Hull House Collection

An inventory of the collection at UIC


Funded by the generous support of the National Endowment for the Humanities



Collection Summary

Creator:Hull House Association
Title:Hull House Collection
Dates:1889-
Abstract: Hull-House, founded in 1889 by Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr, was the first social settlement in Chicago. The settlement was incorporated in March, 1895, with a stated purpose to "provide a center for higher civic and social life, to initiate and maintain educational and philanthropic enterprises, and to investigate and improve the conditions in the industrial districts of Chicago." From 1889 to 1963, Hull-House operated a wide-ranging program from its complex of buildings at 800 S. Halsted St. In 1963, when the settlement vacated the complex on Halsted Street to provide space for the new campus of the University of Illinois at Chicago Circle, Hull-House decentralized and began operating settlement programs in a number of neighborhood locations.
Quantity: 34 linear feet
Identification: HHC

Administrative History of Hull House Association

In 1889, Jane Addams and Ellen Gates Starr rented the former home of real estate developer Charles Hull and opened Chicago's first social settlement. The Hull-House settlement house offered educational and social activities to the surrounding neighborhood and its pioneering staff used social science research as the basis of a wide range of influential reform initiatives. Hull-House gained local, national, and international attention for its programs and activities. An important leader in the Progressive movement, the settlement house provided a model for other settlement houses throughout the United States. Hull-House operated for 74 years at its Halsted Street location before decentralizing into several neighborhood centers.

Hull-House was located on the Near West Side of Chicago, a port of entry neighborhood for new immigrants in the late 19th century. An 1895 study done by Hull-House residents identified 18 different ethnic/nationality groups living in the area surrounding the settlement. Italian, Russian, Polish, and Lithuanian Jews, Irish, Bohemians, and later Greeks worked in neighborhood sweatshops and in the factories and lumberyards lining the Chicago River. The neighborhood was densely populated and suffered from congestion, inadequate housing, poor sanitation, and one of the highest infant mortality rates in the city.

Inspired by the example of Toynbee Hall in London, the world's first social settlement, Addams and Starr sought to establish reciprocal relationships with the neighbors surrounding their settlement in order to both assist and learn from them. They initially had no formal plan and merely hoped, Addams later reported, that "the mere foothold of a house, easily accessible, ample in space, hospitable and tolerant in spirit, would be in itself a serviceable thing for Chicago. " They began by inviting neighbors for social events, reading parties, and classes in the arts.

Addams and Starr were joined by a volunteer residential staff, which paid room-and-board to live at the settlement. Both male and female volunteers lived at the settlement, many having full-time jobs to subsidize the experience. Residents lived in the original Hull mansion and later, on the top floors of other Hull-House buildings. Living within the settlement in order to respond knowledgeably to neighborhood conditions was a key component of the settlement idea. By 1894, 20 residents were living at Hull-House. Early resident's tended to be middle- and upper middle-class, college educated, and from a wide range of professions. Several women played key roles in early Hull-House efforts: Florence Kelley, Julia Lathrop, physician Alice Hamilton, and labor organizer Mary Kenney. Edith and Grace Abbott, Sophinisba Breckinridge, and Alzina Stevens joined them. Musician Eleanor Smith, artist Enella Benedict, and theater directors Laura Dainty Pelham and Edith de Nancrede were instrumental in arts programming. The settlement became a center for discussions of social reform and attracted well-known visitors and supporters such as architect Frank Lloyd Wright, attorney Clarence Darrow, suffragist Susan B. Anthony, photographers Jacob Riis and Lewis Hine, sculptor Lorado Taft, Fabian Socialists Beatrice and Sidney Webb, and temperance leader Frances Willard.

In March 1895, in order to secure a 25-year lease on settlement land, the settlement house incorporated. In addition to her title as head resident, Addams became president of the Board of Trustees. Board members, appointed for terms of seven years, included Addams's companion Mary Rozet Smith, architect Allen Pond, educator John Dewey, William Colvin, philanthropist Louise deKoven Bowen, and heir to the Hull property, Helen Culver. The charter adopted by Hull-House Association stated its purpose as:

"To provide a center for higher civic and social life, to initiate and maintain educational and philanthropic enterprises, and to investigate and improve the conditions in the industrial districts of Chicago."

Hull-House programs grew at a rapid pace as settlement residents became more familiar with the needs of the neighborhood. Services for children included a kindergarten, nursery, well-baby clinic, public gymnasium, and playground. In 1907, Hull-House residents founded the Juvenile Protective Association. The settlement included a branch of the Public Library, a Post Office, and a cooperative boarding house for young workingwomen. It acted as a liaison with city charities and social service agencies. Numerous social and recreational clubs attracted both children and adults. Educational programs for adults included college extension classes, lecture series, and vocational training. The arts were addressed through a rigorous Music School program, classes in visual and craft arts, sponsorship of theater groups and productions, exhibits, dance classes, and a collection of artwork for loan to club members. Many activities were geared towards neighborhood immigrants. Hull-House sponsored ethnic festivals and social events, taught English and citizenship classes, helped found the Immigrants Protective League, and in 1900, established the Hull-House Labor Museum to showcase ethnic craft skills. By 1907, the settlement reported 9,000 people attended classes or participated in activities.

Residency fostered the investigation of neighborhood conditions and Hull-House residents explored child labor, tenement conditions, ethnic groups, infant mortality, midwifery, cocaine use, and the causes and prevention of truancy. Many of their findings were published in the American Journal of Sociology. They used this information to lobby for reforms that would counter the conditions found in their neighborhood. They worked for tenement house legislation, the 8-hour day, the right of workers to unionize, compulsory school attendance laws, public health initiatives, and were instrumental in founding the country's first Juvenile Court.

The settlement physically grew to accommodate added programs. In 1895, the original building was enlarged and by 1907, there were 12 additional buildings. Designed by architects Irving and Allen Pond, they included: the Butler Gallery (1890), the Gymnasium and Coffee House (1893), the Children's Building (1895), the Jane Club (1898), an Auditorium (1899), a Men's club (1902) and 3 story Apartment building (1902), a Women's Club building (1904), a Music School (1905), a Boy's Club (1906), Dining Hall (1907) and the Mary Crane Nursery (1907). In 1912, Louise DeKoven Bowen donated land in Waukegan to develop the Bowen Country Club, a summer camp for children and adults.

