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GLRSN Burden Document (Aug 08) download Resource
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GLRSN Burden Report presentation (Aug 08) download Resource

GLRSN Burden Talking points (Aug 08) download Resource

Stroke Atlas (Mar 08) download Resource

Illinois Fact Sheet (Dec 08) download Resource
Indiana Fact Sheet download Resource
Michigan Fact Sheet download Resource
Minnesota Fact Sheet download Resource
Ohio Fact Sheet (Dec 08) download Resource
Wisconsin Fact Sheet (Dec 08) download Resource
Stroke Risk Factors Fact Sheet download Resource

 

GLR Stroke Prevalence by State

bullet In 2006, Ohio and Michigan recorded the highest stroke prevalence in the Great Lakes region (2.9%); lower rates were reported by Indiana (2.7%), Wisconsin (2.4%) and Illinois (2.2%); and the lowest by Minnesota (1.9%) [1] .

bullet When compared to the rest of the region, some states also recorded a greater change of stroke prevalence from year to year: for example, only during 2005-2006, in Illinois, the prevalence decreased to 2.2 % in 2006 (from 2.9 % in 2005), while in Ohio, it increased to 2.9% in 2006 (from 2.4% in 2005) [2] .


[1] Self-reported stroke, adults 18 years and older, using 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey methodology.
[2] Self-reported stroke, adults 18 years and older, using 2005 BRFSS and 2006 BRFSS survey methodology.

GLR Stroke by Race

bullet The stroke prevalence was higher in blacks living in four GL states: Ohio (4.9%); Illinois (4.1%); and Indiana and Michigan (3.1%), compared to the nation (3.0%) [1].
bullet The stroke prevalence was higher in whites living in Michigan (2.9%) and Indiana (2.7%) compared to the nation (2.6%); and higher in Hispanics living in Ohio (2.7%) compared to the nation (1.5%) [1].


[1] Self-reported stroke, adults 18 years and older, using 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey methodology.

GLR Stroke by Gender

bullet In some GL states the prevalence of stroke was greater than the national level for men (2.7%) and for women (2.7%): for men in Michigan (2.9%) and Ohio (2.8%); and, for women, in Michigan and Ohio (3.0%), followed by Indiana (2.8%) [1].


[1] Self-reported stroke, adults 18 years and older, using 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey methodology.

GLR Stroke by Age

bullet More persons 65 years of age and older reported one or more stroke events if living in Michigan (8.6%), Ohio (8.8%) and Illinois (8.9%) than in the other states and in the nation. Indiana reported the same prevalence as the nationís (8.5%) [1].

bullet Adults in GLR also reported more strokes than in the nation if in the following age-groups and states:
o 18-24 and living in Wisconsin;
o 25-34 living in Ohio, Indiana, Michigan and Wisconsin;
o 35-44 living in Michigan and Minnesota;
o 45-54 living in Indiana and Ohio; and
o 55-64 living in Michigan (5.2%) and Indiana (4.2%) compared to living in the nation (3.9%) [1].


[1] Self-reported stroke, adults 18 years and older, using 2006 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) survey methodology.

Increasing Stroke Awareness/Action

bullet More people reported sudden numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, as a stroke warning sign, than any other stroke symptom [1].
[1] BRFSS survey methodology, reported by states in 2005 and 2006 (note, Michigan used different methodology)

Facts about Stroke Risk Factors

bullet Having one or more of certain health conditions (such as obesity/being overweight, high cholesterol, diabetes, and hypertension) increases the risk of stroke [1], [2].
bullet Being a smoker, eating less-than-5 vegetable servings per day, and reporting no physical activity in the past month also increases the risk of stroke [1], [2].
bullet A higher proportion of adults living in Michigan and Indiana (than in other GLR states and in the nation) reported having one or more of the following: hypertension, diabetes, obesity, and high cholesterol .
bullet More adults said they were overweight in Ohio (38.1%), Minnesota (37.2%), and Wisconsin (37.1%); and obese if living in Indiana (27.2%) and Michigan (26.2%), as compared to the nation (36.7% overweight, and 24.4% obese) [3].
bullet More people in Indiana (8.3%), Michigan (8.1%), Illinois (7.9%) and Ohio (7.7%) reported having diabetes than in the nation (7.3%) [3].
bullet More than 75.5% of the adults surveyed in each GL state reported consuming less-than-5 vegetable servings a day [3].
bullet Four states reported higher than the nationís percentage of smokers (20.6%): Indiana had the highest number of smokers in the region (27.3%); followed by Ohio (22.3%), Michigan (22%), and Wisconsin (20.7%) [3].

