless he is banned from possessing any nail clippers.  Lots of brain washing needed for the patient to reduce further breakages.
 
Just a thought of may be converting the speed brackets at the anterior teeth with the old type of A-company straight wire brackets (quite a broad one) to reduce interbracket width which could increase the "stiffness" and make it more difficult for the patient to manipulate any clipping instrument successfully.
 
Tengku
Singapore
Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 15:45:38 +0800
From: "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>
To: "study club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re:Severely decayed first molars
Message-ID: <005801c0367b$ef248840$210d16ac@TOMI1.GRMC.GOV.CN>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="gb2312"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Alan,

If the embryo of her 8 is still there with normal size and position, the
three molars should be extracted.

Good Luck

Silvia Zhou


Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 11:34:39 -0200
From: "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Cc: <m.capozza@tin.it>
Subject: premolar
Message-ID: <003f01c036ac$af6cecc0$96e8fea9@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_003C_01C0369B.E79B0160"

Marco
 
I would check rx, if the teeth is in the same position for 2 years , maybe its ankylosed,  but even though I would try, having the gingiva cut , like, make a window, and wait a little. I don't know if I would bracket and try to pull it, only looking at the rx would make me decide.  If you decide to pull don't use continuous arch.
Priscila
Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 14:45:14 +0200
From: "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
To: "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Conradie syndrome
Message-ID: <000c01c036a5$c3fcc400$0e07a8c0@icon.co.za>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0009_01C036B6.86E6E300"

Does anybody have information regarding a Conradie syndrome?
 
Thanks in advance
 
Chris Greeff
Centurion
South Africa
chris@icon.co.za
Date: Mon, 16 Oct 2000 08:57:23 +0800
From: "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>
To: "study club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: alternative to extraction
Message-ID: <000101c0370c$14994c60$210d16ac@TOMI1.GRMC.GOV.CN>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="gb2312"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear group,

I'd like to hear your opinions regarding a case.  A nine year old girl has a
Class I occlusion with her upper and lower incisors erupted except for the
left-central one. It is still impacted in the maxillary. As shown in the
X-ray, the embryo of her 21 has twisted by 180 degree, i.e. the crown is
upward while the root downward. Are there any alternatives to extraction?
Why? I'd appreaciate your effort in addressing my case.

Silvia Zhou
Guangzhou, PR China

Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2000 23:36:43 -0400
From: Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: impacted premolar without root
Message-ID: <39E9264A.BFF24C66@utoronto.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

It appears from your message that the patient is now 11 years old. If there is
more root development now than 2 years ago I would deband (if you are finished)
and hold the space with a retainer. Take annual (or semi-annual) x-rays and
reasses for extraction if the tooth hasn't erupted by the age of 14 or so. TGS.

Marco Capozza wrote:

> Dear ESCO
> a 9 years old male came to my observation with a I Class malocclusion. It
> was planned a fixed orthodontic treatment but I warned his parents that
> there was a second upper premolar (15) that was late with root formation if
> compared with age and with the other teeth (25) and that it could be
> impacted even at the end of
> orthodontic treatment. Two years later I am going to end treatment, root is
> not formed
> and it is deeply impacted. and its space is open.
> Would you extract it and replace with implant or wait more for root
> formation?
> Thank you
> Marco
>
> Dr. Marco Capozza
> Lecce - Italy

Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 12:12:58 -0200
From: "Rachel Ribeiro" <rachel@nitnet.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Cc: <abobkin@wwwonline.com>
Subject: En: bombed out molars
Message-ID: <00cc01c036b2$08c3c460$96e8fea9@nitnet.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_00C9_01C036A1.41FCE060"

 
----- Original Message -----
From: Rachel Ribeiro
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Cc: abobkin@wwwonline.com
Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2000 12:11 PM
Subject: bombed out molars

Alan
 
I would extract.  The kid is going to drag 3 bombed out molaars for the rest of life.
I had a case but the girl was older, the 7 wasn't erupted and 36 and 46 were needing endodontics and whole crowns,  I opted for extraction and 7's came in nicely, thank God.
You have a more difficult case, because you have a young kid and 3 bombed out molars,  even then I would extract.
Priscila
Date: Sun, 15 Oct 2000 14:47:17 +0200
From: "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
To: "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: X-Ray scanner
Message-ID: <001501c036a6$0db65ca0$0e07a8c0@icon.co.za>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0012_01C036B6.D0A81CC0"

Can anybody recommend a good quality easy to use scanner?
 
Must be able to scan Pans and Cephs at a reasonable speed
 
Thanks in advance
 
 
Chris Greeff
Centurion
South Africa
chris@icon.co.za
Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2000 09:29:35 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: impacted premolar without root
Message-ID: <39E85FBF.7A703154@adelphia.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Marco:

If this patient is only 11 years old at this time and you have opened
space for this tooth, they have nothing to lose by your fabricating a
fixed retainer to maintain the space.  The implant cannot be placed
until he is around 16-18 years of age.  Realistically, this patient will
not wear his removable retainer faithfully for the next 6 years before
being ready for an implant.

If the tooth does develop and ends up needing some guidance you can go
back in with partial treatment.   The tooth should be followed every
12-18 months to make sure that there is no problem developing.  If it
turns out that the tooth requires extraction and implant placement then
this can always be done down the road.

Hope this helps.  I am assuming that this patient is only 11 years old
since you made reference to starting at 9 and going through two years of
treatment.

Mark

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2000 19:04:31 +0200
From: "adrian becker" <adrianb@cc.huji.ac.il>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: impacted premolar without root
Message-ID: <000d01c03600$d29edb60$160d4084@adrianb>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Marco Capozza,
The patient is 9 years old. Is it imperative to treat now? Can you not wait
till age 13 or 14 and reassess the whole problem, with a much more mature
premolar (and patient!). The boy presumably has many unerupted teeth and,
who knows, maybe something else will impact.
If you have to treat now (although I cannot imagine why, but you are the
best judge of that), why not complete your ortho treatment for everything
except the maxillary second premolar and then retain in the usual way, but
add a special individual bonded space retainer for the unerupted premolar.
Obviously you cannot treat the premolar now and neither would you want to
replace it with anything that may have a poorer prognosis. So, you wait 3,
4, 5 or more years until the premolar has a half to 2/3 root length. It may
erupt, but it may impact - you cannot predict that now.
There is no evidence to support early treatment improving its prognosis. So
why make a 2-phase treatment unnecessarily?
Adrian Becker

----- Original Message -----
From: Marco Capozza <m.capozza@tin.it>
To: Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Wednesday, October 11, 2000 11:26 AM
Subject: impacted premolar without root


> Dear ESCO
> a 9 years old male came to my observation with a I Class malocclusion. It
> was planned a fixed orthodontic treatment but I warned his parents that
> there was a second upper premolar (15) that was late with root formation
if
> compared with age and with the other teeth (25) and that it could be
> impacted even at the end of
> orthodontic treatment. Two years later I am going to end treatment, root
is
> not formed
> and it is deeply impacted. and its space is open.
> Would you extract it and replace with implant or wait more for root
> formation?
> Thank you
> Marco
>
> Dr. Marco Capozza
> Lecce - Italy
>
>
>
>

Date: Sat, 14 Oct 2000 19:23:53 EDT
From: DRGSCOTT@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisalign Advertising
Message-ID: <2b.bf41b77.271a4509@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Like Paulo, I have also been concerned about the negative message that the
Invisalign ads are sending.  I'm sure they did not intend to do damage to the
image of braces, but that is exactly what the ads are doing.  Invisalign has
great potential, but obviously can't be the right treatment for all patients.
 Hopefully Zia Chishti, CEO of Invisalign, will correct this error as soon as
possible.

Dr. Gregory Scott
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 731

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Re: impacted premolar without root
        by Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
  3) Re: X-Ray scanner
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  4) RE: X-Ray scanner
        by "Demetrios Halazonetis" <dhal@dhal.com>
  5) Invisalign Advertising
        by rperrec@attglobal.net
  6) Patient Quality
        by "Paul D. Zuelke" <zuelke@email.msn.com>
Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2000 12:44:21 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001020124421.00793630@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

38






Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 13:04:15 +1000
From: Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: impacted premolar without root
Message-ID: <4.3.1.2.20001018114842.00de6d50@pop.netspace.net.au>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="=====================_15381050==_.ALT"

Hi,

I agree with Ted Schipper.

An interesting paper on this appeared in Aust. Orthod. J.  Oct 89, titled "Hypodontia in the permanent dentition" by Nik-Hussein. She discusses the term hypodontia in preference to partial anodontia, oligodontia, aplasia, etc.

A relevant feature to Marco's case is in the last two sentences of her abstract, namely, " It is noteworthy that studies showing the lower second premolars to be most commonly missing, have younger subjects. This suggests delayed development of these teeth in some individuals." As editor at the time, I thought her insight into this so important that I elected to italicize the words therein as a warning to we clinicians to be on guard. 

As usual, when one becomes aware of things (Goethe: "We only see what we know" ) they are seen to varying degrees thereafter.


Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 06:18:55 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>, "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: X-Ray scanner
Message-ID: <004401c038ec$d21c9620$43111918@paultower>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0041_01C038CB.4AF59960"

The Epson Expression 1600 seems to be what some of the digital gurus are suggesting.
 
Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Orthodontics and Oral and
Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Chapel Hill, NC
----- Original Message -----
From: Chris Greeff
To: ESCO
Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2000 8:47 AM
Subject: X-Ray scanner

Can anybody recommend a good quality easy to use scanner?
 
Must be able to scan Pans and Cephs at a reasonable speed
 
Thanks in advance
 
 
Chris Greeff
Centurion
South Africa
chris@icon.co.za
Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 21:16:22 +0300
From: "Demetrios Halazonetis" <dhal@dhal.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: X-Ray scanner
Message-ID: <MABBINHEOCOHLFBFCDMGIEMCCBAA.dhal@dhal.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

A good scanner is the Epson Expression 1600 Pro. It comes with a
transparency adapter and can scan cephs and pans, as well as slides.

Demetrios Halazonetis
Kifissia, Greece
dhal@dhal.com

Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 20:38:50 -0400
From: rperrec@attglobal.net
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisalign Advertising
Message-ID: <39EE4294.6D992FD4@attglobal.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Subject:
        Invisalign Advertising
   Date:
        Sat, 14 Oct 2000 19:23:53 EDT
   From:
        DRGSCOTT@aol.com
     To:
        orthod-l@usc.edu



Like Paulo, I have also been concerned about the negative message that
the
Invisalign ads are sending.  I'm sure they did not intend to do damage
to the
image of braces, but that is exactly what the ads are doing.  Invisalign
has
great potential, but obviously can't be the right treatment for all
patients.
 Hopefully Zia Chishti, CEO of Invisalign, will correct this error as
soon as
possible.

Dr. Gregory Scott

Dear Greg

I think it is a big mistake to assume Invisalign is not intending to
damage the image of braces. In fact they seem to be going out of
their way to do just that. Take a look at the ads and tell me the last
time you saw those type of  large appliances on a patient. Listen to
what is being said and the viewer is left with the impression that
conventional braces are ugly, cause people not to smile, and are not
attractive. These are neither accidents or unintentional . I have no
problem in looking at Invisalign with an open mind as far as its use in
an orthodontic practice, but I won't delude myself into thinking they
don't really intend to malign conventional orthodontic appliances.


Ralph M. Perreca

Date: Wed, 18 Oct 2000 11:40:16 -0700
From: "Paul D. Zuelke" <zuelke@email.msn.com>
To: "ESCO" <Orthod-L@USC.edu>
Subject: Patient Quality
Message-ID: <003401c03932$dbdcc2c0$086fa8c0@potlnd1.or.home.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/related;
        type="multipart/alternative";
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0030_01C038F8.2F5C5900"

13d0a458.jpg 

We have been opposed to all forms of retail marketing/advertising for new patients since we started in 1980.  Every piece of evidence we have says that retail marketing attracts a very low quality patient with an extremely low (25% or less) rate of case acceptance.  Given that experience, our antennae perked up when we saw the Invisalign television ads. 
 
Last week I asked 250 of our client practices to carefully track the credit ratings of new patients coming in directly as a result of the television advertising.

We don't expect anything concrete for another month or so but my first days' report was 14 new patient exams, 12 "C" patients, 2 "B" patients, 0 "A" patients, 2 case starts.  Looks like past history is being reaffirmed but I will reserve judgment until I have a much larger response to evaluate.