Helen Culver, heir to Charles Hull, provided free rent during the settlement's first four years and Addams's family inheritance provided the initial funding for settlement operations. To meet growing expenses, in 1893 Addams created the House Committee for the collection of living expenses from residents. The Ten Account, begun with ten initial donors, raised funds for routine operating expenses. Although prominent Chicago businessmen made contributions, the bulk of financial support came from wealthy Chicago women. Mary Rozet Smith, Helen Culver, Anita McCormick Blaine, Mary Wilmarth, and Sara Hart contributed. Louise deKoven Bowen was the single largest contributor to the settlement and after she was appointed treasurer of Hull-House Association in 1907, she assumed much of the responsibility for fund-raising strategy.

The ethnic composition of the neighborhood changed after World War I, as immigration quotas cut off the flow of European immigrants to the U.S. In the 1920s, Mexicans began to move into the area south of the settlement and later, African Americans moved to the south and west. Addams, a pacifist, spent increasing amounts of time away from the settlement traveling to promote her ideals. She was a founding member of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and in 1931, received the Nobel Peace Prize.

Jane Addams death in the spring of 1935, after surgery to remove an intestinal blockage caused by cancer, led to a crisis at the settlement. Louise deKoven Bowen became the new President of the Hull-House Board and a committee of residents ran the settlement while a successor was chosen. After Alice Hamilton and Grace Abbott declined the position, the Hull-House residents petitioned the Board of Trustees to appoint long-time resident Adena Miller Rich as the new Head Resident. Rich, who was Director of the Immigrant's Protective League, agreed to take on the unpaid position on a half-time basis. Rich recruited new residents to replace a staff dwindled by death, illness and retirement. By 1937, 71 people (not counting the Jane Club) were residing at Hull-House. The Jane Addams Memorial Fund, Hull-House's first professional fund-raising campaign began to solicit funds to replace those formerly contributed or raised by Addams. Hull-House also accepted Chicago Community Fund monies, something Addams had resisted during her tenure.

Based on her interest in issues of immigration, Rich established a new Department of Naturalization and Citizenship to deal with immigrant education and liaison with the Immigrants Protective League. She also created a Committee on International Relations and a committee to improve housing and sanitation in the surrounding neighborhood. To deal with the aftermath of the Great Depression, a new emphasis was placed on recreational programs for the neighborhood. With Addams gone, the Hull-House Board took on a more assertive role. Rich eventually resigned under pressure to become full-time and accept a salary.

After Rich's departure, Kennicott Brenton, the House Secretary administered Hull-House until a replacement was found. In 1937, Charlotte E. Carr left the directorship of the New York City Emergency Relief Bureau to assume the lead role in the settlement. With a new title of Director (rather than Head Resident), Carr initiated reorganization to formalize the settlement's structure. Many volunteers were replaced with paid workers and professional staff were appointed to head each department. The settlement also made use of skilled workers supplied from the Works Progress Administration (WPA; later Works Projects Administration) and the National Youth Administration (NYA).

Most neighborhood residents were no longer foreign-born and Carr added two departments to reflect what she believed to be the new needs of the neighborhood. The Community Service Department formed community-based clubs and supported better housing, cleaner streets and improved schools and recreational facilities for the neighborhood. Naturalization and Citizenship classes were transformed into the Workers' Education Department to educate first-generation Americans in labor law and collective bargaining. Concerned that the settlement was not responding to African Americans who were entering the neighborhood in large numbers, Carr recruited journalist and public housing advocate Dewey Jones and his wife Faith Jones as residents.

Carr's changes to settlement programs and her political activism created tensions with the Board and with residents that led to her departure in January 1943. Ruth Orton Camp was Acting Director until Russell Ward Ballard, the first male Director, was appointed in September 1943. Ballard was a graduate of the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration and had been superintendent of the Illinois State Training School for Boys before the Hull-House Board recruited him.

The settlement responded to World War II by offering first aid, home nursing, Americanization classes, and physical training for military service. It also housed the community headquarter of the Office of Civilian Defense. Ballard appointed Elaine Switzer program director in 1945 and new program policies began that focused on neighborhood services. Latvians, Hungarians, and Greeks displaced by the war and Japanese Americans released from relocation camps joined the neighborhood population in the post-war years. In the 1950s, services were also extended to Puerto Rican newcomers. "The Hull-House Credo and Its Practice: A Re-Definition by the Board of Trustee's, 1952" described the mission of the settlement: Hull-House offers "constructive recreational and cultural opportunity for leisure time of all ages, races, creeds. It provides hospitality for neighborhood and civic groups and participates in efforts for community betterment. " Departmental revenues, rentals from residents, endowment earnings, individual donations, and the Chicago Community Fund financed programs.

The Hull-House neighborhood was also physically changing. In 1938, the Jane Addams Homes, the city's first public housing development, was built southwest of the settlement. Hull-House established a Branch Center in the development with a full-time Spanish-speaking volunteer. In the 1950s, parts of the neighborhood were razed for industrial use and to accommodate the new Congress and Dan Ryan expressways.

After the war, state legislation concerning "blighted areas" prompted Near West Side neighborhood residents to form the West Side Community Committee. In 1947, its members met with Director Ballard to discuss what the neighborhood could do to influence its own future. With assistance from Hull-House, a Temporary Organizing Committee was formed. Headed by Eri Hulbert, great-nephew of Addams, the sixty-five-member committee was composed of neighborhood residents and representatives from business, industry, social, civic, religious and educational institutions. At a public meeting attended by over 500 residents on June 15, 1949, the Near West Side Planning Board (NWSPB) was established to ensure neighborhood participation in urban renewal decisions for the area. With funding from Hull-House, the Field Foundation, the Wieboldt Foundation, The Emil Scwartzhaupt Foundation, and other foundations and individuals, the NWSPB worked with neighborhood residents and businesses to create a plan for the rehabilitation of the neighborhood. The NWSPB successfully lobbied for three urban renewal ordinances in the City Council. One designated a part of the neighborhood as a conservation renewal area; another allowed for the creation of the first shopping center in the midst of the Jane Addams Homes. The third decreed the fifty-five acre Halsted-Harrison neighborhood as a "slum and blight" area for clearance and residential redevelopment. In 1957, after the Hull-House Board withdrew Schwarzhaupt Foundation funds in order to establish the alternative Hull-House Citizens Participation Project, the NWSPB effectively ceased functioning. Their report, prepared by Paul B. Johnson, a professor at Roosevelt University, was not published until 1960.

The NWSPB's plans for the neighborhood had already been challenged, however. Returning GIs had put a severe strain on the temporary campus established by the University of Illinois at Navy Pier in 1946. The University began to look for a new home in the Chicago area. When several suggested sites fell through, Mayor Richard J. Daley formally proposed the fifty-five acre Harrison-Halsted site and 90 surrounding acres as a new potential location. The area included the Hull-House complex of buildings as well as many still-standing neighborhood homes and businesses. President of the University of Illinois, Dr. David Dodds Henry and the Board of Trustees accepted the new site on February 15, 1961 and plans for the campus were passed by city council ordinance on May 10, 1961.

