Faculty making presentations at the 1997Annual American Public Health Association (APHA) Meeting in Indianapolis included:

Noel Chávez, PhD, RD, associate professor, Michele Kelley, ScD, associate professor, Nadine Peacock, PhD, associate professor, and Myrtis Sullivan, MD, MPH, assistant professor, Community Health Sciences Division, in a panel presentation on "Incorporating Community Talent into Public Health Research." Dr. Sullivan also participated in a panel on "Faculty Experiences, Expectations, and Recommendations for Community-based Collaborative Research and the Community’s Response."

Donald R. Hedeker, PhD, associate professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, on "Multilevel Analysis of Ordinal Data."

Daniel Hryhorczuk, MD, MPH, associate professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Division, and director, Great Lakes Center for Occupational and Environmental Safety and Health, in a panel presentation on "International Research Training in Occupational and Environmental Health."

Susan L. Hughes, DSW, professor, Community Health Sciences Division, and co-director, Center for Research on Health and Aging, on "Addressing Outcomes and Quality Issues through the Continuum of Care" and "From Hospital to Where? Factors Influencing Discharge Patterns for Hospitalized Older Adults."

Frederic J. Kviz, PhD, professor, Community Health Sciences Division, in a panel presentation on "Smoking Cessation among Older Adults in a Managed Care Setting."

Naomi M. Morris, MD, MPH, professor, Community Health Sciences Division, on "Respect: Its Meaning and Measurement as a Basic Element in the Quality of Patient Care."

David Slobodkin, MD, assistant professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, on "A Demonstration of the Feasibility of Mass Immunization against Influenza and Pneumococcus in a Public Emergency Department" and a poster presentation on "Attitudes toward Emergency Department Immunization: A Focus-Group Study of Practitioners."

Gary L. Albrecht, PhD, professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, received the Mary E. Switzer Distinguished Research Fellowship Award for 1998-99 and is co-principal investigator for the Center for Emergent Disabilities within UIC’s Institute on Disability and Human Development. He gave a presentation on "Disability Values, Representations and Realities" at the UNESCO Seminar on Exclusion and Social Justice in Paris in August. Dr. Albrecht published articles on "Women and Disability" in the Journal of Health Services and Health Policy Research, "The Emergence of Disability in Society" in Footnotes, and "Using Subjective Health Assessments in Practice and Policy Making" in Health Care Analysis.

Shaffdeen A. Amuwo, PhD, assistant professor, Community Health Sciences Division, was appointed associate dean for community, government, and alumni affairs, having served as the school’s assistant dean for student affairs since 1988. Dr. Amuwo was the recipient of the School of Public Health Alumni Association’s Recognition Award "for his outstanding dedication and many years of service to [the] association and to the broader public health community." The Public Health Student Association also presented him an award in appreciation of "ten years of outstanding and dedicated service" to students at the School of Public Health.

Robert C. Bailey, PhD, professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, spent the spring in Uganda and Kenya conducting research on male circumcision and HIV infection. While there, he presented workshops and seminars to the Uganda Ministry of Health, National STD/HIV Control Program, the Makerere University Institute of Public Health, the Uganda Viral Research Institute, the Mbale District Medical Office, the Kabarole District Medical Office, and the Kampala Rotary Club. He spoke on national radio on four occasions, including the program "Healthpro," a national call-in show for health promotion. His research was featured in The Monitor and The New Vision, the two leading national daily newspapers. One of the articles was subsequently picked up by CNN for "Danny Chun's CNN Custom News - On Target." As a result of Dr. Bailey's work with the Provincial Medical Office for Nyanza Province in eastern Kenya, the office is embarking upon a program to promote safe male circumcision in all health facilities in the province.

Richard T. Campbell, PhD, director, Methodology Research Core, Health Research and Policy Centers, was the recipient of the Distinguished Career Contribution to Gerontology Award, sponsored by the Behavioral and Social Science Section of the Gerontological Society of America. Dr. Campbell was cited for his "ability to straddle the world of substantive theory and research and complex statistical methods... [He] describes, encourages, and insists on a marriage between research question and methodological choice in ways that make such choices possible... He also pushes the "state of the art" [in articles in The Encyclopedia of Aging and The Handbook of Aging and the Social Sciences], bringing new approaches to the awareness of many."

