Emma Goldman collection
MSGold69

 An inventory of her papers at the University of Illinois at Chicago

Summary Information

Repository
Richard J. Daley Library Special Collections and University Archives
Creator
Goldman, Emma, 1869-1940.
Title
Emma Goldman collection
ID
MSGold69
Date [inclusive]
1918-1991
Extent
0.5 Linear feet
Language
English
Abstract:
Published writings by Emma Goldman, Maxim Gorky, and a newspaper clipping regarding her legacy as a political radical.

Preferred Citation

Emma Goldman collection, Special Collections and University Archives, University of Illinois at Chicago

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Biography of Emma Goldman

Emma Goldman was born on June 27, 1869 to Taube Bienowitch and Abraham Goldman in Kovno in the Russian Empire (present-day Kaunas in Lithuania). Goldman's formative years were spent in Konigsberg and St. Petersburg where she was exposed to university radicals.

Emma Goldman emigrated to America in 1885 and worked in the textile industry in Rochester, New York. Moving onto New York City in 1889, Goldman joined the anarchist movement. She traveled throughout the United States lecturing and writing on her anarchist philosophy, women's rights, and social issues such as birth control.

Goldman's prominent role in the anarchist movement brought her into contact with international radicals including Mexican revolutionaries and Russian Bolsheviks. Goldman was incarcerated several times for civil disobedience, encouraging the poor and hungry to seize food, violating standards of public decency (as interpreted by contemporary courts), and opposition to military conscription. Deprived of her U.S. citizenship in 1908, Goldman left the U.S. permanently in 1919 during the Red Scare.

Settling initially in Soviet Russia in 1919, Goldman became disillusioned with communism by 1923. She then married a Welsh miner to obtain British citizenship and spent the rest of her days promoting her own form of anarchism throughout the world, visiting the United States only once in 1934. Emma Goldman died of complications from a stroke on May 14, 1940 in Canada.

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Scope and Contents

The Emma Goldman Collection consists of published writings by Emma Goldman, Maxim Gorky and a newspaper clipping regarding the legacy of her political theories and activity for future generations.

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Administrative Information

Publication Information

Richard J. Daley Library Special Collections and University Archives 2004-03-10

801 S. Morgan Street
Chicago, Illinois, 60607
312.996.2742

Revision Description

  07/23/2010

Restrictions on Access

None

Restrictions on Use

None

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Controlled Access Headings

Personal Name(s)

  • Goldman, Emma, 1869-1940. -- Archives

Subject(s)

  • Anarchists -- United States.
  • Chicago Political and Civic Life.
  • Midwest Women's History.

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Bibliography

See http://sunsite.berkeley.edu/Goldman/ for more information about Emma Goldman.

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Collection Inventory

Series I: Emma Goldman Papers 

Box Folder

The Masters of Life: An Interview by Maxim Gorky. New York: The Mother Earth Publishing Association; clipping regarding Emma Goldman's legacy; and 3 pamphlets - Goldman, Emma. Preparedness, the Road to Slaughter. New York: Mother Earth Publishing Association, (1916?); Goldman, Emma.  The Truth about the Boylsheviki. New York: Mother Earth Publishing Association, (1917?); Goldman, Emma.  The Individual, Society and the State. Garden City, N.Y.: The Garden City Publishing Company, (1934?), 1916-1934 

1 1

Correspondence, biographical sketch of Emma Goldman by Joseph Fels and Weda C. Addicks, 1924 

1 2

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