A Century of Progress records
COP8

 An inventory of the collection at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Summary Information

Repository
Richard J. Daley Library Special Collections and University Archives
Creator
Century of Progress International Exposition (1933-1934 : Chicago, Ill.).
Title
A Century of Progress records
ID
COP8
Date [inclusive]
1927-1952
Extent
22.25 Linear feet
Language
English
Abstract:
A Century of Progress International Exposition was held in Chicago during the summers of 1933 and 1934 to commemorate the incorporation of the city in 1833. This collection consists of the extant operating records of A Century Progress World's Fair.

Preferred Citation

A Century of Progress records, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago

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Administrative History

A Century of Progress International Exposition was held in Chicago during the summers of 1933 and 1934 to commemorate the incorporation of the city in 1833. Sponsors of the fair sought to broaden its appeal by adopting a theme of universal significance - the spectacular advances of science and technology during the period 1833-1933. Chicago, according to fair boosters, was "the only city of major importance whose entire life had been passed within this remarkable century, one in which the application of science to industry had brought profound changes in both the economic and cultural structure." The exposition was to serve as the "dramatization of the progress of civilization during the hundred years of Chicago's existence."

Although a number of suggestions for an appropriate celebration of the centennial had been advanced earlier, serious planning began in 1926 when Mayor William E. Dever, at the request of the Chicago Historical Society and the Chicago Plan Commission, appointed a Centennial Committee of 150 members. The Committee report, issued in July, 1927, called for the construction of several permanent buildings - a hospital, convention hall, and sports arena - in conjunction with a lakefront exposition. The report concluded that "the expenses incident to the financing of a celebration properly commemorative of Chicago's 100th Anniversary cannot be justified if the event is to take the character of a mere passing show." These proposals, submitted to the new Mayor, William H. Thompson, were opposed by a group of prominent businessmen on grounds that the general public had little interest in such an exposition, and that previous fairs had been financial disasters, sometimes precipitating business depressions. At this point, plans for a fair were abandoned.

The project was revived in November 1927, by Charles S. Peterson, who called together a new committee of sponsors. This group, which included Samuel Insull, Bernard E. Sunny, Chauncey McCormick and others, enlisted the support of Charles G. Dawes, then Vice President of the of the United States. With this backing, they appeared to before the Chicago City Council in December and received approval to organize a centennial fair. In January 1928, the Sponsors received a non-profit corporate charter as the Chicago's Second World's Fair Committee. Officers elected were Rufus C. Dawes, President; Charles S. Peterson, Vice-President; Daniel H. Burnham, Secretary; and George Woodruff, Treasurer. An Executive Committee was appointed with full power to act between meetings of the Board. The corporate name was changed to A Century of Progress on July 15, 1929.

Financing for the fair came entirely from private sources. The financial Committee, headed first by Samuel Insull and later by Charles G. Dawes, raised $271,400 for initial operating monies by the sale of Founder and Sustaining Memberships at $1,000 and $50 during January - February, 1928. A World's Fair Enrollment Committee sold advance memberships to the general public at $5.00; wide distribution of these certificates, which could be exchanged for ten admission tickets, helped promote popular interest in the fair. The bulk of the financial support, however, was obtained through the sale of $10, 000, 000 in gold notes at 6% interest, guaranteed against 40% of the gate receipts and secured by pledges of individual guarantors. Advance sales of exhibit space (begun in 1931, before the buildings were constructed) and tickets provided additional funds. Finally, goods and services needed for fair construction and valued at more than $2, 500,000 were contracted with gold notes as payment. After the close of the fair, demolition and restoration of the site, and liquidation of all claims, the corporation had a surplus of approximately $160, 000 which was divided, according to previous contract, among the Chicago Park District (formerly the South Park Commission), the Museum of Science and Industry, the Art Institute, the Adler Planetarium and other institutions which had made substantial contributions to the success of the exposition.

A Century of Progress was held on the lakefront from 12th Place to 39th Street, including Northerly Island and the lagoons. Although the lakefront had been considered the prime site from the earliest plans for an exposition, securing authority for its use required careful negotiations with the South Park Commission who held jurisdiction over the area. The enabling act authorizing the South Park Commissioners to conclude a contract with the fair corporation was passed by the Illinois General Assembly in June 1929; the Century of Progress Ordinance was not issued by the Commissioners until April 1930. Provisions of the ordinance included posting of a substantial performance bond as well as agreement to completely clear and restore the site to the satisfaction of the Commissioners. A second ordinance was passed, incorporating slight changes in the site boundaries, to cover the operating period 1934. After demolition of the fair in 1935, the status of obligations between the Century of Progress and the Chicago Park District was settled by decree of the Superior Court, December 29, 1937.

In the early stages of preparation, fair officials sought assistance in developing master plans in two critical and interrelated areas - architecture and scientific exhibits. The theme of scientific progress was to be developed not only through exhibits but also by the buildings which housed them. Thus the fair architecture would represent application of the most advanced concepts in design construction to the problem of effective display of scientific exhibits.

An architectural Commission was appointed in March, 1928 with responsibility for determining the overall development of the buildings and grounds. The Commission produced an asymmetrical plan of "modern" design which recommended extensive use of the water areas to balance the long, narrow site. Mass application of a vivid color scheme for exteriors and interiors was presented as a means of defining aspects of individual buildings and unifying the diverse structural forms. Illumination of the fairgrounds by night for decorative effect was also an important feature of the plans. Eventually the site was divided into sections, each architect preparing designs and preliminary drawings for at least one building. The structure with the most architectural impact was the Travel and Transport Building, designed by E. H. Bennett, H. Burnham and J. A. Holabird. It featured a dome with interior dimensions of 125 feet high and 200 feet across, hung by an intricate cable system. The dome enclosed the "largest unobstructed area beneath a roof" that had been constructed up to that time, and represented the "first important application of architecture of the suspension bridge principle of support."