Neighborhood residents who would be displaced by the new campus protested. The Harrison-Halsted Community Group was formed headed by neighborhood resident Florence Scala. Its executive board consisted of neighborhood residents, primarily women, and several Hull-House residents including long-time resident Jessie Binford. The Harrison-Halsted Community Group held protest marches and took their fight to the City Council, the University of Illinois Board of Trustees, the Illinois Housing Board, the State Legislature, and the Federal Housing and Home Finance Agency. When these efforts were ineffective, they filed suit in state and federal courts, finally losing their appeal in the Illinois and U.S. Supreme Courts in 1963.

On March 5, 1963, the Hull-House Board of Trustees, which had been spilt by the controversy, accepted an offer of $875,000 for the settlement buildings. On March 29 and 30, a sale of Hull-House furnishings occurred and the settlement was vacated April 1, 1963. That year, all but two of the Hull-House buildings were razed.

In response to community and nationwide pressure, the University of Illinois agreed to preserve two of the original Hull-House buildings as a memorial to the settlement. Funded by a campaign of the University's Board of Trustees and the University of Illinois Foundation, the original building in which the settlement had been founded and the Residents' Dining Hall building were restored by Frazier, Raferty, Orr, and Fairbank. They were opened to the public and declared a national historical landmark in spring, 1967.

After moving from the Halsted street site, Hull-House decentralized into several centers. Some of the centers were new; others were already-existing organizations that affiliated with Hull-House Association. Several also had satellite programs. Designed to respond to individual neighborhoods, each had its own board, director, and program. Residency was dropped and staff members no longer lived at the site. Paul Jans, who replaced Ballard in 1962, presided over the move and reconfiguration of the settlement.


Scope and Contents

The Hull-House Collection was assembled by the Special Collections Department of the University of Illinois at Chicago beginning in 1966. It consists of material documenting the history of Hull-House from its founding in 1889 until the mid 1960s when the settlement moved from its original location on Halsted Street. The materials have been collected from a variety of sources including members of the Hull-House Board of Trustees. The majority of this collection was acquired between 1966 and 1972, however new material continues to be added. The collection was arranged for the first time in 1973. In 2004, new accessions were integrated and the collection was partially rearranged. The folder numbers assigned during the original arrangement of this collection have been maintained. As a result, the folder numbers are not in strict numerical order. Folders marked with an asterisk are oversized. The material is arranged into the following series and subseries:

I. Board of Trustees Minutes

II. Board of Trustees General Files

III. Board of Trustees Committees

IV. Board of Trustees Papers, Proposals, Studies and Proceedings

V. Legal Records

VI. Financial Records

VII. Head Residents and Directors:

A. Jane Addams

B. Russell Ward Ballard

C. Charlotte Carr

D. Paul Jans

VIII. Hull-House Residents and Associates

IX. Hull-House Programs:

A. Visual Arts

B. Music School

C. Theater

D. Mary Crane Nursery School

E. Clubs

F. Bowen Country Club

G. Dance

H. General Files

X. Publications:

A. Annual Reports (includes Hull-House Bulletin and Hull-House Yearbook)

B. Serials

C. Occasional Publications

D. Brochures

E. Hull-House Association publications (1963 - 1969)

XI. Scrapbooks

XII. Clippings:

A. Hull-House Clippings

B. Other Clippings

XIII. Subject Files

XIV. Hull-House Anniversaries

XV. Near West Side Planning Board


Restrictions

Restrictions on Access

None


Index Terms

This record series is indexed under the following controlled access subject terms.
Subjects:
Hull House Association--Archives.
Social settlements--Illinois--Chicago--Sources.
Hull-House and Settlement House History
Midwest Women's History


Bibliography

Addams, Jane. Twenty Years at Hull-House with Autobiographical Notes. 1910. Reprint. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1990.

Bryan, Mary Lynn McCree and Allen F. Davis, eds. One Hundred Years at Hull-House. Rev., expanded ed. of: Eighty Years at Hull-House, 1969. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1990.

Rosen, George. Decision-Making Chicago-Style: The Genesis of a University of Illinois Campus. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1980.


Detailed Description/Box and Folder Listing

Series I - Board of Trustees Minutes

BoxFolder
Series I consists of minutes of meetings and financial reports of the Hull-House Board of Trustees from 1895 to 1970.
BoxFolder
11 April, 1895 - January, 1919
2 March, 1895 - October, 1924
3 January, 1925 - November, 1936
4 April, 1895 - April, 1934 - incomplete drafts
5 January, 1937 - March, 1940
6 April, 1940 - December, 1942
7 February, 1943 - December, 1944
8 August, 1944 - December, 1944
9 November, 1944 - November, 1945
10 December, 1945 - December, 1946
11 January, 1947 - December, 1947
12 January, 1948 - December, 1948
13 January, 1949 - December, 1949
14 January, 1950 - December, 1950
15 January, 1951 - December, 1951
16 January, 1952 - December, 1952
17 January, 1953 - December, 1953
18 January, 1954 - December, 1954
19 January, 1955 - December, 1955
20 January, 1956 - December, 1956
21 January, 1957 - December, 1957
22 January, 1958 - December, 1958
23 January, 1959 - December, 1959
24 January, 1960 - December, 1960
25 January, 1961 - May, 1961
26 June, 1961 - November, 1963
27 January, 1962 - May, 1962
28 June, 1962 - November, 1962
29 January, 1963 - December, 1963
30 January, 1964 - December, 1964
31 January, 1965 - November, 1965
32 January, 1966 - December, 1966
33 January, 1967 - December, 1967
34 January, 1968 - December, 1968
35 January, 1969 - December, 1969
36 January, 1970 - December, 1970