BTW - A "C" patient is a person with clear and solid evidence (normally, but not always, contained in a credit report) that they cannot or will not pay in an appropriate manner.  A "B" patient is in a personally unstable situation(2 weeks on the job as a clerk at McDonald's) or is sloppy in his bill paying habits.  An "A" patient is a person without those problems.  "A" patients normally make up 75% of all patients likely to visit an orthodontic office.

When this mini study of patients responding to the Invisalign advertising is complete,  I will send results to anyone interested - no strings!

 

Paul Zuelke

Embedded Content: 13d0a458.jpg: 00000001,2e4b626c,00000000,00000000 Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\anabnr23.gif" Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\Nature Bkgrd3.jpg"
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 732

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) re:  insurance question
        by Idobraces@aol.com
  3) DDP participating/nonparticipating
        by "Dale E. Stocking" <dstockin@inreach.com>
  4) Re: X-ray scanners
        by Kevin Jarrell <kjarrell@sprynet.com>
  5) Dentoptix
        by MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
  6) ORTHO-LAB
        by "Bilal  KOLEILAT" <BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb>
  7) Re: Breakage
        by Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
  8) RE: X-Ray scanner
        by "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
  9) Coolpix settings
        by "Naspitz Clinica Odontologica" <clinica@naspitz.com.br>
 10) RE: Invisalign Advertising
        by "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
 11) Re: Patient Quality
        by MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
 12) Re:  731 Invisalign Advertising: make it work for you
        by Drted35@aol.com
 13) Invisalign
        by "Dr. Ronald G. Heiber" <DrHeiber@BraceMeUp.com>
 14) RE: invisalign
        by "Office" <office@nordstromd.com>
 15) Looking for my friend in St.Louis
        by "ANIL G" <dranilg@md5.vsnl.net.in>
 16) Invisalign: sorry to continue the thread
        by "Scott Smoron" <smoronsg@slu.edu>
 17) Re: Orthos
        by Rodrigo Frizzo Viecilli <philox@zaz.com.br>
 18) Oral Breath
        by "centrorsancancio" <centrorsancancio@multi.net.co>
 19) Invisalign
        by "Richard F. McBride" <rmcbride@sirinet.net>
 20) Archives
        by "Scott Smoron" <smoronsg@slu.edu>
 21) Old Digests
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2000 15:32:34 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001024153234.007b2920@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

39






Date: Sun, 22 Oct 2000 22:55:33 EDT
From: Idobraces@aol.com
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: re:  insurance question
Message-ID: <c4.ac4dc6f.272502a5@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

In our office we charge an additional fee for a combined
orthodontic/orthognathic surgical treatment.  I understand that this fee can
be submitted to the medical insurance company covering the surgery using the
same diagnostic CPT codes that the oral surgeons use.  If anyone is familiar
with this and,  in particular the procedural CPT codes, I would greatly
appreciate it.  Thank you.

Sherri Weissman
Birmingham, Alabama
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 18:37:25 -0700
From: "Dale E. Stocking" <dstockin@inreach.com>
To: ESCO <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: DDP participating/nonparticipating
Message-ID: <39F4E7D3.B0DFB5CE@inreach.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
 boundary="------------E16FF51BC506CA461274132A"

I am considering changing from a participating to non participating status with Delta Dental Plan.  I am interested in talking with those who have made this change and also those that have not been participating providers and have patients covered by DDP.

I think it would be best to communicate outside of this list for various reasons.  My e-mail address is:  dstockin@inreach.com

I am interested in how the change affected current DDP patients and also how changing to non participating status affected subsequent DDP patients.

My last accepted fee listing was is 1992 when DDP required listing of orthodontic fees in conjunction with their basing the codes on treatment times.  Prior to that, I had filed fees for the few things other than orthodontic codes (exam, x-rays, records, etc.)  From 1966 until 1992 I did not file orthodontic fees because my belief was that a filed fee had no affect on a patients receiving benefits.  In 1966, a typical CDS orthodontic benefit was 50% with a maximum of $500.  In our area, 1966 full treatment fees were in the $1000 range and patients paid the difference.  Today, the $1000 1966 fee, adjusted for inflation, would be in the $5000 range.

My 1992 accepted DDP filed fee for a panoramic x-ray is $45.  I have tried on two occasions, 1996 and 1998 to raise that fee and have been between 8+% to 11+% above the UCR for our area on each of my filings and resubmissions which included lowering other fees to fit into their formula.

I feel that I want to raise my panoramic fee.  I have a new x-ray machine, I double load film and send an original to the DDS, hazardous waste costs, etc.  In a recent dental practice magazine, the national median fee for a panoramic x-ray was listed as $63.  I know there is an approved DDP panoramic fee of $85 in our area because another office's check was included in a payment mailing to our office and that was a few years ago.

When I took out the DDP fee filing form and decided to try again, it irritated me that they summarily dropped to the 80th percentile for accepting fees. Then, realizing that what I was agreeing to by signing as a participating provider went against many of my beliefs, I decided to consider dropping from being a participating provider.

My administrative person feels that I am making a poor decision, however, understands and will go along and work through any transition.

As I look back, I wish I had never filed any fees.  I joined CDS when first in practice thinking that was the thing to do to support private practice.  Wow, how different 2000 is from 1966.

As stated above, I feel communication on this subject should be outside the ESCO list.

Dale E. Stocking
Stockton. CA
Date: Sat, 21 Oct 2000 12:58:02 -0500
From: Kevin Jarrell <kjarrell@sprynet.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: X-ray scanners
Message-ID: <39F1D92A.962CD68@sprynet.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

We have the Epson Expression 800 which we bought about a year ago.  It
is really a great piece of equipment, very fast and quiet.  This model
is not made anymore, but the 1600 appears to be its successor.  I would
highly recommend it.

Kevin Jarrell
Kokomo, IN

Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2000 23:58:01 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: ESCO <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Dentoptix
Message-ID: <39F11449.46F42B3C@adelphia.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hello All:

I finally made my purchase and now own a brand new Dentoptix Ceph unit.
So far so good until you are asked for a copy of the x-ray.  Not many
around here go with the email as a source of info so I am having to
print the x-rays.  I have an Epson Inkjet and I have a HP4+ Laser
Printer.

My 1st question:  What paper have you found to give the most realistic
copy for both the Inkjet and the Laserjet?

My second question:  Considering the speed of the laserjet, has anyone
compared the copy from each to find out if there is much of a
difference?

Thanks in advance,

Mark
--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Sat, 21 Oct 2000 13:43:23 +0200
From: "Bilal  KOLEILAT" <BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb>
To: "orthodontic study group" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: ORTHO-LAB
Message-ID: <200010211055.DAA14877@usc.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Bilal Koleilat
DDS,MSc
Clinical Assistant
Dept. Of Orthodontics
Beirut Arab Universisty
Beirut-Lebanon

DEAR COLLEGUES

kindly , provide me with the address, email, telephone number
of a specialised ortho lab that performs lingual set up.
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 12:44:16 +1000
From: Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Breakage
Message-ID: <4.3.1.2.20001023095750.00de8eb0@pop.netspace.net.au>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="=====================_15114803==_.ALT"

Dear Andre
At 03:23 PM 13/10/00 -0400, you wrote:
I have encountered a patient who has systematically broken a 16 X 22 SS wire between the upper two centrals. <snip>

One thing I have learnt is that anything is possible... says he with the advantage (or disadvantage) of twice the experience you have :>).

As usual, I agree with Mark Lively. How old was the wire, since hydrogen embrittlement is very real with old stock (>4 years) especially if not sealed away from water vapor?

Tengku's story is indirectly supported too from now on. What makes me suspicious about the continual breakage is your wording "Mother is adamant... " How often do we hear that with non-compliance, e.g. when elastics are obviously not being worn, and a few weeks of Jumpers shows there is no ankylosis, etc. What was it that Shakespeare said, something like "She doth complain too much"?

However, there is the patient's side to be empathetically considered too like the one being  reported by me in the December 2000 issue of the WJO, where, by correcting the max second molars with buccal root torque, the boy said his elastics did not make his teeth sore any more. Maybe read the other anecdote about the 53 year old nurse who, with much questioning, eventually worked out that she was slamming her incisors together during sleep, which was stopping the overjet reduction.

The point is that getting a true history is not always easy as per my report in the AOJ. It was about suspected anabolic steroids in a muscular female butterfly swimmer causing loss of alveolar bone around the anteriors about 18 years ago, rather than the archwires. The orthopedic surgeon who operated on her knee was most interested in my hypothesis since he had noticed something odd too. It was somewhat confirmed by another definite steroid report of alveolar loss from post-surgery vertical elastics also in the AOJ not long afterwards.

About 25 years ago, a young lady (?) was having an osteotomy with the hope of improving her attitude at the request of the police sociologist. She was an inmate of a reformatory. Within days of the surgery, she handed me the inter-occlusal wafer.... anything to get attention!! In those days, the wafers were wired in, so the pain to break the heavy wires with a surgically broken mandible must have been incredible -- worse than for those children who dismantle their Jumpers nowadays.

The best story about wire was about 30 years ago. And this is a true, I swear. In those days, extractions were more common and the four-fours had been removed prior to treatment for a boy whose parents were dairy farmers. The study models showed that one upper cuspid was partly erupted. Mother rang just before the banding to say that he had had another tooth extracted by a cow. (Yeah, yeah). So I said could I see him straight away to sort out this (ridiculous) story. When he arrived, there was the cleanest extraction of the upper cuspid you have ever seen. There were no signs of associated trauma around the socket or face!! Mother, a typically sensible farmer's wife, said "He was walking behind the milking cows, when one got a length of loose fencing wire caught around its hind hoof and panicked by kicking its leg. The wire lashed around and went around his eye-tooth and extracted it!!"

Herein, with respect, Andre, ends your bedtime stories.... better than those your Mom told you?



Regards,
Barry

Dr B. Mollenhauer      Fax: 61-3-9499 5771
Orthodontist             Tel: 61-3-9499 3812 (Business hours)
Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2000 14:30:37 -0500
From: "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
To: "ESCO Listserver \(E-mail\)" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: X-Ray scanner
Message-ID: <3B20254E881FD41199C0204C4F4F5020308E@O2>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Chris-
We have had excellent results with our
EPSON Expression 650 Scanner.

Greg Hoeltzel
Saint Louis

-----Original Message-----
From: Chris Greeff [mailto:chris@icon.co.za]
Sent: Sunday, October 15, 2000 7:47 AM
To: ESCO
Subject: X-Ray scanner


Can anybody recommend a good quality easy to use scanner?

Must be able to scan Pans and Cephs at a reasonable speed

Thanks in advance


Chris Greeff
Centurion
South Africa
chris@icon.co.za


Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2000 09:00:00 -0200
From: "Naspitz Clinica Odontologica" <clinica@naspitz.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Coolpix settings
Message-ID: <003601c03daa$da9052c0$eb1fe0c8@notebook>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0032_01C03D98.CAD5B3A0"

Dear group,
Some members stated that the Nikon Coolpix 950 is a great digital camera to use in the office. I'm asking for these member to tell us the setting they use for intra and extra oral pictures.
TIA, Sincerely,
Nelson Naspitz
clinica@naspitz.com.br
Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2000 15:04:04 -0500
From: "Greg Hoeltzel" <orthocons@stlnet.com>
To: "ESCO Listserver \(E-mail\)" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: Invisalign Advertising
Message-ID: <3B20254E881FD41199C0204C4F4F50203090@O2>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit


I received an email from an individual asking
what I charge for a 12 month Invisalign case.
("24 aligner sets")
Anyone else hear from this guy? You don't suppose
it was eBay?

Greg Hoeltzel
Saint Louis

-----Original Message-----
From: DRGSCOTT@aol.com [mailto:DRGSCOTT@aol.com]
Sent: Saturday, October 14, 2000 6:24 PM
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisalign Advertising


Like Paulo, I have also been concerned about the negative message that the
Invisalign ads are sending.  I'm sure they did not intend to do damage to
the
image of braces, but that is exactly what the ads are doing.  Invisalign has
great potential, but obviously can't be the right treatment for all
patients.
 Hopefully Zia Chishti, CEO of Invisalign, will correct this error as soon
as
possible.