Scientific expertise was secured through the cooperation of the National Research Council, which endorsed the fair in October 1928, and named a large Science Advisory Committee. The preliminary report of this committee, issued April 8 1930, called for the construction of a "temple of science" to house exhibits in biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics; a mountain range for exhibits in earth sciences; and a Maya Temple for anthropological exhibits. In addition, 750,000 square feet of exhibit space was to be allotted to displays of applied science and technology. These recommendations were so inclusive that their implementation would have required virtually the entire space of the fair as finally constructed. Because of the stringent financial limitations following the stock market crash in October 1929 (the day after the gold notes were issued), major cut-backs had to be made in the proposals of the architectural and scientific advisory boards. The Works and Exhibits Departments were charged with producing plans that could be carried out within the budget. Their scaled-down plans did result in some drastic changes to the original proposals. For example, the Hall of Science, conceived as the architectural and conceptual focal point of the fair, was originally to be built astride the 16th street bridge over the lagoon. This type of construction was rejected as too costly, and a design intended for a general exhibits building was modified to serve as the Hall of Science. Ralph Walker's proposal for a massive tower of water and light at the lower end of the lagoon was also eliminated because of cost, the Skyride being substituted. The Exhibits Department consolidated the Science Advisory Committee recommendations under broad general categories and solicited exhibits from industries in areas where the fair could not afford to construct its own. The donor was allowed to display a product trade name on such exhibits - e. g., mining equipment for metallurgical display - a practice resulting in charges of commercialization.

Administration of the fair was highly centralized in the office of the General Manager, Lenox Riley Lohr. Lohr was responsible only to the President and had direct control over all opereating departments. He named all department heads, approved all expenditures, and signed all contracts. In the attempt to minimize operating expenses in 1934, the departmental organization was abandoned. Administrative authority was delegated to special assistants to the General Manager who were responsible for specific operating functions or districts of the fair.

Principle fair features were the scientific and industrial exhibits; historical replicas of old Fort Dearborn and a group of buildings associated with Abraham Lincoln; pavilions of the states and federal government; foreign villages, including the notorious "Streets of Paris;" and the Midway and Enchanted Island amusements. The Art Institute cooperated by staging an important exhibit with the theme, "A Century of Progress in American Collecting." The Adler Planetarium was operated as an attraction, and special events and athletic contests were held in nearby Soldier Field. Te fair sponsored a pageant of transportation entitled, "Wings of a Century," as well as nationality days, visits by distinguished guests, conferences and professional meetings and miscellaneous publicity stunts.

A Century of Progress was originally scheduled to run from May27 to November 12, 1933, but the attendance (ca 22. 3 million) ran far below the projection of 60 million with the result that the bondholders had been paid only 50% on their investment. The decision to operate a second year was based on the estimate that the overhead expenses could be reduced to a minimum resulting in a larger daily take from the gate receipts, which could be used to retire the gold notes. This prediction proved to be correct. The 1934 fair, billed as the beginning of a New Century of Progress, attracted over 16 million paying customers between May 26th and October 31 and resulted in a slight surplus after the bondholders had been paid in full. This successful financial conclusion is cited as the outstanding accomplishment of the fair officials, especially in view of the opposition of many of the leading Chicago businessmen and the depressed economic conditions of the country.

According to the terms of the Century of Progress Ordinance, the site was to be cleared and restored to the satisfaction of the South Park Commissioners. In practice this meant that certain improvements - service roads, utilities etc. - were retained by the Park Board, which also took over the Administration for its headquarters until 1940. All other structures were razed - the sole exception being a commemorative marble column to General Italo Balbo and the Italian aviators who flew to the fair in 1933. This was given by the Italian government to the City of Chicago and stands on the fair site off Lake Shore Drive.

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Scope and Contents

This series contains the records of Comptrollers Arthur Andersen and M. M. Tveter. It includes material regarding the issue of gold notes, payroll, subscriptions, fair revenue and attachment and garnishment suits as well as a departmental history.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

Richard J. Daley Library Special Collections and University Archives June 2005

801 S. Morgan Street
Chicago, Illinois, 60607
312.996.2742

Acquisition Information

The Manuscript Section of the UIC Library received the records as part of the Lenox Riley Lohr Collection in 1968. This donation also included records of the Chicago Railroad Fair (1948 to 1949) and Lohr's personal papers. Each of these groups was handled as a separate collection. A Century of Progress papers became part of the Lohr Collection in the following way:

The Century of Progress corporation continued in existence a number of years after the close of the exposition to supervise demolition, little legal claims, and close the accounts. The General Managere was charged by the Board of Trustees with writing the official history of the fair. Lohr's staff went through the files and removed specific items to compile special subject folders, chronologies and department histories. The items, as well as certain important record groups, were sent to Lohr's New York office when he became President of NBC in 1936. Meanwhile, the bulk of the corporate records were transferred from the Administration building on the fairgrounds to a downtown Chicago office under the supervision of the Secretary. Selected series were loaned out to persons working on the official history.