Series II - Board of Trustees General Files

BoxFolder
Series II consists of materials relating to the business of the Hull-House Board of Trustees. The series appears to be the files of William Deknatel, member and president of the Hull-House board of Trustees.This series includes correspondence, memoranda, policy statements, meeting minutes, blueprints, and invoices.The materials pertain to Hull-House policies, programs, fundraising and finances as well as the maintenance of the Hull-House complex of buildings. Specifically, this series contains information on the appointment of William Deknatel as president of the Board of Trustees; the work of the Edith DeNancrede Memorial Committee; negotiations for a proposed film about Jane Addams; the Near West Side Planning Board; the establishment of the NFS Training School at Hull-House; the Chicago Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers; as well as land clearance and the sale of the Hull-House property to the City of Chicago for the Chicago campus of the University of Illinois.
BoxFolder
1676 General files - Hull-House buildings; Halsted Street, 1906, undated
37 General files, 1938-1949
38 Hull-House building maintenance, 1937-1940
39 Hull-House administration and finances, 1941-1951
40 Mechanical Plant, -- Heating, air-conditioning & other repairs, 1937-1949
41 Correspondence, 1939-1953
42 Correspondence - Fundraising, 1946-1952
43 Correspondence, Financial statements, 1953
44 Correspondence, Meeting minutes, Financial statements 1954
45 Correspondence, 1955-1956
46 Policies, Minutes, Plans and Reports, 1955-1956
47 Correspondence, Financial Statements, 1957-1959
48 Minutes, Plans and Policies, 1960
49 Correspondence, 1958-1961
277 Correspondence - Reprint of Twenty Years at Hull-House, 1961-1964
50 Correspondence, 1959-1966
51 University of Illinois Site, 1961
52 Correspondence received - University of Illinois Site, 1961
704 Correspondence received - Demolition of Hull-House, 1961
705 Correspondence received - Demolition of Hull-House, 1961
706 Correspondence received - Demolition of Hull-House, 1961



Series III - Board of Trustees Committees

BoxFolder
Series III contains material relating to the committees of the Hull-House Board of Trustees. It contains correspondence, memoranda, reports, published material, speeches, and newspaper clippings. The materials deal with the retirement of Russell Ballard and the search for a new director; the selection of the Hull-House neighborhood as the site of the University of Illinois; and the anniversary celebrations of Hull-House. This series also contains some material regarding the history and the programs of the settlement.
BoxFolder
153 Historical Committee, 1958-1967
54 Personnel Committee, 1959-1964
55 Program Committee, 1958-1964
56 Standing Committees, 1961-1963
57 Fortieth Anniversary Committee, 1930
58 Fiftieth Anniversary Committee, 1940
59 Diamond Jubilee Committee, 1964-1965
60 Hull-House Association Board of Trustees Manual, 1968



Series IV - Board of Trustees Papers, Proposals, Studies and Proceedings

BoxFolder
Series IV pertains to the history and mission of Hull-House, proposals for the remodeling of Hull-House, the composition of the neighborhood, and the move from Halsted Street. It contains unpublished papers, reports, blueprints, statistics, maps, invoices and estimates.
BoxFolder
161 Hull-House: The Realization of an Idea, 1889-1945, undated
62 Vlcek, Anton, Hull-House, 1948
63 [Space Utilization] Scheme A, October, 1958
64 [Space Utilization] Scheme D-1, September, 1959
65 Statistics, July 1959
66 Building maintenance, remodeling costs and estimates, includes blueprints, 1959-
67 Murray, Janet P.Long Range Plans: A Study of Present Programs with Special Attention to the Future, November, 1959



Series V - Legal Records

BoxFolder
Series V contains material relating to the legal affairs of Hull-House and Jane Addams. The series includes leases, deeds, bylaws, and articles of incorporation. The series also includes correspondence of Charles P. Schwarz (Hull-House Trustee and Jane Addams' attorney), Jane Addams, Mary Rozet Smith, and Louise DeKoven Bowen.
BoxFolder
177 Articles of Incorporation, March 30, 1895
78 Bylaws, 1944, 1964
79 Charles P. Schwartz files, 1913-1963
80 Hull-House Property - Deeds, 1900
81 Hull-House Property - Deed, 1901
82 Leases, 1892
83 Leases, 1900
84 Leases, 1907-1917
85 Title abstract, 1898
86 Title abstract, 1901
87 Title abstract, 1904
88 Title abstract, 1906
89 Title transfer, 1906
683 Correspondence - incorporation, 1895
684 Sherwood Company - rental agreement, 1889
685 Tooley, James W. - will, 1914
686 Eli Bates House - sale, 1938
687 Nursery School playground - rental agreement, 1939
688 Reuter, Arthur, 1941



Series VI - Financial Records

BoxFolder
Series VI consists of materials relating to the financial affairs of Hull-House. It contains scrapbooks of fundraising letters, lists of contributors, audits of Hull-House as well as ledgers and journals recording the day-to-day income and expenditures of the settlement house.
BoxFolder
190 Jane Addams account book, 1895-1905
91 Appeal letters and records, 1918-1934
92 Appeal letters and records, 1935-1940
93 Appeal letters and records, 1936-1940
94 Appeal letters and records, 1948-1959
95 Appeal letter and records, 1951-1958
96 Appeal letters and records, 1948-1958
97 Auditor's reports, 1909-1925
98 Auditor's reports, 1926-1935
696 Auditor's reports, 1936-1939
697 Auditor's reports, 1940-1944
698 Auditor's reports, 1945-1949
699 Auditor's reports, 1950-1952
700 Auditor's reports, 1953-1955
701 Auditor's reports, 1956-1961
99 Cashbooks, 1894-1895
100 Cashbooks, 1910-1914
101 Cashbooks, 1914-1916
102 Cashbooks, 1914-1917
103 Cashbooks, 1917-1922
104 Cashbooks, 1922-1924
105 Cashbooks, 1925-1928
106 Cashbooks, 1929-1933
107 Cashbooks, 1934-1938
108 Cashbooks, 1938
109 Cashbooks, 1939
110 Cashbooks, 1940
111 Cashbooks, 1941-1943
112 Cashbooks, 1944-1946
113 Cashbooks, 1947-1948
114 Cashbooks, 1949-1951
115 Cashbooks, 1952-1954
116 Cashbooks, 1955-1957
117 Cashbooks, 1958-1961
118 Check Register, 1910-1913
119 Check Register, 1913-1916
120 Check Register, 1917-1920
121 Check Register, 1921-1923
122 Check Register, 1923-1925
123 Check Register, 1925-1928
124 Check Register, 1928-1930
125 Check Register, 1930-1932
126 Check Register, 1932-1934
127 Check Register, 1934-1936
128 Check Register, 1936-1938
129 Check Register, 1938-1939
130 Check Register, 1939-1942
131 Check Register, 1943-1949
132 Insurance - January, 1941 - December, 1957
133 Income Statement Accounts (Revenues & Expenses), 1941
134 Income Statement Accounts (Revenues & Expenses), 1942
135 Income Statement Accounts (Revenues & Expenses), 1943
136 Income Statement Accounts (Revenue & Expenses), 1944
137 Income Statement Accounts (Revenues & Expenses), 1945
138 General Journal, 1891-1893
139 General Journal, 1893-1894
140 General Journal, 1894-1895
141 General Journal, 1910-1912
142 General Journal, 1912-1914
143 General Journal, 1914-1915
144 General Journal, 1915-1916
145 General Journal, 1916-1918
146 General Journal, 1918-1921
147 General Journal, 1921-1923
148 General Journal, 1925-1927
149 General Journal, 1936-1939
150 General Journal, 1940-1941
151 General Journal, 1941-1942
152 General Journal, 1943-1947
153 General Journal, 1948-1957
154 Journal - Hull-House Kitchen Accounts, 1914-1918
155 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1946
156 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1947
157 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1948
158 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1949
159 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1950
160 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1951
161 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1952
162 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1953
163 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1954
164 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1955
165 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1956
166 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1957
167 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1958
168 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1959
169 Ledger - Subsidiary Accounts, 1960
170 Ledger - Contributions and Donations, Lists and Accounts, 1895-1897
171 Ledger, 1895-1901
172 Ledger, 1901-1903
173 Ledger, 1903-1905
174 Ledger, 1910-1912
175 Ledger -- Adjusting and Closing Entries, 1913-1917