Dr. Gregory Scott

Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2000 17:38:22 -0400
From: MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Patient Quality
Message-ID: <39F0BB4E.E7A63104@adelphia.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Paul:

Thanks for the info.  I have been trying to educate my own patients as
to the limitations of the appliances and that wearing braces today is
not what it was 20 years ago, regardless of what the Invisalign
commercials portray.

As for those calling our office, we have referred them to a colleague
down the street until we feel more comfortable with the product.
"Thousands of patients in treatment" versus "thousands of patients
having been treated" are two different things.

Mark

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Sat, 21 Oct 2000 09:23:03 EDT
From: Drted35@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re:  731 Invisalign Advertising: make it work for you
Message-ID: <90.b268d8e.2722f2b7@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear Brothers and Sisters,
    In the Invisalign ad I saw, a man who seems apparently quite happy with
his metal braces is less appreciated by the girl who is wearing Invisalign. 
Of course it would be impossible for Align to make a statement about how nice
Invisalign is if the guy were wearing clear-transparent braces with
tooth-colored wire or Lingual braces. In my practice every patient is offered
(without extra cost) the clear braces, and guess what, I do not have a single
adult (practice is 48% adults) with metal braces.  What is there to carp
about? So from an Invisalign ad a would-be patient learns about Invisalign
and metal braces and not knowing about clear-fixed or lingual says "At last I
can have my teeth straightened."  So he finally makes an appointment and goes
to see the orthodontis who tells him that "HE IS NOT A CANDIDATE FOR
INVISALIGN,"  however, the orthodontist continues, "I can offer you these
clear-transparent braces and I can offer you these braces that go behing the
teeth".  So lads I say make hay while the sun is shining.  Cordially my
brothers and sisters,  Ted  :-)
Date: Sat, 21 Oct 2000 12:08:21 -0400
From: "Dr. Ronald G. Heiber" <DrHeiber@BraceMeUp.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <B61737B4.7CC%DrHeiber@BraceMeUp.com>
Mime-version: 1.0
Content-type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-transfer-encoding: 7bit

I have been sitting here on the Invisalign sidelines thinking that while it
certainly wasn't an orthodontic panacea the advertising of orthodontic
treatment of any kind couldn't hurt the profession. Well maybe that's
changed...

I am finding  that, like Paul Zuelke, the patients coming in for exams due
to Invisalign TV  promotions are hardly the highly motivated patients we
have from our own office based marketing efforts. First, might be the
impression that if it is advertised on TV it must be mass marketed and
therefore "cheap." Cheap is about the last thing Invisalign qualifies as.
And as Mr. Zuelke's informal survey has indicated, they aren't as credit
worthy as our more traditionally attracted patients. Heck, these people were
motivated by an ad on TV. They'll buy anything with the proper stimulus and
probably have already stretched their credit limits.  So the ads make it
look quick, easy and cheap. Those are three words that one would never
associate with quality orthodontic care. No wonder that so many of these
patients gather up the information at an exam and are never heard from
again.

Next, and maybe more important was a comment this week from on of my "20
something" patients in conventional treatment with esthetic ceramic braces.
She asked if I had seen the ads for "those new, invisible braces." I said
yes and waited while she told me how insulted she was by the tone and
assumptions in the ad. She said her teeth never looked so good even with the
braces on, and that the people portrayed with braces were getting a bum rap.
So much for Invisalign's marketing strategy. They will need to have a long
talk with their ad agency about who they are appealing to and how to win a
market share without destroying the whole market to begin with.

Sorry for another posting about Invisalign, but I feel better already.

Ron Heiber
Date: Sat, 21 Oct 2000 10:19:30 -0700
From: "Office" <office@nordstromd.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE: invisalign
Message-ID: <LOBBIGKBIBJJCIHOGNFIOEPBCCAA.office@nordstromd.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
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Thanks Paul for the initial evidence that speaks directly to the lack of
business and professional maturity within the Invisalign corporate
structure. This can unfortunately injure many, and perhaps kill a good idea.
Creativity and wisdom are not the same thing.

As was mentioned in another post, the seasoned orthodontic manufacturers and
suppliers have worked within the professional system, generally preserving
professional integrity and credibility. Most of them have grown out of
long-term players, which began with a service and built a business while
establishing trust. This is typically the way "A" people make important
decisions, and in stark contrast to the daytime TV mentality. We have all
seen good ideas come to market independently, the risks to the responsible
professional are higher.

Not as a criticism, but observation ... this quality of decisionmaking
usually comes with age and experience, and it would be unreasonable to
expect a youthful president and CEO to be naturally endowed with it merely
as a consequence of having a terrific idea. A WISE choice would be to humbly
accept the fact that they just don't have the experience in the profession,
and team up with a reputable company that does.

Darick Nordstrom

Date: Thu, 19 Oct 2000 10:59:21 +0530
From: "ANIL G" <dranilg@md5.vsnl.net.in>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Looking for my friend in St.Louis
Message-ID: <000001c03c36$c26874e0$abe8013d@anilg>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0054_01C039BB.A2D66100"

Dear Friends
                 I am looking for my friend Dr.Abu Joseph .He is an Orthodontist and doing private practice in St.Louis.If anybody know him please inform him about the message
thank you
Anil
Orthodontist from India
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 19:31:14 -0500
From: "Scott Smoron" <smoronsg@slu.edu>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign: sorry to continue the thread
Message-ID: <023f01c03d51$b83c9fc0$eff4fe9e@slu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
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A criticism with a constructive clinical question.

Does Align have the capability to integrate a plane into the aligners??
Splints with the potential to correct occlusal disharmony would be
interesting.  It would at least expand the options for TMD treatment.  But,
as pointed out earlier, their technology would have to include imaging
dynamic occlusal relatinships.  Does Align have any intention of going this
way or integrating dynamic relationships?

Since invisalign is watching, would anyone (from Align) formally like to
comment on the "misquote" about the "horse and buggy" comment.  I read the
previous response from Inivisalign, but felt it fell far short of sincere
when I have seen this misquote at least three times in three different
cities about two weeks apart.  For those who have not seen this in print, it
is insulting to all orthodontists, misquote or not.  Here was the invisalign
response.

"Dr. Lebsack also cites an article in USA today that portrays orthodontics
as
being in the "horse and buggy" mode.  In fact, many papers carried that
phrase as a direct quote from my partner, Ms. Kelsey Wirth who is the
President of Align Technology.  Let me state categorically that what you
read is a misquote.  In fact, what Kelsey was referring to was the
structural difficulties of introducing a transforming change into a well
established marketplace.  When the motorcar was first introduced, many horse
and buggy drivers criticized it for all manner of perceived imperfections:
can't drive it on anything but a paved road, needs expensive gasoline rather
than cheap horsefeed, breaks down all the time, requires gears, are ugly,
and so on.  Kelsey was referring to some of the reactions we were receiving
from orthodontists who perceived us in a similar fashion.  By no means did
she mean to imply anything ill or dismissive regarding the current practice
of orthodontics.  The comment was simply misquoted out of context and we
regret if there was any offense taken."

"Simply" or not, insulting.  Also, to shrug it off with, "if any offense
taken," really shows a continued lack of understanding of how offensive the
"misquote" is.

In addition, the commercials also are undermining traditional orthodontic
care.  Invisalign itself acknowledges that in the end, they will not replace
traditional fixed appliances, yet they deride them in their commercials.  So
for every dollar they spend with this advertising tact, orthodontists will
have to spend their time and money (through the AAO and the like) to repair
the damage.  Any comment on this from Align.


Date: Sun, 22 Oct 2000 19:25:03 -0200
From: Rodrigo Frizzo Viecilli <philox@zaz.com.br>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu, orthoforum@egroups.com
Subject: Re: Orthos
Message-ID: <39F35B2F.B1177543@zaz.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit



> Hello all,
>
>     Does anyone know where can I get technical information about the
> Orthos system by  Dr. Craig Andreiko/Ormco?
>     I'd like to have more specific information about the system, beyond
> the "Clinical Impressions" articles and Dr. Andreiko's interview to JCO.
>
> Best wishes,
>
> Dr. Rodrigo F. Viecilli
> Instituto Rio-Grandense de Ortodontia
> Canoas-RS
> Brazil

Date: Fri, 20 Oct 2000 21:05:04 -0500
From: "centrorsancancio" <centrorsancancio@multi.net.co>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Oral Breath
Message-ID: <01c03b03$53c60180$a82c1ec8@default>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0046_01C03AD9.6AEFF980"

Dear colleagues,
I am working in a research project with an ENT regarding the oral breath habit and its effects on the facial growth. One of the major problems we have find is how to measure or determinate a patient is an "Oral Breath" case. Does any of you knows an answer to solve this matter in an objective way? We appreciate all your comments.
Carlos E. Gomez
Manizales,Colombia
carrqiue@emtelsa.multi.net.co
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 23:28:30 -0500
From: "Richard F. McBride" <rmcbride@sirinet.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Invisalign
Message-ID: <200010240417.e9O4HVL27172@puma.sirinet.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I too am concerned about the advertising.  I have taken the seminar and am
set up to do Invisaligns but cannot see them being a very large part of my
practice.  They are very limited in what they can do at this point and so
most of us will need to do conventional orthodontics on the majority of our
patients.  Invisalign is not making our job any easier with the negative
images of conventional treatment.  Most of my potential Invisalign patients
do not schedule an appointment when they find out the costs.

Dick McBride
Lawton, OK
Date: Mon, 23 Oct 2000 19:15:37 -0500
From: "Scott Smoron" <smoronsg@slu.edu>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Archives
Message-ID: <021201c03d4f$89c9fa40$eff4fe9e@slu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Is there a searchable archive of discussions from the past?

scott smoron

Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2000 16:12:22 -0700
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: Old Digests
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001024161222.007a4e70@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

October 24, 2000

Dear Colleagues:

At the present time we do not have searchable archives, although that may
arrive soon.  However, you can obtain previous digests:

To get archives for ORTHOD-L, first get the index, which will show the name
of the file. To get the index, send email to: listproc@usc.edu

As the text in the body of the message put:

INDEX ORTHOD-L

Once you have that listing, you will see filenames starting with "log" and
a description with the digest number of the first digest contained.

The filename has 4 digits and a letter, denoting the year and month, and
the week of the month. Thus log0002a would be all digests for week 1 of Feb
2000. Each archive holds digests for the week.

To get that archive, as an example, you send email to: listproc@usc.edu

As the text of the message body put:

GET ORTHOD-L log0002a


Enjoy!


Joseph Zernik

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 733

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) severe resorption
        by "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>
  3) Re: Breakage + parafunction
        by Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
  4) Herbst Appliance
        by "David M. Lebsack" <dml-4266@ccp.com>
  5) Breakage revisited
        by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Andr=E9_Ruest?= <aruest@compuserve.com>
  6)
        by Errico Bucci <erx007tr@libero.it> (by way of Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>)
  7) Re: Dentoptix
        by WRed852509@cs.com
  8) Re: Dentoptix
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  9) Re: X-ray scanners
        by "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
 10) coolpix 990
        by "Gustavo K Bastos" <gkb@uol.com.br>
 11) In office Lab
        by "Dr. Robert Hatheway" <drbob@nb.sympatico.ca>
 12) Re: Oral Breath
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 13) Article from Newspaper
        by "Scott Smoron" <smoronsg@slu.edu>
 14) AAO  Position on Product and Treatment Endorsements
        by "Pearson, James" <jpearson@aaortho.org>
 15) AAO-member comments on materials. . .
        by "Mickey, Larry" <lmickey@aaortho.org>
 16) Re: Orthos
        by WRed852509@cs.com
 17) ortho photos
        by HeyScoobie@aol.com
 18) Kein Thema
        by Madsenh@aol.com
 19) Job Opportunity listing
        by Bob Hurdle <sailor37@mediaone.net>
 20) Re: Invisalign
        by "Barry Raphael" <baronlin@concentric.net>
 21) Orthodontist in Perth
        by "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
 22) Surgical Orthodontic Fellowship 2001-2002
        by "Barry H. Grayson" <barry.grayson@med.nyu.edu>
Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2000 15:47:40 -0800
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001031154740.007e2660@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

40







Date: Fri, 27 Oct 2000 08:58:31 +0800
From: "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>
To: "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: severe resorption
Message-ID: <001901c03fb1$0da43340$210d16ac@TOMI1.GRMC.GOV.CN>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="gb2312"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear group,
A 15-yr old male came to my observation with a Class III malocclusion. All
of his first premolars (4) were extracted. Placing the Edgewise appliance
for 14 months, I have corrected his overbite. Last month he returned to me
for a follow-up examination when I noticed something unusual. His labial
gingiva began to resorb at the lower lateral incisor and canine (42 & 43)
with the root exposed. The resorption became more severe in his third visit
last Tuesday. About half of the labial gingiva of 42 and 43 were found to
expose and the teeth in question had no contact with the maxillary 22 and
23.
Question 1: why is there such resorption of the gingiva of 42 and 43? And in
such a degree?
Question 2: what is my next move to tackle the problem best?
I appreciate all your comments.