In 1940, when Lohr returned to Chicago to become President of the Museum of Science and Industry, he proposed that A Century of Progress office be closed and all records be transferred to the Museum. The museum also assumed all outstanding obligations and claims of the corporation. A Century of Progress memorial exhibit was dedicated on May 27, 1942. In the course of these moves, some of the records were lost or destroyed, although no systematic appraisal and disposition was carried out. The official fair history was not published until 1952, when Lohr revised sections of the manuscript and issued it as Fair Management. After Lohr's death in 1968, the Century of Progress papers were offered to the UIC Library.

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Related Materials

Separated Material

The following items were discarded: insurance release cards for Skyride passengers; certificates of appreciation to employees (index retained); invitations and address list for Sears Roebuck tea; demolition permits (index retained); demolition personnel - time cards; exhibitors' and concessionaires' application permits, sales agreements; alphabetical and numerical lists of form numbers; construction orders; galley proofs for Fair Management. The following record series are missing and presumed destroyed by the donor: operations and maintenance files; works department; design and construction files for exhibitors.

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Collection Inventory

Series VIII: Comptroller 

Box Folder

Report of Department, ca. 1933-1934 

1 8-1

Addressograph Company, 1932 

1 8-2

Administration Building, 1930-1932 

1 8-3

Arthur Anderson and Co., 1934 

1 8-4

Amusement Commission, Frank W. Darling, Jan. 1927 

1 8-5

Armored Car Service Brinks Express - contract, 1932-1933 

1 8-6

Assets and liabilities, 1933 

1 8-7

Audit Report - memoranda concerning, 1933-1934 

1 8-8

Automatic Simplex - General Register Corporation, 1932-1933 

1 8-9

Balance Sheet, 1933 

1 8-10

Brand Automatic Cashier, 1932-1933 

1 8-11

H. V. Bright, 1932-1933 

1 8-12

Budget, 1930-1931 

2 8-13

Burroughs Adding Machine Co., May 1932 

2 8-14

Cash forecast, 1932-1933 

2 8-15

Cash requirements, 1931-1932 

2 8-16

Change markers, June 1932 

2 8-17

Chronology, 1931-1932 

2 8-18

Concessions' tickets, 1933 

2 8-19

Construction costs, Nov. 1933 

2 8-20

Contracts, 1932-1933 

2 8-21

Deferred payment contracts, 1933 

2 8-22

Electro acoustic products co., 1933-1935 

3 8-23

Estimated concessions' revenue, 1933 

3 8-24

Exhibits, 1930-1933 

3 8-25

Forms, 1931-1934 

3 8-26

Harry n. Fowler, April 1934 

3 8-27

Fries-Walter Company, 1934 

3 8-28

General Electric Supply Corporation, 1933 

3 8-29

General Office Equipment Corporation, May 1932 

3 8-30

Ingeneration of gold notes, 1935 

3 8-31

Gold notes, June 1, 1934 

3 8-32

Gold notes, Sept. 1, 1934 

3 8-33

Gold notes, Oct. 16, 1933 

3 8-34

Gold notes, Oct. 1, 1933 

4 8-35

Gold notes, Oct. 1, 1934 

4 8-36

Gold notes, Oct. 15, 1934 

4 8-37

Gold notes. Nov. 13, 1933 

4 8-38

Gold notes, Nov. 1, 1934 

4 8-39

Gold notes, Nov. 1934 

4 8-40

Hibbard, Spencer Bartlett Co, 1933-1934 

4 8-41

Hooker Glass and Paint Manufacturer Co, 1934 

4 8-42

Insurance #2, 1933-1934 

4 8-43

Insurance #2, 1933 

4 8-44

Kesner Properties, 1933 

4 8-45

Manager's Weekly Summary, 1931-1932 

5 8-46

Miscellaneous, 1931-1934 

5 8-47

Miscellaneous, 1933 

5 8-48

Medals, 1930-1933 

5 8-49

Monthly statements, 1930-1931 

5 8-50

National Cash Register Co., July 1934 

5 8-51

Pabst Blue Ribbon Casino, 1933-1934 

6 8-52

Palmer House, 1933 

6 8-53

National Cash Register Company, 1931-1933 

6 8-54

Receipts and disbursements, 1933-1934 

6 8-55

Perry manufacturers Company, 1932-1933 

6 8-56

Remington Rand - Business Service, Inc., 1932-1933 

6 8-57

Safes and Vaults, 1932-1933 

6 8-58

Science Advisory Committee, 1931 

6 8-59

Special Days, 1933-1934 

6 8-60

Special Days, 1934 

6 8-61

Taxes, 1932-1933 

7 8-62

Thearle-Duffield Fireworks, Inc., 1933-1934 

7 8-63

Book of tickets, 1934 

7 8-64

Tickets, 1934 

7 8-65

Tickets, 1934 

7 8-66

Tickets, 1934 

7 8-67

Tickets, 1933 

7 8-68

Tickets, 1933 

7 8-69

Tickets - advance payment, 1934 