Kendon J. Conrad, PhD, associate professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, was the lead author of an article on "Case Managed Residential Care for Homeless Addicted Veterans: Results of a True Experiment" that appeared in the January edition of Medical Care.

Faith G. Davis, PhD, director and professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, presented the keynote address on the epidemiology of brain tumors at the Third Biennial Team Up for Triumph Conference sponsored by the Neuro-Oncology Programs of the University of Colorado Cancer Center and other Colorado-based medical institutions. She was guest faculty at a Harvard Medical School Department of Continuing Education course entitled "Tumors of the Central Nervous System: Brain Tumor Management" and gave a talk on the "Conditional Probability of Survival" at the Society for Neuro-Oncology Annual Meetings in Charlottesville, Virginia. Dr. Davis had two papers published in an online format in a journal called Neurosurgical Focus, one of which was also published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

Melinda L. Drum, PhD, assistant professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, was elected president of the Chicago Chapter of the American Statistical Association for 1997-98.

Samuel S. Epstein, MD, professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, was co-author of books entitled The Breast Cancer Prevention Program - The First Complete Survey of the Causes of Breast Cancer and the Steps You Can Take to Reduce Your Risks and The Safe Shopper's Bible - A Consumer's Guide to Nontoxic Household Products, Cosmetics and Food, both issued by Macmillan Publishing.

Brian R. Flay, DPhil, professor and director, Health Research and Policy Centers, was first author of an article on "Methodological Issues in Drug Use Prevention Research: Theoretical Foundations" in Substance Use and Misuse. Dr. Flay gave a presentation on the "Etiology and Prevention of Adolescent Problem Behaviors" at the Oregon Research Institute Colloquium Series. He is an advisor to The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Substance Abuse Policy Research Program and serves on the Committees on Adolescents and STDs and Developing a Behavioral Research Agenda of the United States Agency for International Development. Dr. Flay and his staff have developed the Chicago African-American Health Behavior Project: Social Development Curriculum and the project’s companion Health Enhancement Curriculum.

Sylvia E. Furner, PhD, associate professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, was named senior associate dean, having served as the School of Public Health’s associate dean since 1996.

Paul J. Goldstein, PhD, associate professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, published an article on "The Relationship between Drugs and Violence in the United States of America" in the World Drug Report of the United Nations International Drug Control Programme. Dr. Goldstein was one of only two Americans to have an article published in the report.

Donald R. Hedeker, PhD, associate professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, was named a member of the Clinical Centers and Special Projects Review Committee of the National Institute of Mental Health Initial Review Group. Dr. Hedeker also participated as a panel member in the Consensus Development Conference on Effective Medical Treatment of Heroin Addiction, sponsored in November by the National Institute on Drug Abuse and the Office of Medical Applications of Research of the National Institutes of Health.

Edward R. Hermann, PhD, PE, CIH, professor emeritus, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Division, presented the keynote address at the Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Industrial Hygiene in Baltimore. Entitled "Striking a Balance," the address considered balances between health and disease, natural laws and man’s laws, professional and business practices, standards based on scientifically derived thresholds and absolute zeros, and leadership and power seeking.

Daniel Hryhorczuk, MD, MPH, associate professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Division, and director, Great Lakes Center for Occupational and Environmental Safety and Health, and associates from the center, co-sponsored a Workers’ Memorial Day Health and Safety Conference and Workshops, held at UIC in April. The theme of the conference was "Advance the Agenda for the 21st Century." Great Lakes Center participants included: Lorraine Conroy, ScD, associate professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Division; John Dimos, MS, program director, Occupational and Environmental Hygiene Services; Leslie Nickels, MEd, program director, Continuing Education; Peter Orris, MD, MPH, program director, International Programs; Mike Ross, MA, project manager; and Joseph Zanoni, MILR, project manager.