Silvia Zhou (Ms.)
Orthodontist
CHINA


Date: Sat, 28 Oct 2000 18:14:13 +1000
From: Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Breakage + parafunction
Message-ID: <4.3.1.2.20001028111300.00df4a60@pop.netspace.net.au>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="=====================_2641951==_.ALT"

Hi,

Mark Cordato sent a personal posting to update/correct my "Breakage" posting and our thread is below the lines. As old friends, we have had many personal exchanges over the years -- invariably of benefit to both parties. In this case, we obviously agree that the observation applies to subpopulations (minorities). Thanks also to Joe for ESCO, to be able to read other people's threads.
___________________________________________________________________

Dear Mark,
At 09:25 PM 25/10/00 +1000, you replied to the part:
>> more. Maybe read the other anecdote about the 53 year old nurse who,
>> with much questioning, eventually worked out that she was slamming her
>> incisors together during sleep, which was stopping the overjet
>> reduction.
 
>This is interesting because the gnathologists (McHorris) often say
>patients parafunction in CR when asleep, not in CO, and this is almost
>accepted as the common occurence. I am not sure of the details
>whether it is one condyle or both in CR for bruxing.

I suppose this is an example of the downside of abstracting or simplifying... even my own article. That is, all details can become important in diagnosis. However, this is not peculiar to diagnosis, as Hollingdale stated in his introduction to 'A Nietzsche Reader' (Penguin, 1977) "Simplification... is to some extent a falsification."

Whatever the parafunctional theory, as soon as the patient told me about "slamming" her incisors from a very open position (naturally it took a few months of discussions, since I persisted questioning with the hypothesis that she was clenching during sleep), I asked her to wear anterior vertical elastics at night to support the mandible up closer to the rest position. Then -- with the same Class II 2oz elastics -- the overjet reduced quickly at  >1mm per month. Yet the overjet had not changed for many many months previously. In other words, the response was similar to applying Buccal Root Torque to some upper second molars.

But on the subject of theory...  As opposed to bruxing that uses different muscles and is noisy, I understood that clenching is usually done in protrusion. Teleologically, this could be Nature's way of avoiding the extruded upper palatal cusps in many individuals. Whatever the mechanism, the nocturnal clenching on the anteriors causes ischemia of the perio ligament to slow tooth movement... completely on occasion. It further explains why well-applied Buccal Root Torque, to raise the palatal cusps, redeems incisor tooth movement to normal/optimum rates as covered in my WJO Part II paper.

>There are exceptions and this is where guys like Every with his theory on Thegosis and >occlusion get a run too.

I did stress in the text that the vertical elastics were not to be used in a cookbook manner. The point is, as with every recognized TMD expert I have ever heard, that one needs to listen empathetically and open-mindedly to the patient when the diagnosis is not obvious.

I'm sure I read, but have forgotten the details of, Thegosis and occlusion. Wasn't this covered in an article in the ADJ of recent years?

[Mark OK'ed this personal exchange being posted on ESCO, and his reply included : "I read a book of his (Every), and as he was a Kiwi, I expect there would have been an ADJ article. I suspect it is only relevant to a minority of cases ... but for that minority it is important."]
______________________________________________________________________


PS: Mark, I finally found the relevant ADJ issue in the kitchen... the "Commander-in-chief" is not impressed with where I leave my journals!!

The title itself is rather significant (for others, thegosis = sharpen/whet [Gk]) :
Thegosis -- a critical review. Murray CG and Sanson GD. Aust Dent J. 43 (3):192-198, 1998

I now recall my reaction on first reading it. It was that thegotic theory missed one small subpopulation that is important to us... those patients who sharpen their incisors by Coca Coca and Pepsi Cola. As well as the more obvious feathering of the lower incisor edges, inspection of the lingual surface of the upper incisors will show ledging in the serious addicts of these drinks!! The parsimonious dental literature lulls readers with the bland generic term 'cola drinks'. As well as much sugar and phosphoric acid, the caffeine (added to the legal limit) gives patients headaches for 2-3 weeks trying to kick the habit. I wish studies on white spot lesions would recognize this etiology by careful and subtle (read cunning) history taking.



Regards,
Barry

Dr B. Mollenhauer      Fax: 61-3-9499 5771
Orthodontist             Tel: 61-3-9499 3812 (Business hours)
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2000 19:52:23 -0500
From: "David M. Lebsack" <dml-4266@ccp.com>
To: Orthodontic Study <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Herbst Appliance
Message-ID: <39F8D159.323F2379@ccp.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii; x-mac-type="54455854"; x-mac-creator="4D4F5353"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Been using herbst for sometime. I belong to Oakstone medical's  online
literature review service. Most of the abstracts from the literature
review service are not very supportive of the Herbst appliance. Most
correction is dento-alveolar with a lot of mandibular incisor tipping.

Have any of you
Herbst user evaluated results?

David M. Lebsack DDS MS

Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 11:46:19 -0400
From: André Ruest <aruest@compuserve.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Breakage revisited
Message-ID: <00f701c03e9a$db683820$0a8021a1@portatifdell>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_00F4_01C03E79.309F8720"

Dear group,
 
I would like to thank those who responded to my Breakage thread
 
Mark Lively and Barry Mollenhauer suggested  defective wires
The wires I used in both instances were brand-new Unitek 16 X 22 SS from two different batches
Barry wrote:
>How old was the wire, since hydrogen embrittlement is very real with old stock (>4 years) especially if not sealed >away from water vapor?
 
My question is: Is there literature on this specific subject?
 
Tengku Sinannaga wrote:
>...converting the speed brackets at the anterior teeth with the old type of A-company straight wire brackets (quite >a broad one) to reduce interbracket width which could increase the "stiffness" and make it more difficult for the >patient to manipulate any clipping instrument successfully.
 
Good idea but why should we compensate for the patient's inability to be compliant?
 
The intent of my original thread was to begin a discussion on general compliance and how parents and patients will lie to avoid admitting that they have done something wrong. I am ready to admit my own failures but I still cannot understand how stiff wires can be broken by either naturally occuring forces in the mouth or extraneaous forces from instruments available in the patient's home.
 
Thank you again to those who responded
 
Dr André Ruest, Orthodontist
Date: Tue, 24 Oct 2000 15:49:57 -0700
From: Errico Bucci <erx007tr@libero.it> (by way of Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>)
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001024154957.007b63e0@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Dear Colleagues
I have worked like orthodontist at least for 20 years with good results:
but only  this year I had three cases of  TMD (temporomandibular disorders)
that are getting worse 4 months after treatment;
I have to:
1) put suddenly  a splint and  look for a relaxed   position of mandible
(without complaints and symptoms)
2)selective grinding for centric-prematurities
3) wait & see

thanks for your help

yours Faithfully

dr Errico Bucci
sp. Orthodontics
Italy





Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 02:21:53 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Dentoptix
Message-ID: <44.855713a.2727d601@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Mark,
Kodak has a new printer that prints on a blue film material and the result
looks like an x-ray.  The new printer costs arounfd $900.  The Codonics
printer which uses a dye-sublimation process and produces a beautiful 
printed x-ray on blue film costs $12,000.  There is a tremendous difference
in price and quality of result, but when presented with both x-rays, most
orthodontists would pick the Kodak printer and product.

You may want to convert you digital image database to a website that allows
limited access by referring professionals.  If you would like to try our
site, username is test and password is test and the website is
www.redmondorthodontics.com
If you are interested in the program used to develope the site, it is called
alchemy and is used to convert a large .tif file to a smaller .jpg file. 
Please contact me if you would like additional info.
Good Luck,
Ron Redmond
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2000 06:37:12 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "MDLhome" <mdlively@adelphia.net>, "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Dentoptix
Message-ID: <04ac01c03f38$b384d7c0$43111918@paultower>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I have an HP4+ and it just doesn't cut it for grey scale graphic detail.  If
you want near photo quality, use the glossy Epson paper or equivalent.  If
it's a routine dupe, I'd use inkjet paper at a lower quality setting so you
don't use so much ink.  The cartidges for the inkjets aren't exactly cheap!

Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Orthodontics and Oral and
Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Chapel Hill, NC

----- Original Message -----
From: "MDLhome" <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2000 11:58 PM
Subject: Dentoptix


> Hello All:
>
> I finally made my purchase and now own a brand new Dentoptix Ceph unit.
> So far so good until you are asked for a copy of the x-ray.  Not many
> around here go with the email as a source of info so I am having to
> print the x-rays.  I have an Epson Inkjet and I have a HP4+ Laser
> Printer.
>
> My 1st question:  What paper have you found to give the most realistic
> copy for both the Inkjet and the Laserjet?
>
> My second question:  Considering the speed of the laserjet, has anyone
> compared the copy from each to find out if there is much of a
> difference?
>
> Thanks in advance,
>
> Mark
> --
>
> Mark David Lively, DMD
> mdlively@adelphia.net
>
> Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
> 106 N. Colorado Avenue
> Stuart,  FL  34990
>
>
>

Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 06:16:48 +0200
From: "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: X-ray scanners
Message-ID: <002501c03e3a$658c6960$0e07a8c0@icon.co.za>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Thank you

Chris Greeff
Centurion
South Africa
chris@icon.co.za

----- Original Message -----
From: Kevin Jarrell <kjarrell@sprynet.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Saturday, October 21, 2000 7:58 PM
Subject: Re: X-ray scanners


> We have the Epson Expression 800 which we bought about a year ago.  It
> is really a great piece of equipment, very fast and quiet.  This model
> is not made anymore, but the 1600 appears to be its successor.  I would
> highly recommend it.
>
> Kevin Jarrell
> Kokomo, IN
>

Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 18:34:18 -0200
From: "Gustavo K Bastos" <gkb@uol.com.br>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: coolpix 990
Message-ID: <012701c03ec3$7a195800$eee4c5c8@oemcomputer>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_00F4_01C03EB2.2F863800"

Dear friends,
 
I bought a nikon 990 coolpix last month. Does anyone know were can I find more info about the specific configuration I should use to get the best of this camera when shooting extra and intra oral photos ?
 
Sincerely
Gustavo K Bastos
gkb@altavista.net
 
Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 17:07:02 -0300
From: "Dr. Robert Hatheway" <drbob@nb.sympatico.ca>
To: "Orthodontic Study Club (E-mail)" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: In office Lab
Message-ID: <006c01c03ebf$2b3a71a0$cefaa68e@nb.sympatico.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Colleagues,

I am considering hiring a lab technician to work full time in my practice. I
would be interested in any experience you may have with this.

Thanks in advance.


Bob

Hatheway Orthodontics
Dr. Robert Hatheway
126 Brunswick Street
Fredericton, NB, E3B 1G6
CANADA
(506) 455-9775 (work)  455-0213 (home)  454-0742 (fax)
mailto:drbob@nb.sympatico.ca (e-mail)
http://www.hathewayorthodontics.com/ (internet)


Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2000 06:44:15 -0400
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "centrorsancancio" <centrorsancancio@multi.net.co>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Oral Breath
Message-ID: <04bd01c03f39$afa6bdc0$43111918@paultower>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_04BA_01C03F18.287CB3C0"

Is it the mode of breathing or the resultant jaw posture?  Do a Pub Med search using author names Don Warren, Peter Vig and Sten Linder-Aronson (sp?).  I think you will find that this question has been beaten to death in the literature but still rises like the Phoenix for repeat attention.
 
Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Orthodontics and Oral and
Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Chapel Hill, NC
----- Original Message -----
From: centrorsancancio
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Sent: Friday, October 20, 2000 10:05 PM
Subject: Oral Breath

Dear colleagues,
I am working in a research project with an ENT regarding the oral breath habit and its effects on the facial growth. One of the major problems we have find is how to measure or determinate a patient is an "Oral Breath" case. Does any of you knows an answer to solve this matter in an objective way? We appreciate all your comments.
Carlos E. Gomez
Manizales,Colombia
carrqiue@emtelsa.multi.net.co
Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 07:42:46 -0500
From: "Scott Smoron" <smoronsg@slu.edu>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Article from Newspaper
Message-ID: <000001c03eba$69539b60$e1f3fe9e@slu.edu>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/related;
        type="multipart/alternative";
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_0026_01C03E57.2AAAFE20"

I realized I had the article handy, so those outside the country can take a look.  I hope this doesn't add too much download time.  It's from the Daily Herald, a suburban Chicago newspaper, from 10/10/00.
13d0c78d.jpg
13d0c819.jpg

Date: Fri, 27 Oct 2000 11:54:21 -0500
From: "Pearson, James" <jpearson@aaortho.org>
To: "'ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU'" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: AAO  Position on Product and Treatment Endorsements
Message-ID: <90A44E376D87D11192BD00805F3153C28E1B49@NT1>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"

Hello everyone,

The AAO is currently receiving numerous of request as to where we stand on
product endorsements and treatment techniques. Below is the response we have
been giving to both members and consumers in regard to these inquiries. I
hope you find it helpful, and I encourage you to forward them along to
others who may be interested.

Regards,

Jim Pearson
Internet Services Manager
American Association of Orthodontists (AAO)
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
-------------------------------------

The AAO's Position on Product and Treatment Endorsements (for members):

Because each patient is unique, the orthodontic materials and treatment
methods used are best determined by each patient's orthodontist in
consultation with the patient.  The AAO neither evaluates nor takes a
position on orthodontic materials or treatment methods used by our members.

The AAO does not have a database regarding which members use which
orthodontic materials or treatment methods.  Therefore, we recommend you
contact one or more AAO-member orthodontists to discuss your orthodontic
concerns.   To obtain a list of AAO-member orthodontists near you, please
visit our Web site at http://www.aaortho.org/referral.html.  Or you may
call 1-800-STRAIGHT to locate AAO members.

When a member has a comment regarding a particular orthodontic material,
technology, and/or service, and/or marketing communications for these items,
the AAO recommends that the member communicate his/her comment directly to
the appropriate manufacturer, vendor, or consultant. The AAO neither
evaluates nor takes a position on marketing communications for these items
or on orthodontic materials or treatment methods used by AAO member
orthodontists.

The AAO's Position on Product and Treatment Endorsements (for consumers):

Because each patient is unique, the orthodontic materials and treatment
methods used are best determined by each patient's orthodontist in
consultation with the patient.  The AAO neither evaluates nor takes a
position on orthodontic materials or treatment methods used by our members.

The AAO does not have a database regarding which members use which
orthodontic materials or treatment methods.  Therefore, we recommend you
contact one or more AAO-member orthodontists to discuss your orthodontic
concerns.   To obtain a list of AAO-member orthodontists near you, please
visit our Web site at http://www.aaortho.org/referral.html.  Or you may
call 1-800-STRAIGHT to locate AAO members.
Date: Fri, 27 Oct 2000 15:42:51 -0500
From: "Mickey, Larry" <lmickey@aaortho.org>
To: "'orthod-l@usc.edu'" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: AAO-member comments on materials. . .
Message-ID: <90A44E376D87D11192BD00805F3153C27BBC77@NT1>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain

Please note: 

When an AAO member has a comment regarding a particular orthodontic
material, technology, and/or service, and/or marketing communications for
these items, the AAO recommends that the member communicate his/her comment
directly to the appropriate manufacturer, vendor, or consultant. The AAO
neither evaluates nor takes a position on marketing communications for these
items or on orthodontic materials or treatment methods used by AAO member
orthodontists.

Submitted by:
larry mickey
Director of Communications & Marketing
American Association of Orthodontists
St. Louis, Missouri, USA
Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 02:37:27 EDT
From: WRed852509@cs.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Orthos
Message-ID: <e3.b73e29f.2727d9a7@cs.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Hi Rodrigo,
If you will visit the Ormco (Sybron) website and leave a message for Craig,
I'm sure he will get in touch with you.
Ron Redmond
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2000 12:46:57 EDT
From: HeyScoobie@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: ortho photos
Message-ID: <6f.c39d536.2729ba01@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Does anyone know where I can get those black ortho photo mounts that have the
precut windows that I can use for the initial photo records.

Dr. Keller
Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2000 05:34:30 EST
From: Madsenh@aol.com
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: Kein Thema
Message-ID: <f7.4193a31.272ffa36@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Dear colleagues,

since three years I have the AJODO, the JCO and the Angle Orthodontist on
CD-ROMs. These were produced by Optimedia, first distributed by Ormco, later
by Unitek.
Now Unitek has stopped to deliver the CD-ROMs, which have become
indespensable in my practice.
Does anybody know who produces and distributes these CD-ROMs now?

Dr Henning Madsen
Ludwigstr 36
67059 Ludwigshafen, Germany                           www.madsen.de
Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2000 11:02:40 -0600
From: Bob Hurdle <sailor37@mediaone.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Job Opportunity listing
Message-ID: <39FEFB30.387746BC@mediaone.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Full time Position available

Orthodontist needed Full Time for our well established full service west
suburban Chicago group practice. You'll work with excellent assistants
and support staff in brand new office space. We are a FFS practice with
no managed care. If you would like to be a part of our dynamic and
growing practice serving an ever expanding patient base, or if you know
someone who might be interested, please contact Dr. Robert Hurdle at
sailor37@mediaone.net

Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2000 20:53:45 -0400
From: "Barry Raphael" <baronlin@concentric.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <004001c03fb0$5d26ed00$020a0a0a@consult>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am an Invisalign practioner. I've spoken in favor of the appliance in this
arena before.  Most cases are going well.  I still have good things to say.

But I need help on this one: an ethical issue that I think will become more
prevalent as we use the appliance more.  Here's the case.
25 y/o female. Beautiful - like Janet Jackson. "Hates" the way the upper
central is turned and "Hates" the crowded lower incisors.

Now get this: Overjet is 9mm, molars full Class II.  With gentle probing, I
find that 1)She is not concerned with the protrusion of the upper incisors,
2) She is not concerned at all about the overjet, and 3) There is "No way"
that she will wear braces.  He job is "too demanding" and she does not want
to be seen in braces (OK boys, don't get your bristles up. That IS who the
advertising is aiming at, after all).

The question is: Do I do the Invisalign to satisfy the patient's chief
concern , or do I say that your case is not suitable for Invisalign? Do I do
the Invisalign case EVEN IF  I give a full informed consent about the
limitations of the treatment, the risks of leaving a Class II malocclusion,
the impact of long term stability, AND the caveat that fixed appliances will
be needed in the event she is not satisfied with the results?  Because I am
sure I could get this lady to sign on the dotted line if she thought she
could get that incisor in line without braces.

Perhaps we face the same quandries with fixed appliances too when there are
legitimate options (ideal vs compensation, x vs non-x, surg, and so on).

The decision is easy when I can see the compromise may cause harm, or may
eliminate a more ideal therapy in the future.

But when the treatment seems quite harmless, or I know that I can always
resort to the proper treatment if it becomes indicated, the decision lines
become blurry.

And this is where Invisalign is going to present the greatest challenge.
Deciding which cases to do, and which to pass on.

Any comments?

Barry Raphael
Clifton, NJ

Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 06:24:26 +0200
From: "Chris Greeff" <chris@icon.co.za>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Orthodontist in Perth
Message-ID: <009001c03e3b$766b25e0$0e07a8c0@icon.co.za>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="----=_NextPart_000_008D_01C03E4C.395CE600"

I have a patient moving to Perth, Australia, later this year.
 
Can somebody kindly forward me the details of an orthodontist in Perth.
 
Patient is in 018 edgewise Hilgers prescription
 
Thank you in advance
 
Chris Greeff
Centurion
South Africa
chris@icon.co.za
Date: Wed, 25 Oct 2000 09:54:13 -0400
From: "Barry H. Grayson" <barry.grayson@med.nyu.edu>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Surgical Orthodontic Fellowship 2001-2002
Message-ID: <4.3.2.7.2.20001025095254.00b7fee0@popmail.med.nyu.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"; format=flowed

Surgical / Orthodontic Fellowship at the
Institute of Reconstructive Plastic Surgery
New York University Medical Center

Applications are being accepted now for the 2001-2002 Fellowship Program
(June 15th 2001 - July 1, 2002)
  Program Description: This fellowship program provides a broad clinical
experience in the pre and post surgical orthodontic management of patients
undergoing craniofacial and orthognathic surgery. The twelve month hospital
based clinical program exposes the trainee to advanced techniques for the
evaluation and surgical/orthodontic correction of craniofacial and
orthognathic deformities.

The Fellow will gain hands on experience in the following areas:
1. 3D Computer graphic planning.
2. Pre and post surgical orthodontic treatment.
3. Surgical splint design and fabrication.
4. Operating room experience with splint insertion and fixation techniques.
5. Construction and management of presurgical orthopedic devices for the
rehabilitation of infants with clefts of the lip and palate.
6. Supervised clinical and laboratory research.
7. Distraction Osteogenesis, planning and pre/post distraction care
8. Participation on a Craniofacial Anomalies treatment team.
9. Participation on a Cleft Palate Treatment team.
10. Attendance at academic lectures, seminars, conferences in the
Department, Hospital and Medical Center Community.
Requirements:  The Applicant must be a graduate of a recognized
postgraduate orthodontic training program and be qualified to take the US
National Dental Boards. The latter requirement is essential  to obtain a
temporary dental license in NY State.
Application Process: Contact Dr. Barry H. Grayson
Tel. 212 263 5206 or
Fax 212 263 5400
e-mail <barry.grayson@med.nyu.edu>
Embedded Content: 13d0c78d.jpg: 00000001,5b5b2a63,00000000,00000000 Embedded Content: 13d0c819.jpg: 00000001,5b5b2a64,00000000,00000000 Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\align11.jpg" Attachment Converted: "C:\Program Files\UICNSKit\Eudora\Attach\align21.jpg"
                            ORTHOD-L Digest 734

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) ESCO - Membership Drive and Feedback request
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  3) Herbst
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
  4) Re: severe resorption
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  5) RE:Severe Resorption
        by "Darick Nordstrom" <darick@nordstromd.com>
  6) Re: Breakage revisited
        by Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
  7) Torque Springs
        by "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
  8) Re: Fee plans/listing/participating?
        by DrDCarter@aol.com
  9) Re: Dentoptix
        by MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
 10) agfa 1680 digital camera
        by "Dr. Chris Kesling" <Chris.Kesling@tportho.com>
 11) optimedia
        by KimMizrahi@aol.com
 12) RE: Photo Mounts
        by "William R. Hyman" <babbitecho@earthlink.net>
 13) Re: Invisalign
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
 14) Re: Invisalign
        by "Greg Nalchajian" <g.nalchajian.ortho@worldnet.att.net>
 15) ethics of invisalign
        by Orthodmd@aol.com
 16) FW: LINGUAL INDIRECT BONDING DENTAL LABORATORY
        by Briedenhann Joggie <jbried@joggie.com.na>
 17) interesting e-mail on invisalign from ortho patient-
        by "Dr. Chris Kesling" <Chris.Kesling@tportho.com>
 18) Invisalign for Limited Treatment
        by Dale Stocking <dstockin@inreach.com>
Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 11:03:34 -0800
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001103110334.007a7360@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

41





Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 11:34:54 -0800
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - Membership Drive and Feedback request
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001103113454.007a9230@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

November 3, 2000

Dear Colleagues:

Thank you for your confidence and your participation in discussions on
ESCO.  It is the contributions by members that make this study club
interesting for all of us.  Our membership, at over 3,500 worldwide, is the
largest for a service of this kind, but we would like to have even more
orthodontists online.  Please inform your colleagues of ESCO, and direct
them to our web-site for automatic subscription instructions:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm
Otherwise, colleagues can always email us for help at: orthodl@hsc.usc.edu

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics is now over 5 years old and we
are ready for an upgrade.  When we started out, most of our colleagues were
not fully equipped for email and web communication.  We would like to hear
your suggestions, comments, problems, etc, so that we may make ESCO an even
more interesting and productive experience for all of us.

Cheers,

Joe Zernik

Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 17:40:06 EST
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Herbst
Message-ID: <9a.b9c1179.2731f5c6@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Been using herbst for sometime. I belong to Oakstone medical's  online
literature review service. Most of the abstracts from the literature
review service are not very supportive of the Herbst appliance. Most
correction is dento-alveolar with a lot of mandibular incisor tipping.