7 8-70

Tickets, 1934 

7 8-71

Scrip tickets, 1932 

7 8-72

I/M - Comptrollers Office, 1933-1934 

7 8-73

Tickets, 1932-1933 

7 8-74

Tickets, 1933 

7 8-75

Concessionaire's tickets, 1934 

7 8-76

Tickets - commissions, etc, 1934 

7 8-77

Turnstiles - misc. 1932-1934 

7 8-78

Borrisow Turnstiles, 1932 

9 8-79

Guarantors, Dec. 1932 

9 8-80

Virginia Smelting Company, Jan. 1934 

9 8-81

Waivers, 1934 

9 8-82

Florence Youngblood, 1934 

9 8-83

Brooks Contracting Corporation, 1934-1935 

9 8-84

Buettas, Joseph H., 1934-1935 

9 8-85

Causey, Col. W. B., 1934-1935 

9 8-86

Continental Concessions, Co., 1934-1935 

9 8-87

Crown Food Co., 1933-1934 

9 8-88

Czechoslovak, 1934-1935 

9 8-89

Dance Ship, Inc., 1934-1935 

9 8-90

Egeland, Merrill, 1934 

9 8-91

Faermark, Jacob, 1934-1935 

9 8-92

Grove, 1934-1935 

9 8-93

Greek Exhibits, Inc., 1934-1935 

9 8-94

Henry New York Bar, 1934-1935 

9 8-95

Iannelli Studios, 1934-1935 

9 8-96

James, Henry Newton, 1934-1935 

9 8-97

K. G. W. Corporation, 1934 

10 8-98

Lohr, Lenox R., 1934-1936 

10 8-99

Magnunsen, G. R., 1934-1935 

10 8-100

McGrew, Martha, 1934-1936 

10 8-101

Nana, 1934-1935 

10 8-102

Oakes, Harlan G., 1934-1935 

10 8-103

Pabst Blue Ribbon Casino, 1934-1936 

10 8-104

Pavilion Francais, 1934 

10 8-105

Person Exhibitions Co., 1934-1935 

10 8-106

P and R. Enterprises, Inc., 1934 

10 8-107

Patent Exhibits, Inc., 1934 

10 8-108

Parkwood Trading Corporation, 1934-1935 

10 8-109

R and B Amusement Corporation, 1934-1935 

10 8-110

Rosenthal, Cornell and Dwyer, 1934-1935 

10 8-111

Sahrayi Tayeb, 1934-1935 

10 8-112

Tallmadge, Thos. E., 1934-1935 

10 8-113

Thearle-Duffield Fireworks, 1934-1935 

10 8-114

Union Carbide Company, 1934-1935 

10 8-115

Villages, 1934 

10 8-116

Will H. Wade, 1934-1935 

10 8-117

Hiram Walker and Sons, Inc, 1934 

10 8-118

Walgreen Company, 1934 

10 8-119

Woodlawn Service Company, 1934-1935 

10 8-120

York, E. L., 1935 

10 8-121

Zepp, C. W., 1934 

10 8-122

Concessions, 1934-1935 

10 8-123

Exhibits, 1934-1935 

10 8-124

Acts, 1934 

10 8-125

Adler Planetarium, 1933-1934 

10 8-126

Admission and attendance, 1934 

10 8-127

Affidavits, 1934 

10 8-128

Areas, ca. 1933-1934 

10 8-129

Army, 1934 

10 8-130

Art Institute, 1932-1934 

11 8-131

Aviation, Feb. 1935 

11 8-132

Assignments, 1933-1934 

11 8-133

Budgets, 1934-1935 

11 8-134

Chicago Park District, 1935-1936 

11 8-135

Comptroller, 1935 

11 8-136

Construction, March 1934 

11 8-137

Contingent claims, 1934-1935 

11 8-138

Customs, 1934-1935 

11 8-139

Dawes, Charles Gates, 1934-1935 

11 8-140

Demolition, 1934-1936 

11 8-141

Employees, 1934-1936 

11 8-142

Finances, 1931-1936 

11 8-143

Foreign participation, 1933 

11 8-144

Garnishments, 1934 

11 8-145

Health, 1932-1934 

11 8-146

Illinois Central Railroad, 1934-1935 

11 8-147

Immigration, 1925-1933 

11 8-148

Information, 1933-1934 

11 8-149

Insurance, 1933-1935 

11 8-150

Labor, 1934 

11 8-151

Lagoons, 1935 

11 8-152

Lama Temple, 1934-1935 

11 8-153

Liquor, 1934 

12 8-154

Legislation (pending), 1934 

12 8-155

Museum of Science and Industry, June 1935 

12 8-156

Music, Jan. 1934 

12 8-157

N. R. A., 1933-1934 

12 8-158

Other expositions, 1934 

12 8-159

Passes, Feb. 1935 

12 8-160

Patents and copyright, 1933-1934 

12 8-161

Peoples Gas Light and Coke Company, 1932 

12 8-162

Removal Permits, Oct. 1934 

12 8-163

Restaurants, April 1934 

12 8-164

Publicity, 1934 

12 8-165

Releases, 1934 

12 8-166

Signs, 1934 

12 8-167

Skyride, 1934-1935 

12 8-168

Mr. Slusser, 1935-1936 

12 8-169

South Park, 1933-1934 

12 8-170

Suggestions for 1934 Fair, Nov. 1933 

12 8-171

Taxes, 1933-1935 

12 8-172

Transportation, 1933-1934 

12 8-173

Trust Indentures, 1933-1934 

12 8-174

Use of Grounds by Others than the Century of Progress, 1935 

12 8-175

Utility and Equipment Charges, 1934-1935 

12 8-176

Wings of a Century, May 1933 

12 8-177

Mr. Womsley, 1934-1935 

12 8-178

Water ordinance with St. Pump Station, 1932-1937 

12 8-179

Belgian Village, April 1934 

12 8-180

Black Forest Village, 1934 

12 8-181

The Bowery, Sept. 1934 

12 8-182

Colonial Village, 1934 

12 8-183

Dutch Village, 1935 

12 8-184

English Village, 1934-1935 

