Academic Policies and Standards

Unless otherwise noted, all forms referred to in this Chapter may be obtained from the Academic Coordinator of each division; and may also be obtained from the School of Public Health web-site at http://www.uic.edu/sph.

Importance of Student Handbook

This Student Handbook contains information that is useful to all students in the School of Public Health throughout their program of study. Students should refer to this handbook first whenever they have a question about their programís requirements, SPH policies, educational and research opportunities, or SPH resources, among a variety of other things. The Student Handbook is all-encompassing, and each student will be held responsible for its content and the policies and regulations that apply, regardless of whether the student is informed of these points through other means.

Faculty Advisors

Assignment of an Advisor for Degree Students. Upon admission, each degree student is assigned an individual faculty advisor, based on his/her educational background, experience, and career goals as indicated in the application for admission. For the MS or PhD student, the major advisor must be a member of the Graduate College Faculty.

Role of the Advisor. A continuing relationship between the student and faculty advisor is considered to be an integral part of the educational experience of the School of Public Health. In most effective relationships between student and advisor, the latter is a general counselor. As a person with experience and with broad knowledge of the School and the University, the advisor has specific responsibility to:

Participate in the orientation program for the entering class in the Fall Semester.

Provide information and guidance to advisees on a continuing basis.

Assist advisees in understanding the curriculum and in developing an appropriate program of study.

Ensure that advisees are acquainted with and correctly follow academic policies and procedures, with particular reference to grading practices, standards of performance, graduation requirements, registration and change in registration, prerequisites, waivers, transfers of credit, and timely submission of the program proposal.

Provide continued surveillance of the academic progress of advisees and counsel those experiencing academic problems.

Note: A hold will be placed on a student's registration by the Office of Student Affairs if the student is on the probation list, probation warning list, or if the student does not meet the first submission deadline for the program proposal. The advisor should contact Debbie Meiselman, Student Affairs Coordinator, debm@uic.edu, to remove a program proposal hold and then instruct their advisee to deliver a copy of the approved program proposal to the Office of Student Affairs. The advisor should contact Renita Moore-Shannon, SPH Registrar, rMoore@uic.edu, to remove the probation hold after the student has met and been counseled by his/her advisor.

Be actively involved in the selection and carrying out of independent studies, independent research, the field practicum, or internship, as appropriate.

Refer advisees, as indicated and appropriate, to other faculty, to the Office of the Dean, to the Director of Student Health Services, to the Campus Counseling Office, or to other points of assistance for student needs.

For research students, the advisors help to select the thesis advisor and the members of the various committees: Thesis Examining Committee (MS), the Preliminary Examination Committee (PhD and DrPH), the Dissertation Examining Committee (PhD) and Doctoral Committee (DrPH). The major advisor also usually serves as supervisor of the studentís research and, where required, internship (or works closely with the student to ensure an appropriate placement). The research advisor works actively with the student in identifying an appropriate topic, developing a research protocol and, where required, an internship plan. The advisor also helps the student with obtaining approval for use of human subjects when indicated, and implementing the project; and makes arrangements for the required examinations. The advisor maintains contact with the Committee on Academic Progress and the Office of the Dean for general oversight of the studentís work.

An advisorís check-list for each degree program may be found in an appendix to the Faculty Handbook at www.uic.edu/sph under "Faculty". The check-list may be used by students to assure that s/he seeks appropriate guidance from the advisor.

Advisor for Credit Non-Degree and Non-Credit Students. Students participating in SPH courses through the Credit Non-Degree and Non-Credit Programs are advised by Judith Koruba Washburn, Director of Student Affairs, Room 190B SPHPI, telephone (312) 996-3832.

Change of Advisor. A request for change of advisor should be submitted to the Division Director of the Division to which the student has been assigned. The Division Director is responsible for notifying the Director of Student Affairs of an advisor change.

Program Proposals

An important step in the educational experience at SPH is the development of a program proposal.

Program proposal forms may be obtained from the divisionís Academic Coordinator. The form must be signed by the student, his or her advisor, the Division Director, and the division's Academic Coordinator.