Series VII - Head Residents and Directors

BoxFolder
A. Jane Addams: This sub-series contains material about Jane Addams (Head Resident from 1889 to 1935) collected from a variety of sources. In addition to articles written about Addams before and after her death, this sub-series includes a collection of condolence letters on the death of Jane Addams, as well as material regarding the commemoration of the centennial of Addams' birth.
BoxFolder
1247 Barnard, Mrs. Henry. A Legacy of Beauty. Speech to the joint meeting of the Chicago branch of the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom and the Jane Addams Peace Association, May 14, 1955
248 Kaplan, Flora. Nobel Prize Winners: Charts, Indexes, Sketches, 1938?
249 Scott, Anne FirorJane Addams and the City in Virginia Quarterly Review 43(1),[photocopy], 1967
250 Jane Addams Goes Next Door to Poor People, [India], April, 1957
251 Perkins, M. Helen. A Preliminary Checklist for a Bibliography on Jane Addams.Rockford, IL, 1960; misc. bibliographies, 1932-1960
252 Newspaper clippings, 1943-1952
253 Elson, Alex, 1945, On the Tenth Anniversary of Jane Addams' Death
254 Letters of condolence on Jane Addams' death, 1935
255 Letter of gratitude to the residents of Hull-House on Jane Addams' death by James Weber Linn, May 1935
256 Correspondence -- Jane Addams Memorial Fund, 1935
257 Correspondence -- death mask and hand, 1957-1958
258 Clippings -- Jane Addams Centennial, 1960
259 Historical background on Hull-House, prepared for the Jane Addams Centennial, 1961
260 Jane Addams Centennial celebration, 1960
261 Jane Addams Centennial correspondence, 1960
262 Jane Addams Centennial government documents, 1960
263 Jane Addams Centennial miscellaneous, 1960
264 Jane Addams Centennial National Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers, 1960
265 Jane Addams Hall of Fame Committee, n.d
539 Nobel Peace Prize Announcement, 1931
BoxFolder
B. Russell Ward Ballard: This sub-series contains correspondence with Russell Ward Ballard (Director between 1943 and 1962) as well as his published and unpublished writings.
266 Correspondence re: Jane Addams, 1945-1960
267 Correspondence re: Nobel Peace Prize, 1954
268 Correspondence re: Rockford College, 1947-1960
269 Correspondence re: Swarthmore College Peace Collection, 1949-1959
270 Ballard, Russell Ward. An Evening at Hull-House, 1945
271 Ballard, Russell Ward. Delinquency A Community Problem, in The Round Table. National Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers, 1956.
272 Ballard, Russell Ward, And this is Settlement Work, 1957.
273 Ballard, Russell Ward, Should Your Child be a Social Worker?, New York Life Insurance Company Advertisement, 1958.
274 Ballard, Russell Ward, An Overview of the Pioneering Services of Jane Addams and the Implications for Social Work Today, 1960.
540 Clippings, 1943
541 Personnel file, 1943-1980
542 Speeches, 1945-1957
BoxFolder
C. Charlotte Carr: This sub-series contains clippings and correspondence relating to Charlotte Carr, Head resident between 1937 and 1943.
543Clippings, 1940-1956
544Correspondence, 1935-1941
BoxFolder
D. Paul Jans: This sub-series contains material pertaining to Paul Jans's career as a settlement worker-- first in Philadelphia, then as Head Resident of Hull-House. Jans was Director of Hull-House between 1962 and 1969.
275 Correspondence - Lighthouse settlement, Philadelphia PA, 1949-1957
276 Correspondence - Lighthouse settlement, Philadelphia PA, 1958-1963
277 See Board of Trustees - General Files, n.d
278 Correspondence, 1947-1964
279 Hull-House Association material, 1966-1967
280 Conferences - American Association of Social Workers, 1954
281 Conferences - Kansas City Association of Neighborhood Houses, 1959-1960
282 Conferences - National Federation of Settlements, 1952-1956, 1960-1962
283 Conferences - National Recreation Association, 1957-1958
284 British Social Work Exchange, 1963-1965
285 Detroit Group Project, 1947-1949
286 Lighthouse Settlement [Philadelphia] - Report, 1957
287 Lighthouse Settlement [Philadelphia] - Project: Efficacy of Social Group work in Limiting Delinquency, undated
288 Lighthouse Settlement [Philadelphia] - Delinquency project -- final report, undated
289 Speeches, 1949-1952
290 Speeches, 1953-1967
291 Jans, Paul. History of Grace Hill House, St. Louis, Mo. [MSW thesis], 1949
292 Writings - The Reluctant Witness [outline], undated
293 Washington University correspondence, 1965-1967