12 8-185

Hollywood, 1934-1935 

12 8-186

Irish Village, 1934-1935 

12 8-187

Horticultural Exhibit Incorporation, 1934 

12 8-188

Italian Village, 1934-1935 

12 8-189

Lincoln Gr. And Rutledge Tavern, 1934 

12 8-190

Midget Village, 1934-1935 

12 8-191

The Oasis Company, Sept. 1934 

12 8-192

Old Mexico, 1934 

12 8-193

Streets of Paris, 1934-1935 

12 8-194

Shanghai, 1934-1935 

12 8-195

Swiss Village, 1934 

12 8-196

Spanish Village, 1934-1935 

12 8-197

Tunistan Village, 1934 

12 8-198

Loans, 1934 

12 8-199

Demolition data correspondence, 1935-1936 

13 8-200

F. Boggs - daily cash statements, 1934-1935 

13 8-201

F. Boggs - daily cash statements, Aug. - Sept., 1934 

13 8-202

F. Boggs - daily cash statements, May - Aug., 1934 

13 8-203

Accounting - attendance - reports, 1933-1934 

13 8-204

Accounting - attendance - memos, 1930-1933 

13 8-205

Accounting - attendance - memos, 1934 

13 8-206

Accounting - attendance - gate and traffic estimated, 1932 

13 8-207

Accounting budget, June 1931 

13 8-208

Accounting - cashier's division - memos, Aug. 1933 - 1934 

13 8-209

Accounting - cashier's division - memos, July 1933 

13 8-210

Accounting - cashier's division - memos, Jan. 1933 

13 8-211

Accounting - Century of Progress Bank, July 1933 - 1934 

13 8-212

Accounting - Century of Progress Bank, 1932 - June 1933 

13 8-213

Accounting - gold notes, ca. 1933-1934 

13 8-214

Accounting - instructions - Comptroller Dept, 1932-1934 

13 8-215

Accounting - insurance, 1934 

15 8-216

Accounting - insurance, July - Dec., 1933 

15 8-217

Accounting - insurance, Jan. - June, 1933 

15 8-218

Accounting - insurance, 1932 

15 8-219

Accounting - property damage, 1932-1933 

15 8-220

Accounting - property damage, 1932-1934 

15 8-221

Accounting - taxes, ca. 1933-1934 

15 8-222

Accounting - tickets, 1934 

15 8-223

Account - Ticket Division, June 1933 

15 8-224

Account - advance ticket sales, 1932-1934 

15 8-225

Accounting - Ticket Division, Nov. 1932 - May 1933 

16 8-226

Accounting - ticket - employee, 1933-1934 

16 8-227

Accounting - memos, 1934 

16 8-228

Accounting - memos, 1934 

16 8-229

Accounting - memos, July 1934 

16 8-230

Accounting - memos, July 1933 

16 8-231

Accounting - memos, June 1933 

16 8-232

Accounting - memos, Aug. - Dec., 1933 

16 8-233

Accounting - memos, Jan. 1933 

16 8-234

Accounting - memos, Nov. - Dec., 1932 

17 8-235

Accounting - memos, Sept. - Oct., 1932 

17 8-236

Accounting - memos, July - Aug., 1932 

17 8-237

Accounting - memos, May - June, 1932 

17 8-238

Accounting - memos, April 1932 

17 8-239

Accounting - memos, Feb. - March, 1932 

17 8-240

Accounting - memos, Jan. 1932 

17 8-241

Accounting - memos, Sept. - Dec., 1931 

17 8-242

Accounting - memos, May - Aug., 1931 

17 8-243

Accounting - memos, March - April, 1931 

17 8-244

Accounting - memos, Jan. - Feb., 1931 

17 8-245

Accounting - memos, Aug. - Dec., 1930 

17 8-246

Accounting - memos, Jan. - July, 1930 

17 8-247

Accounting - memos, 1929 

17 8-248

Accounting - memos, 1927-1928 

17 8-249

Accounting - office personnel - Areas and Gates, 1934 

18 2-250

Accounting - office personnel - Comptroller Department, 1930-1935 

18 2-251

Accounting - office personnel - Dem., 1934-1935 

18 2-252

Accounting - office personnel - Design and Construction, 1934-1935 

18 2-253

Accounting - office personnel - Events, 1934-1935 

18 2-254

Accounting - office personnel - Exhibits, Jan. 1931 - Jan. 1935 

18 2-255

Accounting - office personnel - lists, 1934 

18 2-256

Accounting - office personnel - Manager, Nov. 1933 - July 1935 

18 8-257

Accounting - office personnel - misc., 1934 

18 8-258

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, Oct. 1934 

18 8-259

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, Sept. 1934 

18 8-260

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, Aug. 1934 

18 8-261

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, July 1934 

18 8-262

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, June 1934 

18 8-263

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, May 1934 

18 8-264

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, March - April, 1934 

19 8-265