Have any of you
Herbst user evaluated results?

David M. Lebsack DDS MS

Dear David,

I just spent the weekend with Rick McLaughlin of the San Diego McLaughlins
and, while he is not a Herbst user, we both agree that most of what
orthodontists do is dentoalveolar in nature.  I would love to assume that I
am a dentofacial orthopedist but other than palatal expansion, I can't be
sure of what happens other than moving teeth.  I wish it weren't so.

Warm regards

Charlie Ruff
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 19:52:17 -0500
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>, "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: severe resorption
Message-ID: <057001c04467$25c1ec00$43111918@paultower>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="gb2312"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Class III patients often have a thin alveolar process in the lower anterior
with prominent root contours. The orthodontic mechanics may have been enough
to stress the periodontium to the point of gingival stripping or recession,
especially if there was scant bone over the root surface. I have certainly
seen this before.  Plaque accumulation can compound the problem.
Subepithelial connective tissue grafting may give the best option for root
coverage.  The interdental papilla height will determine the chance of root
coverage.  These seem to have a better chance of root coverage and offer
better esthetics than the traditional free gingival graft.

Paul M. Thomas, DMD, MS
Adjunct Associate Professor
Orthodontics and Oral and
Maxillofacial Surgery
UNC School of Dentistry
Chapel Hill, NC

----- Original Message -----
From: "mylescao" <mylescao@grmc.gov.cn>
To: "ESCO" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2000 7:58 PM
Subject: severe resorption


> Dear group,
> A 15-yr old male came to my observation with a Class III malocclusion. All
> of his first premolars (4) were extracted. Placing the Edgewise appliance
> for 14 months, I have corrected his overbite. Last month he returned to me
> for a follow-up examination when I noticed something unusual. His labial
> gingiva began to resorb at the lower lateral incisor and canine (42 & 43)
> with the root exposed. The resorption became more severe in his third
visit
> last Tuesday. About half of the labial gingiva of 42 and 43 were found to
> expose and the teeth in question had no contact with the maxillary 22 and
> 23.
> Question 1: why is there such resorption of the gingiva of 42 and 43? And
in
> such a degree?
> Question 2: what is my next move to tackle the problem best?
> I appreciate all your comments.
>
> Silvia Zhou (Ms.)
> Orthodontist
> CHINA
>
>
>

Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 23:46:21 -0800
From: "Darick Nordstrom" <darick@nordstromd.com>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: RE:Severe Resorption
Message-ID: <LOBBIGKBIBJJCIHOGNFIKEGACDAA.darick@nordstromd.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain;
        charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

The lower anterior alveolus of most Class III patients is very thin
(labio-lingually), and gets thinner if the teeth are extruded to close the
bite (see articl in AJO/DO a few years ago in issue focused on iatrogenics).

It is also possible that the upper anteriors are begining to relapse against
the lowers, and / or the patient has a face-sleeping habit.

It would be prudent to begin by decoupling the anteriors. Take xrays of the
anteriors to look for resorption ... if none, note that anterior teeth are
not lost due to labial bone loos, but interproximal.

Gingival grafting (either free or using cadaver tisue) may help cover the
roots if you act soon enough, and there is enough blood / nutrient supply
available.

I wonder if there is a Wilcodontics practitioner out there that has dealt
with this.

Darick Nordstrom, DDS

Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 08:26:33 +1100
From: Barry Mollenhauer <barrym@netspace.net.au>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Breakage revisited
Message-ID: <4.3.1.2.20001102164548.00d85980@pop.netspace.net.au>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
        boundary="=====================_574514==_.ALT"

Hi,
At 11:46 AM 25/10/00 -0400, Andre wrote:
>Barry wrote:
>>How old was the wire, since hydrogen embrittlement is very real with old stock (>4 years) >>especially if not sealed away from water vapor?
 >My question is: Is there literature on this specific subject?

It may not be in the formal literature, but it is in orthodontic folklore, newsletters and metallurgical literature. I came across it originally when doing clinical R&D on the alpha titanium wire produced by A.J.Wilcock P/L (Aust). Stop reading now if you get bored easily!!

One of my observations about 1985 was that this wire seemed to "heat treat" itself in the mouth as chrome cobalt wires do in a furnace, welder horns, etc. But since it was a gradual hardening over a number of months, it seemed ideal for clinical use. So A.J.Wilcock took a patent out on it and went into the matter. It seemed that their wire (a near alpha titanium) took up hydrogen from the saliva to form titanium hydrides. This would explain the changes. [Totally off at a tangent, this hydrogen entrapment in titanium is being considered as a future means of energy for engines (e.g automobiles) when fossil fuels run low.]

It was then noted that the hardening effect of the archwires was different in different mouths. A Japanese team subsequently confirmed this variability. More recently, with different manufacturing processes, it has become obvious that this wire "grows" in some mouths, which means that a .016x.022" enlarges to fill the .018x.025" slot. It makes it "sticky" to remove after being in the mouth for a number of months. [On another tangent, it is a gentler wire than beta titanium and more easily formed, hence I have used it for years as a finishing wire.]

Anyway, having become aware of changes in this metal due to hydrogen, it became obvious that stainless steel ligatures also became brittle in some mouths. The key word seems to be "some". Remember Goethe "We only see what we know". So on questioning, I learnt of hydrogen embrittlement of stainless steel.

Andre, this possible lack of info on embrittlement in our literature parallels the corrosion of metals due to microbial attack. I wrote a letter to the editor of the AOJ on this in the early 1990s. Much of that information was gleaned from aviation engineering literature. But Matasa has written on it in his newsletter more recently. Metallurgical creep (histeresis) is another phenomenon that is conspicuous by its absence in the literature, but may be discussed at courses.  

>Good idea but why should we compensate for the patient's inability to be compliant?

It is actually a good idea to compensate -- for PR purposes. This is why I use fixed Jumpers. The parents love you for it when they have been harassed by us (orthodontists and our staff) for a previous sibling who was non-compliant with headgear or elastics. Remember that the mothers of these children are often harassed by their school teachers, music teachers, camp leaders, etc. So to have someone who will take responsibility, is very much appreciated.

>The intent of my original thread was to begin a discussion on general compliance and how parents >and patients will lie to avoid admitting that they have done something wrong.

Since this is not really covered scientifically in the orthodontic literature, maybe this is where the art of orthodontics comes in to fill in the gaps. And possibly the art of orthodontics includes a similar definition to 'insight', namely, 'the ability to reach tenable conclusions from insufficient data'. On a few occasions it has taken 20 years to determine the etiology of constant breakage. This happened when a former patient came back with her own offspring and volunteered that this child would not pick at the appliance with a fork as she herself did!! These second generation kids are perfect patients because the poor things cannot even get away with white lies, let alone whoppers (e.g. "The seeds in the banana broke it").

Most studies in the medical literature show that all that can be expected is 30% compliance (e.g. pill taking). That is frightening until it is realized that compliance is much better in a private orthodontic office... phew. Well, at least in my private office it is, compared to the public institution I worked in for one half day a week for thirty years. Among other things, I put the difference down to my supportive staff. So you are right, it is not only our ethics, but staff ethics and patient/parents ethics that come into play. However, the most insidious is third party ethics.



Regards,
Barry

Dr B. Mollenhauer      Fax: 61-3-9499 5771
Orthodontist             Tel: 61-3-9499 3812 (Business hours)
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 06:11:26 -0500
From: "Ron Parsons" <ronparsons@mindspring.com>
To: "USC Orthodontic Study Club" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Torque Springs
Message-ID: <011101c043f4$7a2e26a0$cf065a18@gw.totalweb.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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Please tell me how to apply (connect to the arch wire) RMO's torque springs?  Thank you.
 
Ron Parsons
 
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 17:11:49 EST
From: DrDCarter@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Fee plans/listing/participating?
Message-ID: <36.d7e2f97.273340a5@aol.com>
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Dear group

It is not against any law to discuss the philosophy of fee as an integral
part of providing excellent healthcare

I do not/ have not /will not belong to any plan including the "dentists" plan
(which is not)

One very simple reason was stated in the last posting which related to time
as a factor in fee. 

Time based fee structures are a holdover of the industrial age.  A person's
work was limited by physical strength and endurance, and his/her output was
really a measure of horsepower, therefore it made sense to pay for his/her
services based on the length of time input which was a crude measure of work
(effort X time + work).  This may be an industrial origin of pay inequality
for men vs women, since males are generally stronger physically, again an
industrial "horespower" concept.  Based on this philosophy, one should be
paid more for working longer hours.  If this sound like a union philosophy,
it is.  The problem with this is the lack of consideration for output. In the
postindustrial age, one person, aided by others and/or machines, can output
far more "work" in far less time.  So, what is to be valued, A. the time, or,
B. the work output?

I value the end product.  If a Microsoft or Oracle team writes a program
which adds value to an office, and sells it for $100, and makes a profit of
$10, some would call that good business.  If they capture a larger audience,
and sell millions of copies, and their profit rises to $50, some would say
"astute businesspeople".  Others woiuld say "corporate greed" and use the
argument that it took no more (brain) work to provide one copy or a million,
so the company should only be compensated for the additional labor (time
again) to make additional copies.

One philosophy is an antiquated union argument based on industrial values
A more compelling philosophy is based on excellence, on quality, on doing the
very best one can do for each individual, and setting a fee based on the
value of the service.

Let's bring this around to dentistry.  If a company selling orthodontic
appliances suggests fees be based on time, then the longer it takes, the
higher the fee.  At first this sounds reasonable, but it fails to account for
the true overhead in individual offices which is derived from the fixed costs
of being in business, plus the number of times clients are served, plus the
variable costs of materials, etc.  Practice A may provide an excellent
service in 18 months with 24 actual appointments while practice B may provide
an also excellent service in 30 months with 24 actual appointments. 
According to the union philosophy, the practice which spent the longest
length oif time should charge more, while the practice which finished first,
same quality, should charge less.

According to my own personal philosophy, the last statement is backwards. 
The one who finished first, same quality, should place a higher value on her
service!  I know most patients would agree.  And, what about the third
practice which finished in 12 months with a less desirable result?  Worth
less, because the value of the service is less even if it was fast.  So time
itself is an industrial concept relegated to union workers who punch time
clocks, and attorneys who work 48 billable hours per day ("it all depends on
what bllable hours is...").
The concept of charging for time encourages a prolonged course of work.  This
is probably why lawsuits drag on so long.  Philosophically, lawyers are
committed to stretching a case as far as it will stretch.

One should ruminate on this and discuss the ideas with staff, because staff
presents most fees.  If they are not comfortable with your fees, even proud
of them, they won't present your values.

I hope some innovative companies see the error of encouraging time based fees
when they have exciting, compelling, innovative products which provide
services that patients value and do not divide by hours or days.

Dick Carter
Portland OR USA

Date: Tue, 31 Oct 2000 22:45:30 -0500
From: MDLhome <mdlively@adelphia.net>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Re: Dentoptix
Message-ID: <39FF91DA.A7A87B80@adelphia.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
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Hi Ron:

Thanks so much for the info.  I am going to visit your site tonight and will
email you with any other questions I may have.

Thanks again,

Mark


WRed852509@cs.com wrote:

> Hi Mark,
> Kodak has a new printer that prints on a blue film material and the result
> looks like an x-ray.  The new printer costs arounfd $900.  The Codonics
> printer which uses a dye-sublimation process and produces a beautiful
> printed x-ray on blue film costs $12,000.  There is a tremendous difference
> in price and quality of result, but when presented with both x-rays, most
> orthodontists would pick the Kodak printer and product.
>
> You may want to convert you digital image database to a website that allows
> limited access by referring professionals.  If you would like to try our
> site, username is test and password is test and the website is
> www.redmondorthodontics.com
> If you are interested in the program used to develope the site, it is called
> alchemy and is used to convert a large .tif file to a smaller .jpg file.
> Please contact me if you would like additional info.
> Good Luck,
> Ron Redmond

--

Mark David Lively, DMD
mdlively@adelphia.net

Lively Orthodontics, P.A.
106 N. Colorado Avenue
Stuart,  FL  34990


Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 14:08:15 -0600
From: "Dr. Chris Kesling" <Chris.Kesling@tportho.com>
To: "Orthod-L@Usc. Edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: agfa 1680 digital camera
Message-ID: <NEBBLMCKCJCJLABNKCKDAEKHCEAA.Chris.Kesling@tportho.com>

Does anyone out there have any experience with the agfa 1680 digital camera
for all round clinical use.  I have given up on our old fuji ds-330(never
could get it to work!!)  I have been told that the agfa 1680 is a good
camera-- they claim it is as easy to use as old Fuji 220.  Any comments
would be appreciated.  Thanks!
Sincerely,
Chris Kesling


Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 18:10:04 EST
From: KimMizrahi@aol.com
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: optimedia
Message-ID: <57.d1887ac.2731fccc@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
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The CD Rom discs on the journals mentioned were produced by Optimedia based
in Tel Aviv, Israel. You can get their address from Dr Zeev Abraham, 147
Arlosorov Street. Tel Aviv, 62995. Israel.  Tel No ++(0)3 695 9550.