Series VIII. Hull-House Residents and Associates

BoxFolder
Series VIII contains material pertaining to residents and associates of Hull-House.It contains correspondence, writings, and clippings.
BoxFolder
1294 Lists of Hull-House residents, 1889, 1929, 1930
545 [Unidentified list of women], undated
546 Hull-House staff lists, 1938-1957
547 Hull-House staff material, 1960-1962
295 Minutes of meetings (2 vols), 1893-1896
296 Abbott, Edith correspondence re: U.S. Children's Bureau, 1947-1949
297 Binford, Jessie correspondence, 1937-1964
298 Bowen, Louise de Kovenscrapbook; 80th birthday address, 1936 -1940
299 Bowen, Louise deKoven. The Welfare of Children: How to Prevent Delinquency.Chicago: Commercial Club of Chicago, 1912
300 Breshkovsky, Catherine correspondence, 1910-1911
301 Breshkovsky, Catherine correspondence, 1912-1916
302 Breshkovsky, Catherine correspondence (Ellen Gates Starr), 1905-1917
303 Breshkovsky, Catherine clippings, 1914-1919
304 Breshkovsky, Catherine -- published materials, 1905, 1919
548 DeNancrede, Edith memorial service, 1936
549 Dewey, John correspondence, 1899-1952
550 Elson, Alex clippings, writings, 1945-1953
551 Gamboney, Michael personnel records, 1953-1974
552 Goodman, Benny clippings, 1938-1985
553 Granata, William John clippings, 1938-1948
305 Hamilton, Alice correspondence,[Not in box], 1955-1964
554 Hansen, Helen S. correspondence, 1990
555 Hicks, Robert and Ada - personnel records, 1958-1973
556 Hodes, Art correspondence, clippings, 1963-1991
557 Hodgeman, Donna People Live at Hull-House, memoir, 1943
558 Kelley, Nicholas. Early Days at Hull House, The Social Service Review.28(4), 1954.
306 Lathrop, Julia correspondence, 1901
559 Lovett, Robert Morss, 1931-1956
560 Lund, Thora, undated
561 Maestro Valerio, Guiseppe -- correspondence, 1897-1906
562 Malone, Nicolette personnel records, 1938-1975
563 McDowell, Mary E., 1926
307 McMillen, Wayne correspondence, 1944-1962
564 Molinaro, Frances - personnel records, 1939-1969
565 Mull, Elizabeth Adelle diary, 1912-1914
566 Mulligan, Robert E. personnel records, 1948-1970
308 De Nancrede, Edith -- Her Birthday Party, Dec. 14, 1901
309 Petersen, Alma correspondence, 1947-1961
567 Pond, Irving and Allen, 1918-1939
568 Reynolds, Jean, 1962
569 Roosevelt, Eleanor, 1937
570 Scully, Florence - correspondence, 1906-1913
571 Sears, Amelia, 1923-1972
310 Smith, Mary Rozet, undated
311 Starr, Ellen Gates writings [art and education], 1892
312 Starr, Ellen Gates religious writings, 1924-1929
313 Starr, Ellen Gates annotated periodicals, 1918-1928
314 Starr, Ellen Gates clippings Sacco & Vanzetti, 1927
315 Starr, Ellen Gates obituary, 1940
573 Stevens, Alzina Parsons correspondence,[photocopy], 1893-1897
316 Stevenson, Adlai E. correspondence, 1950-1965
574 Stevenson, Adlai E. speech, 1952
575 Taylor, Graham, 1909-1938
576 Taylor, Lea correspondence, 1917-1963
317 Teller, Sidney A. Teller correspondence, 1947-1964
577 Toniatti, Hector, undated
578 Trine, Verna personnel records, 1957
579 Tucker, Irwin St. John Personal Recollections of Hull House,[1969]
580 Turner, Fred and Betty, 1963
581 Twose, George. Aubrey Beardsley in Perspective, The Dial, June 1889.
582 Urie, Caroline clipping, undated
583 Wald, Lillian D. postcard, undated
584 Watson, Luda correspondence, [photocopy], 1899
585 Weybright, Victor clipping, 1968
318 Hull-House Associates bylaws, minutes, 1945-1952