Accounting - office personnel - O and M, Jan. - Feb., 1934 

19 8-266

Accounting - office personnel - Promotion, 1934 

19 8-267

Accounting - office personnel - Sales, 1934-1935 

19 8-268

Accounting - office personnel - Secretary, 1933-1934 

19 8-269

Accounting - office personnel - N. R. A., 1934-1935 Aug. 1934 - May 1935 

19 8-270

Accounting - office personnel - N. R. A., July 1934 

19 8-271

Accounting - office personnel - N. R. A., June 1934 

19 8-272

Accounting - office personnel - N. R. A., April - May, 1934 

19 8-273

Accounting - office personnel - N. R. A., July 1933 - March 1934 

19 8-274

Monthly cash statements, 1937-1941 

20 8-275

Monthly cash statements, 1936-1937 

20 8-276

Monthly cash statements, 1936 

20 8-277

Monthly cash statements, 1935-1936 

20 8-278

Accounts receivable, 1935 

20 8-279

Bank account, 1935-1941 

20 8-280

Bank accounts - reconciliation, 1936 

21 8-281

Bank accounts - reconciliation, 1935 

21 8-282

Budget - general, 1934 

21 8-283

Budget - payroll, 1934-1935 

21 8-284

Unclaimed Wages, 1933 

21 8-285

Outstanding payroll draft, 1934-1935 

21 8-286

Budget-payroll, ca. 1933-1934 

22 8-287

Budget-payroll, ca. 1933-1934 

22 8-288

Budget-payroll, ca. 1933-1934 

22 8-289

Budget-payroll, ca. 1933-1934 

22 8-290

Insurance - settlement of claims, 1934-1935 

23 8-291

Correspondence - forms lists and sample letters, 1932-1934 

23 8-292

Contractors insurance certificates, 1932-1933 

23 8-293

Contractors insurance certificates, 1932-1933 

23 8-294

Insurance sub-contractors memoranda, 1934 

24 8-295

Insurance - contractor certificates, 1933-1934 

24 8-296

Demolition contractors certificates, 1934-1935 

24 8-297

Demolition contractors certificates, 1934-1935 

25 8-298

Demolition contractors certificates, 1934-1935 

25 8-299

All risk certificates, 1934 

26 8-300

All risk certificates, 1935 

27 8-301

Accident reports "A", 1934 

28 8-302

Accident reports "B", 1934 

28 8-303

Accident reports "C", 1934 

28 8-304

Accident reports "D", 1934 

28 8-305

Accident reports "E", 1934 

28 8-306

Accident reports "F", 1934 

28 8-307

Accident reports "G", 1934 

28 8-308

Accident reports "H", 1934 

28 8-309

Accident reports "I", 1934 

28 8-310

Accident reports "J", 1934 

28 8-311

Accident reports "K", 1934 

29 8-312

Accident reports "L", 1934 

29 8-313

Accident reports "Mc", 1934 

29 8-314

Accident reports "M", 1934 

29 8-315

Accident reports "N", 1934 

29 8-316

Accident reports "O", 1934 

29 8-317

Accident reports "P", 1934 

29 8-318

Accident reports "Q", 1934 

29 8-319

Accident reports "R", 1934 

29 8-320

Accident reports "S", 1934 

29 8-321

Accident reports "T", 1934 

29 8-322

Accident reports "U", 1934 

30 8-323

Accident reports "V", 1934 

30 8-324

Accident reports "W", 1934 

30 8-325

Accident reports "X", 1934 

30 8-326

Accident reports "Y", 1934 

30 8-327

Accident reports "Z", 1934 

30 8-328

Insurance Ledger, 1931-1932 

30 8-329

Exhibitors Insurance Records, A-C, 1933-1934 

31 8-330

Exhibitors Insurance Records, D-H, 1933-1934 

31 8-331

Exhibitors Insurance Records, I-M, 1933-1934 

31 8-332

Exhibitors Insurance Records, Mc-S, 1933-1934 

31 8-333

Exhibitors Insurance Records, T-Z, 1933-1934 

31 8-334

Concessionaires Insurance Records, A-B, 1933 

32 8-335

Concessionaires Insurance Records, C-F, 1933 

32 8-336

Concessionaires Insurance Records, G-K, 1933 

32 8-337

Concessionaires Insurance Records, L-Mc, 1933 

32 8-338

Concessionaires Insurance Records, N-S, 1933 

32 8-339

Concessionaires Insurance Records, T-Z, 1933 

32 8-340

Employees Auto Insurance, 1933 

33 8-341

contract bonds, 1932 

33 8-342

McGarry Road, 1930-1931 

33 8-343

Fidelity Bond Excess and George Woodruff, 1931-1933 

33 8-344

Workmen's compensation; public liability; contingent liability, 1932-1933 

33 8-345

Automobile Fire and Theft; Automobile P.L and P. D; Automobile contingent, 1933-1934 

33 8-346

Automobile Fire and Theft; Automobile P.L and P. D; Automobile contingent, 1933-1934 

33 8-347

Interior and Messenger Robbery; Safe Burglary; Forgery Bond, 1933 

33 8-348

Fire and Windstorm, 1934 

34 8-349

Fire and Windstorm, 1934 

34 8-350

Motor Boat - fire theft collision and liability insurance; plate glass insurance, 1933 