Susan L. Hughes, DSW, professor, Community Health Sciences Division, and co-director, Center for Research on Health and Aging, was first author of an article on "Impact of Home Care on Hospital Use: A Meta Analysis" in Health Services Research and of another on "Predictors of Decline in Manual Performance in Older Adults" in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. Dr. Hughes gave presentations on "Using Home Care as a Managed Care Intervention" at the Fiftieth Annual Scientific Meeting of the Gerontological Society of America; "Managed Care Plans for Elderly and Disabled Populations" at the Governor’s Conference on Health and Aging; and "Long-Term Care in a Managed Care Environment" at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign’s Symposium on Long-Term Care: The Appropriate Interaction of Public and Private Payer Systems.

L. Michele Issel, PhD, RN, CNAA, clinical assistant professor, Community Health Sciences Division, gave presentations on "Two Voices, One Typology: Case Management Interventions" and "The Case against Case Management" at the Seventh National Conference on Nursing Administration Research and on "The Economic Value of Caring" at the annual meeting of the Academy of Management. Dr. Issel published an article on "The Economic Value of Caring" in

the Health Care Management Review and another on "Turnover in Nursing Homes: A New Look" in Public Administration Quarterly.

Michele Kelley, ScD, associate professor, Community Health Sciences Division, and Jaime Delgado, BA, research specialist, Health Research and Policy Centers, presented a seminar on participatory research based on their work with the UIC Social Networks Project to the Department of Reproductive Health at the Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta. The Social Networks Project is developing a model for participatory research and has been working with CDC on issues related to community involvement in research. Dr. Kelley and Mr. Delgado also presented a paper on "Expanding Research Methods to Empower Communities and Improve Science" at the XVI World Conference on Health Promotion and Health Education in San Juan, Puerto Rico, in June. The presentation was attended by public health practitioners, advocates, and researchers from eight countries. The Social Networks Project’s document, Principles for Research Collaboration, was distributed to participants.

Frederick J. Kviz, PhD, professor, Community Health Sciences Division, was first author of articles on "Nonresponse in Sample Surveys" in the Encyclopedia of Biostatistics and "Patients’ Perceptions of Their Provider’s Role in Smoking Cessation by Age and Readiness to Stop Smoking" in Preventive Medicine. Dr. Kviz gave a presentation on the United States Department of Health and Human Services Region V Behavioral Science Workforce Study at the Colloquium on the Behavioral Skills in the Public Health Workforce, sponsored by DHHS Region V in Chicago.

Judith A. Levy, PhD, associate professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, was invited by the National Institutes of Health Office of AIDS Research (OAR) to participate in a workshop of the Behavioral and Social Science Research Committee Planning Group to develop the Fiscal Year 2000 NIH Plan for HIV-Related Research. OAR sponsors a workshop each year, bringing together NIH and non-NIH scientists and community representatives to review and prioritize the annual NIH Plan for HIV-Related Research. The plan is a critical document that serves as the framework for the budget development process and also defines those research areas for which AIDS-designated funds may be allocated.

An Li, PhD, assistant professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Division, published articles on "Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in the Sediments of the Milwaukee Harbor Estuary, Wisconsin, U.S.A" in Water, Air and Soil Pollution and on "Sources of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Sediments of the Kinnickinnic River, Wisconsin" in the Journal of Great Lakes Research. Dr. Li also participated in panel presentations on the "Solubility Ratio of Organic Chemicals in Selected Organic Solvents and Water - Relationship with Solute Hydrophobicity," "Distributional Properties of Dioxin and Furan Congener Emission Reate Data," and "Mercury Generation Rates from Dental Wastewater" at the Twentieth Midwest Environmental Chemistry Workshop in Bloomington, Indiana.

Clara Manfredi, PhD, associate director, Health Research and Policy Centers, was first author of an article entitled "Prescribe for Health: Improving Cancer Screening in Physician Practices Serving Low Income and Minority Populations" accepted by Archives of Family Medicine.

Babette J. Neuberger, JD, MPH, assistant professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, was named associate dean for academic affairs, having served as the School of Public Health’s assistant dean in this area since 1994.