Sincerely.

Kim Mizrahi
Orthodontist
128 Woodford Avenue,
Gants Hill
Essex
IG2 6XA.
England
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 07:36:32 -0800
From: "William R. Hyman" <babbitecho@earthlink.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Cc: <HeyScoobie@aol.com>
Subject: RE: Photo Mounts
Message-ID: <JMEKJAADNIBBPPDDKEEJKEIJCAAA.babbitecho@earthlink.net>
MIME-Version: 1.0
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I use "Richard Conner Co." for photo & X-ray mounts (307-237-2646). I have
gotten them through "P&G Products" (714-336-3671) in the past. Although it
has been a long time since I've used P&G. Consider going digital, it will
eliminate the need for special mounts and save you a lot of time in the
mounting process. Bill H.

Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 20:04:40 -0500
From: "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
To: "Barry Raphael" <baronlin@concentric.net>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <059701c04468$e11ee600$43111918@paultower>
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Barry,

As long as you do the informed consent as you mention, then I say it's her
choice.  Leave a paper trail of documentation in case she becomes
disenchanted.  You could say the same about the class II patient who is
beyond camouflage yet refuses surgery.  As long as they are fully informed,
I have no trouble offering treatment.

    -=Paul=-

Paul M. Thomas


----- Original Message -----
From: "Barry Raphael" <baronlin@concentric.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2000 7:53 PM
Subject: Re: Invisalign


> I am an Invisalign practioner. I've spoken in favor of the appliance in
this
> arena before.  Most cases are going well.  I still have good things to
say.
>
> But I need help on this one: an ethical issue that I think will become
more
> prevalent as we use the appliance more.  Here's the case.
> 25 y/o female. Beautiful - like Janet Jackson. "Hates" the way the upper
> central is turned and "Hates" the crowded lower incisors.
>
> Now get this: Overjet is 9mm, molars full Class II.  With gentle probing,
I
> find that 1)She is not concerned with the protrusion of the upper
incisors,
> 2) She is not concerned at all about the overjet, and 3) There is "No way"
> that she will wear braces.  He job is "too demanding" and she does not
want
> to be seen in braces (OK boys, don't get your bristles up. That IS who the
> advertising is aiming at, after all).
>
> The question is: Do I do the Invisalign to satisfy the patient's chief
> concern , or do I say that your case is not suitable for Invisalign? Do I
do
> the Invisalign case EVEN IF  I give a full informed consent about the
> limitations of the treatment, the risks of leaving a Class II
malocclusion,
> the impact of long term stability, AND the caveat that fixed appliances
will
> be needed in the event she is not satisfied with the results?  Because I
am
> sure I could get this lady to sign on the dotted line if she thought she
> could get that incisor in line without braces.
>
> Perhaps we face the same quandries with fixed appliances too when there
are
> legitimate options (ideal vs compensation, x vs non-x, surg, and so on).
>
> The decision is easy when I can see the compromise may cause harm, or may
> eliminate a more ideal therapy in the future.
>
> But when the treatment seems quite harmless, or I know that I can always
> resort to the proper treatment if it becomes indicated, the decision lines
> become blurry.
>
> And this is where Invisalign is going to present the greatest challenge.
> Deciding which cases to do, and which to pass on.
>
> Any comments?
>
> Barry Raphael
> Clifton, NJ
>
>

Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 22:37:00 -0800
From: "Greg Nalchajian" <g.nalchajian.ortho@worldnet.att.net>
To: "Barry Raphael" <baronlin@concentric.net>, <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Re: Invisalign
Message-ID: <006501c04497$6c346f20$8405480c@thiscomputer>
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Barry,

Seems to me you have two hurdles to overcome.

First, will her case be accepted by Invisalign for treatment? From what I
have heard them say, and I'm sure you have more experience than I in this
area, any case outside the "selected criteria" will be turned back as
unacceptable.

Second, how would you approach her case differently if she were interested
in braces? An adult with 9 mm of overjet would present significant hurdles
for correction regardless of the technique. What if surgery were not an
option either medically or financially? If she were still interested in
orthodontic alignment only as a treatment option utilizing braces, what
would you do? Each practicioner needs to determine whether or not they would
accept this case and treat it to a "non-ideal" result in spite of the risks.

I don't think that this is an Invisalign dilemma. It is an individual
practicioner's battle to justify a decision to improve the esthetics of a
patient's teeth without idealizing their occlusion. How does this differ
from the post-orthodontic patient with alignment relapse of their upper
incisors, who happens to present with an open bite after treatment? Do you
re-treat the upper teeth and leave the bite open? If you perceive that
straightening the anterior teeth with Invisalign is "quite harmless", how
does this differ from partial anterior braces doing the same? Don't we face
the same risks with either technique?

Ultimately, it is the practicioner and not the technique that must make
these calls.

Greg Nalchajian
Fresno CA

----- Original Message -----
From: Barry Raphael <baronlin@concentric.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Sent: Thursday, October 26, 2000 4:53 PM
Subject: Re: Invisalign


> I am an Invisalign practioner. I've spoken in favor of the appliance in
this
> arena before.  Most cases are going well.  I still have good things to
say.
>
> But I need help on this one: an ethical issue that I think will become
more
> prevalent as we use the appliance more.  Here's the case.
> 25 y/o female. Beautiful - like Janet Jackson. "Hates" the way the upper
> central is turned and "Hates" the crowded lower incisors.
>
> Now get this: Overjet is 9mm, molars full Class II.  With gentle probing,
I
> find that 1)She is not concerned with the protrusion of the upper
incisors,
> 2) She is not concerned at all about the overjet, and 3) There is "No way"
> that she will wear braces.  He job is "too demanding" and she does not
want
> to be seen in braces (OK boys, don't get your bristles up. That IS who the
> advertising is aiming at, after all).
>
> The question is: Do I do the Invisalign to satisfy the patient's chief
> concern , or do I say that your case is not suitable for Invisalign? Do I
do
> the Invisalign case EVEN IF  I give a full informed consent about the
> limitations of the treatment, the risks of leaving a Class II
malocclusion,
> the impact of long term stability, AND the caveat that fixed appliances
will
> be needed in the event she is not satisfied with the results?  Because I
am
> sure I could get this lady to sign on the dotted line if she thought she
> could get that incisor in line without braces.
>
> Perhaps we face the same quandries with fixed appliances too when there
are
> legitimate options (ideal vs compensation, x vs non-x, surg, and so on).
>
> The decision is easy when I can see the compromise may cause harm, or may
> eliminate a more ideal therapy in the future.
>
> But when the treatment seems quite harmless, or I know that I can always
> resort to the proper treatment if it becomes indicated, the decision lines
> become blurry.
>
> And this is where Invisalign is going to present the greatest challenge.
> Deciding which cases to do, and which to pass on.
>
> Any comments?
>
> Barry Raphael
> Clifton, NJ
>
>

Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 20:55:51 EST
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: ethics of invisalign
Message-ID: <32.c206668.273223a7@aol.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

I am an Invisalign practioner. I've spoken in favor of the appliance in this
arena before.  Most cases are going well.  I still have good things to say.

But I need help on this one: an ethical issue that I think will become more
prevalent as we use the appliance more.  Here's the case.
25 y/o female. Beautiful - like Janet Jackson. "Hates" the way the upper
central is turned and "Hates" the crowded lower incisors.

Now get this: Overjet is 9mm, molars full Class II.  With gentle probing, I
find that 1)She is not concerned with the protrusion of the upper incisors,
2) She is not concerned at all about the overjet, and 3) There is "No way"
that she will wear braces.  He job is "too demanding" and she does not want
to be seen in braces (OK boys, don't get your bristles up. That IS who the
advertising is aiming at, after all).

The question is: Do I do the Invisalign to satisfy the patient's chief
concern , or do I say that your case is not suitable for Invisalign? Do I do
the Invisalign case EVEN IF  I give a full informed consent about the
limitations of the treatment, the risks of leaving a Class II malocclusion,
the impact of long term stability, AND the caveat that fixed appliances will
be needed in the event she is not satisfied with the results?  Because I am
sure I could get this lady to sign on the dotted line if she thought she
could get that incisor in line without braces.

Perhaps we face the same quandries with fixed appliances too when there are
legitimate options (ideal vs compensation, x vs non-x, surg, and so on).

The decision is easy when I can see the compromise may cause harm, or may
eliminate a more ideal therapy in the future.

But when the treatment seems quite harmless, or I know that I can always
resort to the proper treatment if it becomes indicated, the decision lines
become blurry.

And this is where Invisalign is going to present the greatest challenge.
Deciding which cases to do, and which to pass on.

Any comments?

Barry Raphael
Clifton, NJ


Dear Barry,

I don't beleive this is much if any type of ethics question at all.  It seems
to me it would be a horse of a different color if for instance a mother
brought a young person in who was brachycephalic and who had lower crowding. 
After explaining to the parent that treatment would have to involve a
nonextraction approach in the lower arch because of the skeletal deep bite,
she said that was all good and well but just take the teeth out will ya doc? 
Taking the teeth out without regard for the consequences is an ethics
question.

Taking a patient who is full class II, leaving them with straighter teeth but
still class II does not seem to involve ethics at all.  As long as they
understand  the stability issue, then I think you have informed them of their
choices.

I really think the issue becomes one of ethics when I see an adult treated to
a lack of anterior guidance (class II, openbite, etc) and told they will need
long term retention for stability and then the adult is given upper and lower
Hawley retainers and told to wear them forever.  Can you say, "How hard can I
make retention?" 

I don't think you have an ethics issue at all.

Charlie Ruff
Date: Fri, 3 Nov 2000 10:42:34 +0200
From: Briedenhann Joggie <jbried@joggie.com.na>
To: "'BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb'" <BILAKO@cyberia.net.lb>
Cc: "'ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU'" <ORTHOD-L@USC.EDU>
Subject: FW: LINGUAL INDIRECT BONDING DENTAL LABORATORY
Message-ID: <18D6D1F1F6DBD311921000805F71492A05BEAA@unknown.IAFRICA.NET>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain



> -----Original Message-----
> From: Megaw Ryan
> Sent: Friday, November 03, 2000 10:24 AM
> To:   Briedenhann Joggie
> Subject:      LINGUAL INDIRECT BONDING DENTAL LABORATORY
>
> Dr Joggie Briedenhann
> P.O. Box 40257
> Ausspannplatz, Windhoek
> Namibia
>
> 10 Dr A.B. May street
> Ausspannplatz, Windhoek
> Namibia
>
> Tel: (Intl code) - (61) - 231167
> Fax: (Intl code) - (61) - 221591
> Cell phone: (Intl code) - 811293119
> e-mail: joggie@iafrica.com
>
> Dear Dr Bilal Koleilat
>
> I received an e-mail which was forwarded to us by Dr George Thomadakis
> (Sandton, South Africa) in which you requested the contact details of an
> Orthodontic Dental Laboratory which performs lingual set ups. Our dental
> laboratory provides a comprehensive service, specializing in Lingual
> Indirect Bonding. We use the Dali 2 program, by Dr Fillion, for archwire
> bending as well as the modified Targ system. Our service also includes
> class set-ups.
>
> Should you have any further queries, please do not hesitate in contacting
> Dr Joggie Briedenhann at the above mentioned address. We look forward to
> hearing from you.
>
> Yours Faithfully
> Ryan Megaw (on behalf of Dr Joggie Briedenhann)
>   
Date: Thu, 2 Nov 2000 13:11:16 -0600
From: "Dr. Chris Kesling" <Chris.Kesling@tportho.com>
To: "Orthod-L@Usc. Edu" <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: interesting e-mail on invisalign from ortho patient-
Message-ID: <NEBBLMCKCJCJLABNKCKDIEKKCEAA.Chris.Kesling@tportho.com>


The following exchange recently occured on one of our websites regarding
invisalign.  Yes I do have a financial interest with TP Orthodontics but as
an orthodontist I feel that others might be interested in potential feelings
of our adult patients regarding the ads they are running.  I am not pro or
con invisalign-- after all they quote my grandfather in their product
literature!
Chris Kesling

_______________________________________________________________

Dear Martin Czebotar,

The website Braces4u.net is in no way affiliated with the Invisalign website
or the company Align Technology, Inc. or its products. Braces4u was designed
to enhance awareness about MXi, a ceramic bracket being used today to treat
patients as an alternative to metal braces. Trusted by orthodontists
worldwide, MXi braces have been successful in providing long lasting
orthodontic results using "Traditional" orthodontic treatment methods.