34 8-351

Fire Insurance Records, 1931 

34 8-352

Fire Insurance Records, 1933 

34 8-353

Fire Insurance Records, 1933 

34 8-354

Fire Insurance Records, 1933 

34 8-355

Insurance certificates - misc., 1934 

35 8-356

Insurance certificates - misc., 1933-1934 

35 8-357

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

35 8-358

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

35 8-359

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

35 8-360

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

35 8-361

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

36 8-362

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

36 8-363

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

36 8-364

Insurance certificates - misc., 1931-1934 

36 8-365

Belgian Village, 1934 

36 8-366

Casualty insurance, 1933-1934 

36 8-367

Receipts for Equipment returned to Owner, 1934-1935 

37 8-368

Bausch and Lomb Optical Co., 1934 

37 8-369

Certificates of borrowed property - H, 1934 

37 8-370

Certificates of borrowed property - J, 1933-1934 

37 8-371

Certificates of borrowed property - I, 1934 

37 8-372

Certificates of borrowed property - K, 1934 

37 8-373

Certificates of borrowed property - L, 1933-1935 

37 8-374

Certificates of borrowed property - M, 1934 

37 8-375

Certificates of borrowed property - N, 1934 

37 8-376

Certificates of borrowed property - O, 1934 

37 8-377

Certificates of borrowed property - P, 1934 

37 8-378

Certificates of borrowed property - R, 1934 

37 8-379

Certificates of borrowed property - S, 1934-1935 

37 8-380

Certificates of borrowed property - T, 1934 

37 8-381

Certificates of borrowed property - U, 1934 

37 8-382

Certificates of borrowed property - V, 1934 

37 8-383

Certificates of borrowed property - W, 1934 

37 8-384

Certificates of borrowed property - X, Y, 1934 

37 8-385

Misc. 1933 loans extended for 1934, 1933-1934 

37 8-386

The Wander Co., 1934 

37 8-387

Wankesha Motor Co., 1934 

37 8-388

Department of Anthropology, Western Reserve University, 1934 

37 8-389

Deutsches Hygiene Museum, 1933 

37 8-390

University of Chicago Press, 1934 

37 8-391

Union Carbide Co., 1933 

37 8-392

A. I. Root and Co., 1934 

37 8-393

Georg Roemmert, 1934 

37 8-394

Dr. Saul Pollack, 1934 

37 8-395

Museum of Science and Industry, 1934 

37 8-396

Harvard University Division of Anthropology, 1934 

37 8-397

Tulane University, 1934 

37 8-398

Buffalo Society of Natural Sciences, 1934 

37 8-399

Social Science, 1933 

38 8-400

Sante Fe Indian School, 1933 

38 8-401

Maya Temple, 1933-1934 

38 8-402

R. G. Callahan, 1933 

38 8-403

Field Museum of Natural History, 1933 

38 8-404

University of Chicago, 1933-1934 

38 8-405

University of Pennsylvania, 1933 

38 8-406

Travel and Transport Bldg, 1934 

38 8-407

Travel and Transport Bldg, 1933 

38 8-408

Medical Section, 1933-1934 

38 8-409

Miscellaneous Matters, 1933 

38 8-410

Customs, 1933-1934 

38 8-411

Empty Cases, 1934 

38 8-412

Exhibits - protection, etc., 1934 

38 8-413

Return of borrowed property, 1934 

38 8-414

Installation of exhibits, 1934 

38 8-415

Interior painting, 1934 

38 8-416

Lecture room, 1934 

38 8-417

Legends, Signs etc., 1934 

38 8-418

Misc., 1934 

38 8-419

Murals, 1933-1934 

38 8-420

Finances, 1934 

38 8-421

R. E. Smith, 1934 

38 8-422

Bee Culture Laboratory; Bureau of Entomology, Washington D. C., 1933 

38 8-423

Major C. L Fordney, 1935 

38 8-424

Foote Mineral Co., 1934-1935 

38 8-425

General Biological Supply House, Feb. 1935 

39 8-426

Prof. L. C. Graton, 1934-1935 

39 8-427

Hammer Laboratories, 1934 

39 8-428

Charles Handy, Inc., 1934 

39 8-429

Harvard University, 1934 

39 8-430

Dr. Ross Harrison, 1934 

39 8-431

Hawaiian Entomological Society, 1934 

39 8-432

M. L. Hayes, 1934 

39 8-433

W. E. Hinds, 1934 

39 8-434

Mabel Holm, 1934 

39 8-435

Hot Springs Chamber of Commerce, 1934-1935 

39 8-436

Hygrade Sylvania Corp., 1934-1935 

39 8-437

Illinois Chemical Lab, Inc., 1933-1934 

39 8-438

Indiana University, 1933-1934 

39 8-439

Insurance, 1933-1934 

39 8-440

International Filter Co., 1934 

39 8-441

Nickel Co., 1933-1934 

39 8-442

Isaak Walton League, 1933-1934 

39 8-443

C. E. Johansson, Inc., 1933-1934 

39 8-444

S. C. Johnson and Sons, co., 1934 

39 8-445

Dr. Carl Jucci, 1933-1934 

39 8-446

Kansas Geological Society, 1933-1934 

39 8-447

r. Clyde E. Keeler, 1933 

39 8-448

Keuffel and Esser Co., 1934 

39 8-449

Keystone View Co., 1933-1934 

39 8-450

Lafayette College, 1933 

39 8-451

Dr. H. H. Laughlin, 1934 

39 8-452

D. H. Lehmer, 1933 

39 8-453

Chas. F. L'Hommedieu and Sons, Co., 1934 

39 8-454

Linde Air Products Co., 1933-1935 

39 8-455

Loyola University Medical School, 1933-1934 

39 8-456

City of Los Angeles, 1933-1934 

39 8-457

Father Joseph Lynch, 1934 

39 8-458

Madaras Rotor Power Co., 1934 