Students in all public health degree programs are required to submit a program proposal early in the development of their individual programs of study. Timely submission of the proposal is evidence that careful consideration is being given to the planning of a program of courses and of a research or internship protocol. Review of the program proposal permits the Division Director to make recommendations which may be helpful or necessary for the student's progress, and also permit the Office of the Dean and the Committee on Academic Progress to monitor compliance with degree requirements.

Deadlines for First Submission of the Program Proposal

MPH Students. The program proposal should be submitted by the end of the first semester of study. (Some divisions may require an earlier submission.)

MS, PhD and DrPH Students. The program proposal should be submitted by the end of the 2nd semester of study.

Petitions to transfer credit and petitions for waiver of core and required courses must be submitted with the initial submission of the program proposal. Deadlines for initial submission of program proposals are the same deadline as for submission of waiver and transfer requests. The program proposal, and any requests for waiver or transfer of courses, must first be approved at the division level; and then both the program proposal and any requests to transfer courses or to waive SPH core courses must be simultaneously submitted through the division's academic coordinator to CAP for approval. [Note requests to waive divisional course requirements need not be approved by CAP.] If the student's research and course plans change subsequent to the approval of the original program proposal then a petition for minor revision or, as necessary, a totally revised program proposal must be submitted following the same process.

If the first submission deadline is not met, a hold will be placed on the student's registration by the Office of Student Affairs. A memo will be sent to the student and copied to the advisor and Division Director indicating the hold has been placed on the student's registration. The hold will be removed when the advisor contacts Debbie Meiselman, Student Affairs Coordinator, to request that the hold be lifted and an approved program proposal has been received by the Office of Student Affairs.

Deadlines for Submission of Revised Program Proposal

A revised program proposal must be submitted to the divisionís Academic Coordinator, no later than the end of the semester prior to the expected semester of graduation. The final program proposal must match exactly the courses taken.

In addition, a revised program proposal must be submitted to the divisionís Academic Coordinator, whenever major changes in the program of study are made (for example, a change in specialization, concentration, or division).

It is strongly recommended (and may be required in some divisions) that students submit a Petition for Minor Revision form to the academic advisor and division director for minor changes in the program of study.

Student Status

Degree Students

Degree candidates are students accepted under prevailing standards of admission and registered in either the Master of Public Health degree or Master of Science degree program. Candidacy is granted to students in the Doctor of Public Health or the Doctor of Philosophy degree programs only after satisfactory performance on the preliminary examination.

Registration Policies. Persons pursuing an academic degree and who are registered for 12 or more semester hours of credit during Fall and Spring are full-time students.

Students with an assistantship must register for a minimum of eight semester hours in the Fall and Spring semesters. International students on a visa must be registered for twelve semester hours if assistantship is 25 percent time. To receive a summer assistantship, students must register for a minimum of three semester hours. For some fellowships, Summer registration for a minimum of six (6) semester hours may be required. Failure to register for the minimum number of semester hours will result in the assessment of full tuition by the University.

Credit Non-Degree (CND) Students: Credit Non-Degree students may take courses at the School of Public Health for academic credit. Evidence of a bachelorís degree is required for CND enrollment. Up to 12 semester hours may be transferred into the Degree Program from the Credit Non-Degree Program. [Students who are admitted into a credit-bearing Academic Certificate Program are not bound by the 12 credit hour rule.] Students who expect to enroll as degree students at some time in the future generally register for one or more of the required core courses. Students without a previous masterís level degree are not allowed to enroll in courses beyond the 400 level. Credit Non-Degree students must also fulfill all prerequisites for courses. To make an appointment for advising before entering the CND program, call Ms. Judith Koruba Washburn at (312) 996-3832.

Registration

The registration period for all students, degree and non-degree, generally begins in the 12th week of the preceding academic semester. A specific date is established each semester for official registration and announced to students via the preceding semester's SPH Course Schedule. The registration of continuing students who have encumbrances from the preceding term will be prohibited until their debt to the university has been satisfied.