Series IX. Hull House Departments and Programs

BoxFolder
Series IX contains information regarding some of Hull-House's programs for children and adults. It also contains some information about outside organizations to which Hull-House may have referred people.The material includes correspondence, clippings, promotional material, and program notes.
BoxFolder
A - Visual Arts
BoxFolder
1693Butler Art Gallery - exhibit catalogs, 1896, n.d
586First Report of the Labor Museum at Hull-House. Chicago, 1901-1902
319 Art School - brochures, undated
BoxFolder
B - Music School
337 Programs and leaflets, 1895-1974
338 Programs, 1928-1942
339 Correspondence and miscellaneous, 1962-1966
340 Chicago Community Music Federation, 1962
341 Chamber Music, 1964
587 Clippings, 1896-1941
588 Sheet music - Smith, Eleanor. Come with me from Troll's Holiday, undated
589 Sheet music -- Cousin, Charles. A Cradle Song, undated
590 Sheet music - Smith, Eleanor. Its Summer Today from Troll's Holiday, undated
591 Sheet music - H.S.K.O Holy Child, 1936
592 Sheet music - Koos, Hazel. Spring, undated
593 Sheet music - Koos, Hazel The Wind, undated
594 Sheet music - misc., undated
595 Kennedy, Albert J. The Merman's Bride, Neighborhood: A Settlement Quarterly. 2(2), 1929.
BoxFolder
C - Hull House Theater
343A Condensed Record of Hull-House Players, [Includes list of plays produced from 1899-1939 and names of members from 1898 to 1941], 1896-1941
344General files, 1962-1963
345 General files, 1964-1967
346 General files, 1969
347 Hull-House Theaters, Inc., 1969
348 Finances, 1968-1969
349 Finances fire repair estimates, 1958-1959
350 Hammerman Foundation, 1964-1965
351 Benefit contracts, ca. 1960s
352 Resident professional theater, 1964-1969
353 Sheridan Theater, 1963-1967
354 Touring theater, 1963-1967
355 Programs Halsted Street, [includes fragments of script], 1939
356 Programs, 1899-1910
357 Programs, 1911-1930
358 Programs, 1931-1939
359 Programs, [Not in box], 1946-1967
360 Programs, undated
361 Publicity, 1963-1967
362 Publicity clippings, 1963-1967
363 Intermission, vol. 1, 1965
363 Intermission, vol. 1 July - December, 1965
364 Intermission, vol. 2 January - March, 1966
364 Intermission, vol. 2 April - May, 1966
365 Intermission, vol. 2 June - July, 1966
365 Intermission, vol. 2 September - October, 1966
366 Intermission, vol. 3 February - May, 1967
367 Intermission, vol. 3 January - May, 1967
368 Intermission, vol. 3 June - December, 1967
596 Clippings, 1914-1990
597 Clippings, 1912-1919
598 Hull-House Actors Guild, 1932-1936
599 Intersettlement Dramatic Exchange, 1934
600 Script - Barr, Jane. Teachers Day., undated
BoxFolder
D - Mary Crane Nursery School
336Mary Crane Nursery School - correspondence, 1947-1965
BoxFolder
E - Clubs
688 Working People's Social Science Club, 1892
689 Hull-House Woman's Club, 1892
694 Lakeside Club, 1896
601 Jane Club, 1898
602 Club Book [photocopy], 1898
603 Arnold Toynbee Club, undated
604 Ravenswood Musical Club, 1901
605 Hull-House Woman's Club, undated
606 Gay Set Social and Athletic Club, 1936
607 Hull-House Club Leaders, 1960
608 Story Telling-Play Hour, 1961-1964
609 Markings Club, 1962-1963
610 Silver Swords Club, 1963
611 Heavenly Angels Social Work Club, 1961-1963
612 Heavenly Angels Social Work Club, 1963-1964
BoxFolder
F - Bowen Country Club
613 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - alumni, 1989-1999
321 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - brochures, ca. 1935-1962
322 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - clippings, ca. 1939-1950
614 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - clippings, 1912-1983
323 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - correspondence, 1939-1950
615 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - fundraising, 1937
324 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - history, undated
616 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - Mary Rozet Smith Cottage, 1935
325 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - newsletter, 1932-1957
617 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - newsletter - Chain Around the World, ca. 1940s
326 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - property appraisal, 1959
618 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - reports, 1955-1961
619 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - reports, 1962
327 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - swimming pool modernization, 1950-1951
328 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - swimming pool modernization, 1950-1951
329 Bowen Country Club (Waukegan, IL) - 50th Anniversary Program, 1962
620 Bowen Country Club (East Troy, WI) - clippings, publicity, 1962-1965
330 Bowen Country Club (East Troy, WI) - working papers, drafting room, 1959
331 Bowen Country Club (East Troy, WI) - Proposal for the Bowen Country Club, 1963-1964
332 Bowen Country Club (East Troy, WI) - postcards and leaflets, 1964
333 Bowen Country Club (East Troy, WI) - art and music camp, 1968
BoxFolder
G - Dance
320 Ballet School - misc., ca. 1968
636 Sharp, Cecil J. Country Dance Tunes. London: Novello & Co. Ltd, vols. 1 & 2., undated
637 Chaplin, Nellie. Ancient Dances and Music. London: J. Curwen & Sons, Ltd, 1909.
638 Chaplin, Nellie. Court Dances and Others. London: J. Curwen & Sons, 1911.
639 Brower, Josephine. Morris Dance Tunes. New York: Novello, & Co, ltd., 1909.
640 Novello's School Songs: Children's Singing Games. London: Novello and Co. Ltd, books 228; 229; 933; 1108, 1912.
641 Cott, George C. Old Familiar Dances with Figures. Philadelphia: Oliver Ditson Co., 1918.
642 Italian quadrille - instructions and music, undated
BoxFolder
H - General
334 Film Center - bulletins and reports, 1964-1965
335 Film Center - correspondence, 1964-1965
342 Retarded Children's Aid Training Center, 1954-1959
369 Trade schools and apprenticeship program, 1962-1963
621 Activities - Schedule, 1961-1962
370 Auto shop, 1959-1962
371 Baseball, 1957-1961
622 A Century of Progress International Exhibition - Social Work, Exhibit, 1934
372 Chicago Public Library, ca 1958
691 Coffee Shop and Diet Kitchen, 1891, undated
690 College Extension program, 1893
373 Cooking classes, 1961
374 American Friends Service Committee - Days of Discovery, 1961
629 Historical Background of Hull-House, 1961
692 Hull-House Co-operative Association, 1984
375 Junior Chamber of Commerce--Easter Egg Hunt, 1957-1959
623 Juvenile Court, 1912-1949
624 Juvenile Protective Association, 1960
625 Lectures at Hull-House, 1895
626 Mexican Night, undated
627 Peace Garden Tenth Anniversary, 1961
376 Program evaluations, 1952-1961
377 Program reports, 1944-1945
378 Program reports, 1958-1962
379 Program -staff reports and activities, 1934-1947
380 Program - staff assignments, 1961-1962
381 Program - staff conferences, 1962-1964
382 Program - summer activities, 1952-1962
628 Program evaluation, June 1957
630 Program Policies and Practices, 1960
631 Program Notes - Robert E. Mulligan, undated
632 Public Health - Rats, 1934
633 Residency - policies, 1950
634 Terminal Plans, undated
695 Union and labor meetings, 1892-1894, undated
635 Volunteer - briefings, 1948-1959



Series X - Publications

BoxFolder
Series X contains publications produced by Hull-House.
BoxFolder
A - Annual Reports
BoxFolder
1425 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 1, nos. 1-7, 1896
426 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 1, nos. 2-5, 1896
427 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 2, nos. 1-8, 1897
428 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 3, nos. 7, 10, 11& 12, 1898-1899
429 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 4, no. 3, 1902
430 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 5, 1900-1901
431 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 6, 1903-1904
432 Hull-House Bulletin, vol. 7, no. 1, 1905-1906
433 Hull-House Bulletin, [Jane Addams' bound copy], vol. 1-7, undated
434 Hull-House Yearbook, 1906-1907
435 Hull-House Yearbook, 1910
436 Hull-House Yearbook, 1913
437 Hull-House Yearbook, 1916
438 Hull-House Yearbook, 1921
439 Hull-House Yearbook, 1925
440 Hull-House Yearbook, 1929
441 Hull-House Yearbook, 1930-1931
442 Hull-House Yearbook, 1932-1933
443 Hull-House Yearbook, 1939
444 Hull-House Yearbook, 1939
445 Hull-House Yearbook, 1940
446 Hull-House Yearbook, 1941
447 Annual report, 1942
448 Annual report, 1947
449 Annual report, 1948
450 Annual report, 1949
451 Annual report, 1950
452 Annual report, 1952
453 Annual report, 1953
454 Annual report, 1954
455 Annual report, 1955
456 Annual report, 1956
457 Annual report, 1959
458 Annual report, 1963
459 Annual report, 1964
460 Annual report, 1965
461 Annual report, 1968
462 Annual report, 1969
463 Annual report, 1970
BoxFolder
B - Serials
464 Hull-House Block News, vol. 2-3, 1939
465 Hull-House Boys Club News, vol. 1, no. 2, 1936
466 Hull-House Boys' Record, vol. 1, no. 2, 1910
467 Hull-House Bulletin, 1938, 1942
468 Hull-House Flash, vol. 1, no. 1, 1945
469 Hull-House Magazine, vol. 1, nos. 1-3, 1939-1940
470 Hull-House Octagon, vol. 1, nos. 1-3, 1941
471 The Melting Pot, vol. 1, nos. 1-3, 1941
643 ???, vol. 1, no. 2, 1940
BoxFolder
C - Occassional Publications
472 A Guide for Understanding Hull-House, 1953
473 Addams, Jane. Hull-House, 1889-1909. 1909.
474 Hull-House - A Social Settlement, 1895
475 Hull-House in War Years, 1918, [undated], 1943.
476 Hooker, George.Hull-House Recreation Guide. 1896.
477 Smith, Eleanor. Hull-House Songs. 1915.
478 Some Facts about Chicago's Famous Settlement House. 1939, 1941, 1943.
644 Britton, Gertrude Howe. An Intensive Study of the Causes of Truancy in Eight Chicago Public Schools including a Home Investigation of Eight Hundred Truant Children. Chicago, 1906.
BoxFolder
D - Brochures
479 Art and music, 1922-1941
481 Christmas, 1898-1974
480 Fundraising, ca. 1940s-1960s
482 Fundraising, undated
483 Art School, 1950-1951
484 Music School [missing], undated
485 Des Plaines Valley Community Center, 1969
486 Henry Booth House, ca. 1960s
487 Jane Addams Center, 1963-1965
488 Parkway Community House, ca. 1960s
489 Uptown Center, 1963-1967
490 Miscellaneous, ca. 1940s-1963
BoxFolder
E - Hull House Association: This sub-series includes brochures, clippings, press releases, and assembled pieces of fiction from participants in the Hull-House creative writing program.Materials pertain to Hull-House Association programs, fundraising efforts, theater, and an Ella Fitzgerald benefit concert at the Ravinia music festival.
491 Printed Material, 1963
492 Printed Material, 1964
493 Printed Material, 1965
494 Printed Material, 1966
495 Printed Material, 1967
496 Printed Material, 1968
497 Printed Material, 1969
498 Printed Material, [contents missing], 1970
499 Hull-House Association News, 1963-1970
500 Creative Writing, 1964. Chicago: Hull-House Association, 1964.
501 Creative Writing, 1965.Chicago: Hull-House Association, 1965.
502 Creative Writing, 1966.Chicago: Hull-House Association, 1966.
503 Creative Writing, 1967.Chicago: Hull-House Association, 1967.
504 Creative Writing, 1968.Chicago: Hull-House Association, 1968
505 Early Wine.Chicago: Hull-House Association, 1969.