40 8-459

Mallinckrodt Chemical Company, 1933-1934 

40 8-460

Dr. O. Mangold, 1934-1935 

40 8-461

Mayo Clinic, 1934 

40 8-462

Maywood Chemical Works, Jan. 1934 

40 8-463

Memorial Hospital, Jan. 1934 

40 8-464

Merck and Co., 1933-1934 

40 8-465

Metal and Thermit Corp., 1934 

40 8-466

Milwaukee Public Museum, 1933 

40 8-467

Theodore Morales, 1934 

40 8-468

J. M. Murray, 1934 

40 8-469

Museum of Science and Industry, 1934 

40 8-470

Museum of Science and Industry, 1934 

40 8-471

National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, 1934 

40 8-472

National Foundation for Scientific Research, 1934 

40 8-473

The National Geographic Society, 1934 

40 8-474

Daniel Nechroni, 1933 

40 8-475

New Jersey Zinc. Co., 1934 

40 8-476

Northwestern Improvement co., 1934 

40 8-477

Northwestern University, 1934 

40 8-478

Raymond O'Neil, 1934 

40 8-479

The Oriental Institute, 1934 

40 8-480

Mr. Francis Owen, 1933 

40 8-481

Pasteur Institut, 1934 

40 8-482

Bradley M. Patten, 1934 

40 8-483

Peltier Glass Co., 1934 

40 8-484

The Pennsylvania State College, June 1934 

40 8-485

Pennsylvania State Geological Survey, 1933-1934 

40 8-486

The Perser Corp., 1934 

40 8-487

Phila and Reading Coal and Iron Co., 1934 

40 8-488

Dr. E. F. Phillips, 1933 

40 8-489

Phillips Lamp Works, Nov. 1933 

40 8-490

Dr. Saul Pollack, 1933-1934 

40 8-491

Pribram's Microbiological Collection, 1934 

40 8-492

Purdue University, 1935 

40 8-493

Purdue University, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1933 

40 8-494

Radium Service Corp. of America, 1934 

40 8-495

Rand McNally Co., 1935 

40 8-496

Raritan Copper Co., 1934 

40 4-497

Rascher and Betzold, 1933 

40 4-498

Georg Roemmert, 1934 

40 8-499

A. I. Root Co., 1934 

41 8-500

The Royal Institution, 1934 

41 8-501

S.A.C.T.E.R., 1934 

41 8-502

Albano Schmalz, 1933 

41 8-503

The Science Museum, 1935 

41 8-504

Sharp and Smith, 1934 

41 8-505

E. H. Sheldon and Co., 1933 

41 8-506

G. F. Shepherd, 1934 

41 8-507

Simoniz Company, 1934 

41 8-508

C. E. Smith, 1935 

41 8-509

H. Armour Smith, 1933 

41 8-510

Theodore Soller, 1935 

41 8-511

Societe Boracifera de Loardarelles, 1934 

41 8-512

Sperry Gyroscope co., 1934 

41 8-513

Spencer Lens Co., 1933-1935 

41 8-514

Standard Brands, 1934-1935 

41 8-515

Charles J. Story, 1934 

41 8-516

Syracuse University, 1934 

41 8-517

Texas Gulf Sulphur Co., 1934 

41 8-518

C. H. Thordarson, 1934 

41 8-519

Tulane University, 1934 

41 8-520

University of Chicago, Department of Anthropology, 1934 

41 8-521

Misc., 1934 

41 8-522

U. S. Davy, 1934 

41 8-523

U. S. National Park Service, 1933-1934 

41 8-524

Bureau of Standards, 1934 

41 8-525

U. S. Geological Survey, 1934 

41 8-526

U. S. Dept. of Agriculture, 1934 

42 8-527

U. S. Coast and Geodetic Survey, 1934 

42 8-528

U. S. Bureau of fisheries, 1934 

42 8-529

Union Carbide and Carbon Corp., 1933-1934 

42 8-530

University of Chicago, Department of Zoology, 1933-1934 

42 8-531

University of Chicago, Walker Museum, 1934-1935 

42 8-532

University of Chicago, Whitman Laboratory, 1934 

42 8-533

University of Chicago Press, 1934 

42 8-534

University of Illinois, Department of Chemistry, 1933-1934 

42 8-535

University of Illinois, Department of Physics, 1934 

42 8-536

Victor Chemical Company, 1934 

42 8-537

Virginia Geological Survey, 1933-1934 

42 8-538

W. L. Wachter, Lafayette College, 1933 

42 8-539

A. Von Grosse, University of Chicago, 1934 

42 8-540

Capt. R. J. Walters, Miami Aquarium, 1934-1935 

42 8-541

Ward's Natural Science Establishment, 1934 

42 8-542

W. M. Welch Mfg. Co., 1934 

42 8-543

Western Reserve University, Department of Anthropology, 1934-1935 

42 8-544

Western Television Research Corp., 1934 

42 8-545

Westinghouse X-Ray co., 1934 

42 8-546

Wild Flower Preservation Society, 1933 

43 8-547

Capt. J. E. Williamson, 1934-1935 

43 8-548

B. H. Willier, Department of Ecology, University of Chicago, 1933 

43 8-549

Milo Winter, 1933 

43 8-550

Wisconsin University, 1935 

43 8-551

Dr. J. S. Young, Mallinckrodt Chemical Co., 1934 

43 8-552

Carl Zeiss, Inc., 1934 

43 8-553

Wander Co., 1933 

43 8-554

Wander Co., 1933 

43 8-555

Wander Co., 1934 

43 8-556

New Construction, 1934 

43 8-557

Basic Science, 1933 

43 8-558a

Cash Book, 1936-1941 

44 8-558b

Payroll Record, 1927-1936 

44 8-559

Manager's Daily Report, Aug. - Oct., 1934 

44 8-560

Manager's Daily Report, May - Aug., 1934 

44 8-561

Comptroller's Daily Report, May 1934 - Oct. 1934 

44 8-562

Comptroller's Concessions Reports, 1934 

44 8-563

General Ledger, 1935-1940 

45 8-564

Chart of Accounts - W. M. Herzog, ca. 1933-1934 

45 8-565

Chart of Accounts - A. J. Groh, ca. 1933-1934 

45 8-566

Journal Voucher Ledger, 1936-1941 

45 8-567

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