Victoria W. Persky, MD, associate professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, has conducted extensive research into the causes of asthma and was quoted on her findings in a Chicago Sun-Times article on the increase of the disease in Chicago. In May, Dr. Persky presented a talk on "Long-Term Health Effects of Environmental Contaminants: The Example of Dioxin" to the Midwest Regional Chapter of the Society of Toxicology.

Thomas R. Prohaska, PhD, professor, Community Health Sciences Division, and co-director, Center for Research on Health and Aging, was named division director. He succeeds Bernard J. Turnock, MD, MPH, clinical professor, who had served as director since 1995.

Jesus Ramirez-Valles, PhD, MPH, assistant professor, Community Health Sciences Division, published an article on "Sexual Risk Behavior among Youth: Modeling the Influence of Prosocial Activities and Socioeconomic Factors" in the Journal of Health and Social Behavior.

Robert J. Rydman, PhD, associate professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, was named to the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute’s National Heart Attack Alert Program as a consultant and is the author of a national survey of emergency department-based Chest Pain Centers in the United States. Dr. Rydman served as chair of the UIC Senate Research Committee in 1997. He chairs the Health Services Research Interest Group for the Society of Academic Emergency Medicine and is a member of the society’s Public Health and Education Task Force working on the Healthy People 2010 Goals for the Nation.

Peter A. Scheff, PhD, professor, Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Division, was named interim director of the division. Dr. Scheff gave lectures on the "Application of Receptor Modeling to Urban Air Quality: State of the Science" and "Application of Receptor Models to Ozone and Ozone Precursors in South East Michigan and Chicago" at the Fourth International Course on Environmental Modeling in Cartagena, Spain in January. He also taught an environmental modeling course on the United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Distance Learning Network that was broadcast via satellite to more than 220 air quality managers at seventy locations across North America. Dr. Scheff has begun a two-year assignment as a technical advisor to the USEPA Region V. Dr. Scheff is currently working with the agency on regional air quality problems including sources and control of ozone, respirable particulate matter, and air toxics.

Susan C. Scrimshaw, PhD, dean, serves as chair of the Legislative Committee of the Association of Schools of Public Health. She testified on behalf of ASPH at a regional public health hearing convened by Health and Human Services Secretary Donna Shalala's Task Force on the Future of Academic Health Centers in Chicago in August. In February, Dr. Scrimshaw testified before Congress on ASPH's appropriations requests for the United States Public Health Service. She also served as a member of two Institute of Medicine/National Academy of Sciences panels, one on "Scientific Opportunities and Public Needs: Improving Priority Setting and Public Input at the National Institutes of Health" and another on "Cancer Research among the Medically Underserved."

Carol J. Simon, PhD, associate professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, gave a grand rounds presentation at the Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration in Rockville, Maryland on "The Influence of Managed Care on the Physician Marketplace" in February. Dr. Simon subsequently presented this talk at the Administrators’ Seminar Series held at the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research. Dr. Simon was the recipient of the School of Public Health’s 1998 Golden Apple Award, given in recognition of outstanding teaching and unusual service to students at the school.

Gary Slutkin, MD, research professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, and director, Chicago Project for Violence Prevention, is working with the World Health Organization and UNICEF on development of a youth health initiative at the global level. He attended a planning meeting in May at WHO’s Geneva headquarters to assist nine countries to incorporate violence prevention in their national adolescent health programs. Dr. Slutkin was invited to UNICEF’s New York headquarters to participate in discussions on future direction for the organization. The Chicago Project for Violence Prevention is now working in seven Chicago communities that account for approximately 40 percent of the city’s homicides. The project’s evaluation framework was included in the WHO Adolescent Health Guide to Countries. Dr. Slutkin was one of two experts invited to present testimony before the National Academy of Sciences-Institute of Medicine Panel on Prevention of Violence in America.

Curtisteen Steward was named associate dean for finance and resource planning, having served as the School of Public Health’s assistant dean in this area since 1993.

Daniel Swartzman, JD, MPH, associate professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, was appointed associate dean for student affairs.