[1] Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics. 2008 Update At-a-Glance. American Heart Association and American Stroke Association (Data from Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Study (GCNKSS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)); p. 15-17.
[2] Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics. 2008 Update. American Heart Association. Circulation. 2008;117: e47, e61-e75.
[3] Self-reported data, 18 years of age and older, 2005 BRFSS survey.

The Regional Mortality from Stroke (age-adjusted, per 100,000)

bullet The regional stroke mortality parallels the national decline during 1999-2005: specifically, it decreased to 48.1 in 2005 from 62.2 in 2000 [1] . However, the regional stroke death rate remained notably higher than at the national level (46.6 in 2005 as compared to 60.9 in 2000) [1].


[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Compressed Mortality File 1999-2005. CDC WONDER On-line Database, compiled from Compressed Mortality File 1999-2005 Series 20 No. 2K, 2008. Retrieved from http://wonder.cdc.gov/cmf-icd10.html on Mar 24, 2008 11:00:53 AM.

Gender Gap by Age in Regional Stroke Mortality (Trends during 1999-2005)

bullet A gradually closing gender gap in stroke mortality of males and females 35 years and older was noted in the region during 1999-2005 (age-adjusted rate, per 100,000). However, as in the nation, the regional stroke mortality was higher for men 55 years of age and older (in all age-groups 84 years or younger) since 1999 [1].
bullet The regional stroke mortality (per 100,000) was notably higher for both men and women 75-84 years, as compared to persons in lower age-groups [1].
bullet Though stroke mortality declined gradually during 1999-2005 in 75-84 year old adults, for most years, it stayed well-above 400/100,000 persons, and was notably higher in men [1].
bullet As more women than men reach older age, and as stroke mortality increases with age, women 85 years of age and older registered the highest regional stroke fatality consistently from 1999 to 2005 [1].
bullet From 1999 to 2005, a markedly decreasing trend was noted in adults 85 years of age and older [1].
[1] Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics. Compressed Mortality File 1999-2005. CDC WONDER On-line Database, compiled from Compressed Mortality File 1999-2005 Series 20 No. 2K, 2008. Retrieved from http://wonder.cdc.gov/cmf-icd10.html on Mar 24, 2008 11:00:53 AM.

GLR Stroke Mortality by Race

bullet The highest overall stroke mortality (age-adjusted, per 100,000) was recorded for black men living in the region; and, by state, for black men living in Indiana, followed by Illinois (CDC Wonder 2005) [1] .
bullet In every state in the region, stroke mortality was higher for black women than white men. In turn, white men had higher mortality than white women 8 (with the exception of Wisconsin, which reported lower rates in black women than in white men and women) [2] .


[1] Cerebro-vascular disease (stroke) overall mortality rate reported per 100,000 persons (age-adjusted to US 2000 standard population). Source: CDC Wonder, 2005; Compressed Mortality data.
[2] Minnesota reported a lower but unrealiable rate for black women.

National Stroke Statistics

bullet Stroke is the 3rd leading cause of death in the United States after heart disease and cancer; and a leading cause of long-term disability [1],[2].
bullet The estimated prevalence of stroke among adults age 20 and older was approximately 5,800,000 (3,400,000 females) [1], [2].
bullet According to the American Stroke Association, approximately 600,000 first attacks and 180,000 recurrent strokes occur every year for a total of 780,000 [1], [2].
bullet The risk of stroke varies with age by gender. Overall, 60,000 more women than men have a stroke each year because women generally live longer and their risk of stroke increases with age [1], [2].
bullet Twice as many black adults as white have a risk of first-ever stroke. Stroke also strikes twice as many black children as white [2].
bullet On average, someone suffers a stroke every 40 seconds; and every 3 to 4 minutes someone dies of stroke [2].
bullet According to the American Heart Association the direct and indirect cost of stroke to the nation is estimated for 2008 at $65.5 billion [2].

[1] Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics. 2008 Update At-a-Glance. American Heart Association and American Stroke Association (Data from Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky Stroke Study (GCNKSS), National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS), National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)); p. 15-17.

[2] Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics. 2008 Update. American Heart Association. Circulation. 2008;117: e47, e61-e75.