Series XI - Scrapbooks

BoxFolder
Series XI consists of scrapbooks of clippings dating between 1893 and 1941. The scrapbooks were assembled by Hull-House personnel.
BoxFolder
1506* Vol. 1. clippings, 1889-1894
507* Vol. 2. publications, 1889-1894
508* Vol. 3. clippings and publications, 1895-1897
707* Scrapbook, 1907-1911
509 Clippings, 1895-1899
510 Clippings [not in box], 1899
511 Clippings, 1899
512 Clippings, 1900-1906
513 Inventory of Hull-House furnishings, 1903
514 Scrapbook - Hull-House Coal Cooperative Association, 1894
515 Scrapbook - Labor Museum, 1902; 1941
516 Scrapbook - Ewing St. Church Membership Survey, undated
517 Scrapbook - Nationalities Survey forms, 1893-1896
518 Scrapbook-19th Ward Improvement Club, 1894
519 Scrapbook - Sanitary Survey, 1902-1903
520 Scrapbook - School Survey,[photocopy], 1893



Series XII - Clippings

BoxFolder
A - Hull-House Clippings: This sub-series consists of clippings assembled by Hull-House personnel.
BoxFolder
1521 Press Clippings [missing], 1935-1949
522 Press Clippings, 1943-1949
523 Press Clippings, 1950-1952
524 Press Clippings, 1952-1954
525* Press Clippings [Oversize], 1950-1954
526* Press Clippings, 1954-1960
527* Press Clippings, 1960-1961
528 Clip books - 40th Anniversary of Hull-House, 1930
529 Clip books -- 40th Anniversary of Hull-House, 1930
530 Clip books - 40th Anniversary of Hull-House, 1930
531 Clip books - 40th Anniversary of Hull-House, 1930
532* Clip books, 1959-1962
533* Clip books, 1961
534* Clip books, 1961-1964
535* Clip books, 1965
536* Clip books, 1940
BoxFolder
B - Other Clippings: The following clippings were assembled at the library from a variety of sources
645 Clippings, 1896-1898
646 Clippings, 1899-1900
647 Clippings, 1901
648 Clipping, undated
649 Clippings, 1902-1910
650 Clippings, 1911
651 Clippings, 1912-1914
652 Clippings, [1915]
653 Clipping, 1916-1935
654 Clipping, 1936-1959
655 Clippings, 1960-1962
656 Clippings, 1963-1964
657 Clippings, 1965-1966
658 Clippings, 1967
659 Clippings, 1968
660 Clippings, 1961-1982
661 Clippings, 1983-1987
662 Clippings, 1988-1994
663 Clippings, 1995-1996



Series XIII - Subject Files

BoxFolder
Series XIII contains material indirectly related to the operation of Hull-House.
BoxFolder
1664 Abraham Lincoln Center, 1969, undated
665 Handbook of Settlements in Great Britain,[photocopy], 1922
666 Handbook of Settlements, 1911
667 Juvenile Court of Chicago Roades, Mabel Carter.A Case Study of Delinquent Boys in the Juvenile Court of Chicago.Chicago, 1907.
668 Legal Aid Society of Chicago, 1906
669 Lenroot, Katherine F. The Welfare of Children, The American Journal of Sociology.40(6), 1935, reprint
670 National Federation of Settlements and Neighborhood Centers, ca. 1932
675 Socialist Party of Chicago, 1915
671 Toynbee Hall, 1950-1955
672 United Charities of Chicago, 1957
673 Welfare Council of Metropolitan Chicago, 1961
674 Woman Suffrage, 1911



Series XIV - Hull-House Anniversaries

BoxFolder
Series XIV contains information regarding Hull-House anniversaries
BoxFolder
1677 Hull-House - Fiftieth Anniversary, ca. 1939
678 Hull-House - Eightieth Anniversary, 1969
679 Hull-House - One Hundredth Anniversary, 1989
680 Hull-House - One Hundredth Anniversary - Television programs, 1989-1990
681 Ibid -The House that Jane Built- VHS videotape, ca. 1990
682 Hull-House - greeting cards, undated



Series XV - Near West Side Planning Board

BoxFolder
Series XV consists of the records of the Near West Side Planning Board between 1948 and 1960
BoxFolder
1383 Temporary Organizing Committee - correspondence, 1948-1949
384 Temporary Organizing Committee - agenda, 1948-1949
385 Temporary Organizing Committee - minutes of meetings, 1948-1949
386 Temporary Organizing Committee - working papers, 1949
387 Monthly reports, council committee minutes, 1949-1951
388 Special meetings, reports, finances, 1949-1950
389 Correspondence, 1949-1951
390 Vol. 2 - working papers, 1949-1951
391 Schwarzhaupt Project, 1954-1955
392 Schwarzhaupt Project - reports and correspondence, 1956-1957
393 Reports and meeting materials, 1954
394 Site Designation Report for Slum and Blighted Area Redevelopment Project, undated