Sharon Telleen, PhD, research associate professor, Health Policy and Administration Division, collaborated with Ukrainian colleagues in Kiev on the Ukraine for the Children of Ukraine Project in March. She was a participant in a panel on "Implementing the National Information Infrastructure Initiative in Schools of Public Health" at the School of Public Health-hosted Distance Learning Conference in April. She also presented information on the online course on "Resource Databases in Public Health" she has developed and taught for four years to train students in the use of the latest information technology to solve public health problems. Working through the school's Maternal and Child Community Health Science Consortium, Dr. Telleen established the data system for the Chicago Public Schools' Cradle to Classroom Program. Other SPH faculty contributing to the project included Myrtis Sullivan, MD, MPH, Kendon J. Conrad, PhD, and Marilyn Willis, RN, MS.

Wayne Wiebel, PhD, associate professor, Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division, and director, Community Outreach Intervention Projects, gave presentations on "Prevention of HIV in Drug Users" at the NIDA/Research Synthesis Symposium; "HIV/AIDS: New Challenges, New Strategies" at the Illinois Department of Public Health Annual Conference; and "Patterns and Trends of Drug Abuse in Chicago" at the NIDA/Community Epidemiology Work Group. He also participated as a panelist for HBO’s Town Meeting and Youth Speak Out on the "Faces of Addiction." Dr. Wiebel implemented the United Nations’ External Evaluation of Drug Demand Reduction and HIV Prevention in Six Asian Countries, including Bangladesh, China, India, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Pakistan, and Viet Nam. A summary of Dr. Wiebel's NIDA monograph entitled "Sampling Issues for Natural History Studies Including Intravenous Drug Abusers" appeared in the 1997 special issue of Substance Use and Misuse.

New Faculty

Hua Yun Chen, PhD, joined the faculty of the Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division as an assistant professor. He received his BS in statistics from Beijing University, his MS in biostatistics from Beijing Medical University, and his PhD in biostatistics from the University of Michigan. Dr. Chen previously served as an assistant professor at Hohai University in Nanjing, China, where his work was recognized with the University President’s Award for Excellence in Teaching and Research. His primary research interest is developing methods to assess and handle missing data in longitudinal study and in survival analysis. Dr. Chen is currently focusing on developing statistical methods that can assess the quality of and manage incompletely observed data. An additional area of interest is designs in epidemiological study and clinical trial.

In memoriam

Dr. William Haenszel, March 1998. A research professor of epidemiology, Dr. Haenszel was a founder of the Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division at the School of Public Health and served on its faculty from 1976 to 1986. He came to the school after retiring as chief of the Biometry Branch of the National Cancer Institute. Although he retired from the school in 1986, he remained active in the division until 1995.

Dr. Haenszel was a renowned epidemiologist and biostatistician who made major contributions in epidemiologic methods and in cancer epidemiology. His famed work on cancer rates in populations who migrated to countries with lifestyles different from those of their home countries (known as migrant studies) helped elucidate environmental and genetic contributions to cancer incidence.

Dr. Haenszel instituted the Haenszel Research Award. Presented annually to an outstanding student, the award is intended to foster excellence in research among students in the Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division. The William Haenszel Memorial Scholarship Fund was established this year in Dr. Haenszel's memory to provide scholarship assistance to students pursuing studies in the division.

Dr. Wallace H. Wilson, September 1997. Dr. Wilson joined the University of Illinois as a research associate with the Survey Research Laboratory on the Urbana-Champaign campus in 1966. Upon completing his PhD in economics at the University of Michigan in 1968, he assumed a position as an assistant professor in UIUC’s Department of Economics.

Dr. Wilson moved to the University of Illinois’ Chicago campus in 1972. He served initially as an assistant professor in the Department of Preventive Medicine and Community Health of the Abraham Lincoln School of Medicine. He subsequently moved to the newly founded School of Public Health to teach in the Program in Health Care Services. Beginning in 1974, he held joint appointments as an associate professor in the School of Public Health’s Community Health Sciences Division and in the School of Medicine.

Dr. Wilson was one of the founding faculty members elected to the Lambda Chapter of Delta Omega, the national honorary public health society, when it was established at the School of Public Health in 1980. He served the chapter as both secretary and treasurer in the early 1980s and later on as president from 1985 until his resignation in 1995.

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