Additionally, the advertisements which you have referred to on TV are in no
way connected to Braces4u. However, if you would like to extend your
comments onto the Invisalign visitor's guestbook here is their website
address http://www.invisalign.com

Congratulations on surviving your recent orthodontic treatment and I hope
you enjoy your new smile soon.

Sincerely,
Laura Anderson -- Web Editor
TP Orthodontics, Inc.
Email ~  landerson@tportho.com





To:     landerson@tportho.com
cc:

Subject:


---------------------- Forwarded by Laura M Anderson/TP Orthodontics on
11/01/2000 08:13 AM ---------------------------
Please respond to "martin czebotar" <smczebotar@earthlink.net>
To:     info@braces4u.net
cc:     (bcc: Info/TP Orthodontics)

Subject:



Having braces as an adult was painful and humiliating.  I am almost done
with treatment and it was pure hell.  The invisiline ads on TV which
depict the person with the metal braces as an undesirable dork have
exacerbated my humiliation when I am forced to view them in a group
context. I wonder what the public reaction would be to an adverstisement
for breast reconstruction which has a man saying "The woman I am meeting
only has one breast" and then snubbing the one breasted woman when she
appears.The invisilne blind date ad which depicts the woman stating that
she is there to meet a guy with braces and she is expecting a mouth full
of metal is just as offensive to people with braces.  It depicts us as
ugly and undesirable.  I am glad I will soon be rid of this stigma.  My
treatment was successful and will end in about 6 weeks.  I have served
my time in "metal hell".  I just wish I could inflict the same trauma on
the marketers for invisiline.  They are insensitive and if you endorse
their product so are you.  I have called the 800 line for invisiline and
was promised a manager would call me back but noone has.  It does not
surprise me.
 - att1.htm




Date: Wed, 01 Nov 2000 18:00:59 -0800
From: Dale Stocking <dstockin@inreach.com>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: Invisalign for Limited Treatment
Message-ID: <3A00CADB.2D053460@inreach.com>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
 boundary="------------E0043C95D5A3D18CF2906286"

Re: ORTHOD-L digest 733

I agree with Barry Raphael and the question he poses on the use of Invisalign for "limited treatment."  I feel he has stated a very rational approach to limited treatment selection and it applies to all types of appliances.  I am just beginning to use Invisalign with two cases started, my wife and my practice manager.  So far, I feel good about what Invisalign has to offer and we have had a positive response from parents of patients and other adults.

In Dr. Raphael's next to the last paragraph, he mentions "proper treatment."  "Proper treatment" is a concept with which I have difficulty.  When first out of school, it was simple, I tried to attain what I was taught.  As I developed my own clinical experience and was exposed to ideas and techniques not learned in school, my concept of "proper treatment" changed.  Today, I feel that "proper treatment" is what a patient and practitioner, together, arrive at after going through a diagnosis and case work-up.

Yes, the TV ads could have been done differently; however, Invisalign is not threatening the end of fixed appliance therapy.  And yes, the newspaper article had a poor choice of words for fix appliance therapy, but on a whole, it presented a typical daily newspaper feature on something new.  That same article ran in our local paper and people I talked to thought is was pretty balanced.

To adress Dr Raphael's question, I think "compromise, limited, and various-other-terms treatment" is very "proper" when arrived at through a complete process.  I feel that Invisilign could be just as valid a treatmnt modality as fixed or removables for this type of treatment.

Dale E. Stocking
Stockton, Calif.
 
 

Subject: Re: Invisalign
Date: Thu, 26 Oct 2000 20:53:45 -0400
From: "Barry Raphael" <baronlin@concentric.net>
To: <orthod-l@usc.edu>
I am an Invisalign practioner. I've spoken in favor of the appliance
in this
arena before.  Most cases are going well.  I still have good
things to say.

But I need help on this one: an ethical issue that I think will become
more
prevalent as we use the appliance more.  Here's the case.
25 y/o female. Beautiful - like Janet Jackson. "Hates" the way
the upper
central is turned and "Hates" the crowded lower incisors.

Now get this: Overjet is 9mm, molars full Class II.  With gentle
probing, I
find that 1)She is not concerned with the protrusion of the upper
incisors,
2) She is not concerned at all about the overjet, and 3) There is
"No way"
that she will wear braces.  He job is "too demanding" and
she does not want
to be seen in braces (OK boys, don't get your bristles up. That IS who
the
advertising is aiming at, after all).

The question is: Do I do the Invisalign to satisfy the patient's chief
concern , or do I say that your case is not suitable for Invisalign? Do I
do
the Invisalign case EVEN IF  I give a full informed consent about
the
limitations of the treatment, the risks of leaving a Class II
malocclusion,
the impact of long term stability, AND the caveat that fixed appliances
will
be needed in the event she is not satisfied with the results? 
Because I am
sure I could get this lady to sign on the dotted line if she thought 
she
could get that incisor in line without braces.

Perhaps we face the same quandries with fixed appliances too when there
are
legitimate options (ideal vs compensation, x vs non-x, surg, and so 
on).

The decision is easy when I can see the compromise may cause harm, or
may
eliminate a more ideal therapy in the future.

But when the treatment seems quite harmless, or I know that I can 
always
resort to the proper treatment if it becomes indicated, the decision
lines
become blurry.

And this is where Invisalign is going to present the greatest 
challenge.
Deciding which cases to do, and which to pass on.

Any comments?

Barry Raphael
Clifton,
NJ

                            ORTHOD-L Digest 735

Topics covered in this issue include:

  1) ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
        by Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
  2) Crohn's Diesease
        by Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
  3) re: Herbst Appliance
        by "Dr. Wolfgang Schulz" <wschulz@w-4.de> (by way of Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>)
  4) herbst/bionator/ mandibular growth
        by Rodrigo Frizzo Viecilli <philox@zaz.com.br>
  5) RE: Herbst
        by "Leon Verhagen" <lamverhagen@interestate.nl>
  6) Re: Herbst
        by "Paul M. Thomas" <pm.thomas@gte.net>
  7) Breakage - The saga continues
        by =?iso-8859-1?Q?Andr=E9_Ruest?= <aruest@compuserve.com>
  8) Re: Oral Breath
        by "prasanna_r" <prasanna_r@satyam.net.in>
  9) Re: ORTHOD-L digest 734
        by "Tim and Debbie Alford" <tja3819@netdirect.net>
 10) Re: Dentoptix
        by "prasanna_r" <prasanna_r@satyam.net.in>
 11) Align Technologies' silence on Doctors' message boards
        by "Stanley M. Sokolow" <overbyte@earthlink.net>
 12) Orthodontist in Prague, Czech Republic
        by Paul Schneider <pschneid@bigpond.net.au>
Date: Wed, 08 Nov 2000 12:53:50 -0800
From: Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: ESCO - The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001108125350.007ffd70@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"




Dear Colleague:

The Electronic Study Club for Orthodontics (ESCO) is a free forum for
exchange of information and opinions among orthodontists, and for
distribution of professional information. 

* What information can you get on ESCO?

* How to subscribe to ESCO?

* How to change your address?

* How to post messages on ESCO?

For answers to these questions and more, please check our web site:
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/eclub.htm

Enjoy!

Sincerely,

Joseph H. Zernik, D.M.D. Ph.D.
Professor, Department of Orthodontics
University of Southern California
http://www-hsc.usc.edu/~jzernik/

42





Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 22:26:51 -0500
From: Ted Schipper <ted.schipper@utoronto.ca>
To: Orthodontic List <orthod-l@usc.edu>
Subject: Crohn's Diesease
Message-ID: <3A0381FB.CC9A2CBE@utoronto.ca>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 7bit

Does anybody have any experience treating a young (age 12, female)
patient(s) who have Crohn's Disease? Also, many of these patient are on
prednizone. Apparently both the condition and the medication have an
inhibitory effect on bone growth. Has anyone noticed any difference in
these patients with regard to tooth movement? Any other differences?
Thanks, TGS.

Date: Fri, 03 Nov 2000 11:48:37 -0800
From: "Dr. Wolfgang Schulz" <wschulz@w-4.de> (by way of Joseph Zernik <orthodl@hsc.usc.edu>)
To: ORTHOD-L@usc.edu
Subject: re: Herbst Appliance
Message-ID: <3.0.6.32.20001103114837.007f8130@hsc.usc.edu>
Mime-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: 8bit

There are two orthodontists in Würzburg, Germany, using the HA in
late-growth-periods and report of very less dental effects. Please contact
them:
e-mail: kfo-richter@t-online.de
Internet: http://www.kfo-richter.de

Dr.med.dent. Wolfgang Schulz
Orthodontist,
Tettnang, Lake of Constance, Germany


Date: Sat, 04 Nov 2000 14:05:57 -0200
From: Rodrigo Frizzo Viecilli <philox@zaz.com.br>
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Subject: herbst/bionator/ mandibular growth
Message-ID: <3A0433E5.AFE50761@zaz.com.br>
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;
 boundary="------------7A2B3DC1217BEE9666F2F22E"

I personally don't like the Herbst appliance for 3 reasons:
1) incisor tipping/ dento-alveolar protrusion/tipping in the upper molars
2) discomfort of the patient
3) I think the Bionator lets the patient bring the jaw back and forward to its correct position, than this appliance is more physiological. In theory, I believe this come and go movement gives the condyle more stimulation for growth.

    All we know there are problems concerning the effectiveness of the Bionator, but we use ATM tomographies and occlusal splint to check if there was only a repositioning or effective growth.
    We always try to avoid surgery, that's why we always try the Bionator, at least to say you have tried something, while people keep researching. We don't have any case of TMJD after the use of Bionator until today.
    The cases that show better response are the ones of meso or braqui patients and with favorable growth direction. But we got good results in some dolico patients too. Some patients need a genioplasty after using it, but most don't choose this option and are satisfied with their profile.
    I can't prove if our good results are natural or we have an increment of growth because of the appliance. In my opinion, the appliance works with most of the patients that really use it.
    I think when most people use commonly a cervical facebow in the growth phase , the tendency of opening the bite in some patients is minimized by the growth of the condyle and I think it is a process similar in condyle results to the Bionator system ( of course the objectives are different). We see in some of this patients a modification in FMA and not in the Y axis, for example. I think that's why we don't see the AFAI increase in some kids that use it, we see more in older patients. We don't use the cervical headgear a lot, we  prefer the IHG, because there is more control of the direction of the force in the appliance and molar movement.
    In my opinion most of our changes are really dentoalveolar. This is the opinion of almost all the orthodontic researchers nowadays. But if we have doubts, they should be viewed in the side of benefit for the patient.

Dr. Rodrigo Viecilli/ Dr. Orlando Viecilli
Canoas-RS/  Brazil
 



Subject: Herbst
Date: Wed, 1 Nov 2000 17:40:06 EST
From: Orthodmd@aol.com
To: orthod-l@usc.edu
Been using herbst for sometime. I belong to Oakstone medical's  online
literature review service. Most of the abstracts from the literature
review service are not very supportive of the Herbst appliance. Most
correction is dento-alveolar with a lot of mandibular incisor tipping.

Have any of you
Herbst user evaluated results?

David M. Lebsack DDS MS

Dear David,

I just spent the weekend with Rick McLaughlin of the San Diego McLaughlins
and, while he is not a Herbst user, we both agree that most of what
orthodontists do is dentoalveolar in nature.  I would love to assume that I
am a dentofacial orthopedist but ot