American Friends Service Committee records
MSAFSC67

 An inventory of the collection at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Summary Information

Repository
Richard J. Daley Library Special Collections and University Archives
Creator
American Friends Service Committee.
Title
American Friends Service Committee records
ID
MSAFSC67
Date [inclusive]
1931-1967
Extent
64.25 Linear feet
Language
English
Abstract:
The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a nonsectarian pacifist and service organization which was founded by Quakers in Philadelphia in 1917 in order to provide conscientious objectors with an opportunity to aid civilian war victims. The AFSC helps work with people to organize community action to obtain better education, housing, and working conditions. Today, the AFSC carries out service, development, social justice, and peace programs throughout the world. The work of the organization is based on the Quaker belief in the worth of every person and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice. The collection consists of a range of materials documenting the work of the AFSC including, but not limited to: tape recordings (1959-1961), surveys, clippings, reports, newsletters, press releases, correspondence, photographs, minutes, speeches, promotional literature, budgets, constitutions, position papers, biographical sketches, and programs.

Preferred Citation

American Friends Service Committee records, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago

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Biographical Sketch

The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a nonsectarian pacifist and service organization which was founded by Quakers in Philadelphia in 1917 in order to provide conscientious objectors with an opportunity to aid civilian war victims. During its first year, the AFSC sent young men and women to France where they cared for refugee chidren, founded a maternity hospital, repaired and rebuilt homes, and helped returning refugees restart their lives. After the war ended in 1918, the AFSC helped Russian workers who were victims of famine and disease. It also helped Poland and Serbia to establish an orphanage and rehabilitate their agriculture. Also, the AFSC fed hungry children in Austria and Germany. In the 1930s, the AFSC helped refugees escape from Adolph Hitler's Germany, provided relief for children on both sides of the Spanish Civil War; fed refugees in occupied France, and helped victims of the London blitz. The AFSC helped with relief and reconstruction in many parts of Europe after World War II, as well as in India, China, and Japan. The AFSC also mobilized itself to lend assistance to many of the conflicts that followed World War II including the Korean War, the Hungarian Revolution, and the Algerian War. In the 1950s, the AFSC began to focus its efforts on relieving tensions in order to prevent war. The committee created programs of social and technical assistance in developing nations in order to address the disparity between rich and poor nations. It has also brought together mid-career diplomats from many nations in informal, off-the-record conferences. More recently, the organization has begun targeting injustice in the U.S. by involving itself with Native Americans, Mexican-Americans, African-Americans, migrant workers, prisoners, and the poor. The AFSC helps work with people to organize community action to obtain better education, housing, and working conditions. Today, the AFSC carries out service, development, social justice, and peace programs throughout the world. The work of the organization is based on the Quaker belief in the worth of every person and faith in the power of love to overcome violence and injustice.

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Scope and Contents

The collection consists of tape recordings (1959-1961), surveys, bibliographies, pamphlets, reprints, memoranda, clippings, statements, reports, newsletters, press releases, leaflets, lists, bulletins, correspondence, handbooks, forms, photographs, minutes, memorial booklets, petitions, circulation letters, yearbooks, resolutions, questionnaires, speeches, policy statements, editorials, statements of beliefs, directories, schedules, manifestos, proposals, prayers, plans of action, promotional literature, tests, answer sheets, research papers, information tables, poems, manuals, fact sheets, notes, interviews, information literature, budgets, constitutions, evaluations, agendas, proposals, testimonies, advertisements, calendars, films, study guides, reviews, position papers, biographical sketches, invoices, receipts, fact sheets, announcements, background data, and programs.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

Richard J. Daley Library Special Collections and University Archives June 2006

801 S. Morgan Street
Chicago, Illinois, 60607
312.996.2742

Revision Description

  12/15/2009

Restrictions on Access

None.

Restrictions on Use

None.

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Related Materials

Related Material

Researchers may be interested in accessing the archives of the national American Friends Service Committee which are held at the AFSC national offices, 1501 Cherry Street, Philadelphia, PA 19102. Form more information about accessing the archives of the national American Friends Service Committee (http://www.afsc.org/ht/d/sp/i/1321/pid/1321).

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Controlled Access Headings

Corporate Name(s)

  • American Friends Service Committee. -- Archives

Subject(s)

  • Chicago African American History.
  • Chicago Community Organizations.

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General note

File listing not available online. Please contact Special Collections for file level description.

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Collection Inventory

File listing not available online. Please contact Special Collections for file level description.