Adding Courses. Registration for most courses is by telephone. Students are issued appointments for telephone registration and will not be allowed to register any earlier. After that initial appointment, they may access the telephone registration system at their own convenience. Students should consult with their advisors before registering for classes. Certain courses, for example, Independent Study (IPHS 596) and Field Experience (IPHS 650), require consent of the instructor and on-campus registration through the SPH Office of the Registrar.

Late Registration. The late registration period is the 1st through the 10th day of Spring and Fall term (1st through 5th day of Summer). A late registration fee is automatically assessed to all students who register during the late registration period.

The maximum number of credit hours for which a student can register mainly depends on the student's level as follows:

Graduate = 20 hours, Fall, Spring and Summer Semesters

NonDegree = 18 hours, Fall and Spring; 10 hours Summer [Note, the SPH will place a "registration hold" on a nondegree student after 12 SH.]

Professional = no limit during any semester.

If a student attempts to register for hours beyond his or her maximum limit, the student will get a "Maximum Hours" error message via the phone registration that will block the addition of more credit hours for that term.

NOTE: Students may not add EPID 400 or BSTT 400 after the end of the first week of a semester.

Dropping Courses. Students will use the telephone registration system to drop courses. Students may drop courses for a partial refund through the 10th day (5th day for Summer) of the semester. Courses dropped before the 10th day (5th day for Summer) will not appear on the student's transcript. A final drop date is established each semester, which is printed in the schedule; typically the sixth week of the semester. Courses dropped after the 10th day (5th day for Summer), but before the final drop date will appear on the student's transcript as a "W". Students should pay particular attention to the refund policy published in the semester Timetable.

Registration and Dropping of Modular Courses

Modular courses are full-length courses that are offered within a compressed 8 week period during a semester. In the UIC Timetable, modular courses are indicated by the start and end dates, if available before print deadline. Regardless of what half of the semester the modular course is offered, a student must register for all modular courses during the regular registration period. The same Late Registration and Add/Drop policies also apply to all modular courses.

Other Types of Registration

Registration for Zero Hours: Master of Science (MS) students who have completed all course credit requirements but have not yet completed a graduation requirement (e.g., thesis, or project, or comprehensive examination) are not required to register. Students who are on a time-limited visa that requires their continuous registration must petition to register for zero hours in an appropriate course (thesis or project). Some departments require continued registration.

After passing the preliminary examination, doctoral candidates must register each semester (excluding summer). Except in highly unusual circumstances, leaves of absence will not be approved.

PhD students who do not hold a fellowship, assistantship, or tuition-and-fee waiver, and who have completed all degree requirements except the dissertation, must either:

A. Register for zero hours of credit in thesis research (any 599 course) each semester until the degree is awarded (excluding summer, unless defending dissertation); or

B. Pay a nonrefundable dissertation fee each academic year in lieu of further registration. This fee is equal to two times the amount for tuition alone required for zero credit (Range IV) at the time of payment. Students who elect this option are ineligible for student health insurance, library and laboratory privileges, computer facilities, an ID card, and loan deferment.

Students who hold a fellowship, assistantship, or tuition and fee waiver must register each semester for the number of hours required by their award, even if they have completed all degree requirements except the dissertation.

Permission to use either option A or B will be considered by the Graduate College for PhD students, and SPH Student Affairs for DrPH students, upon petition supported by the graduate program. For option B, the department must certify that no use of University facilities will be made. Students must refile a petition each academic year for Option B.

All students must complete and defend the dissertation by the degree deadline, regardless of which option is chosen.

Registration for the CIC Traveling Scholar Program: Students participating in the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) Traveling Scholar Program may register for courses offered at the following eleven member institutions:

University of Chicago
Ohio State University
Michigan State University
Indiana University
University of Wisconsin, Madison and Milwaukee campuses
Northwestern University
University of Iowa
University of Illinois, Chicago and Urbana campuses
Purdue University
University of Minnesota
University of Michigan
Pennsylvania State University

The Graduate College administers this program for the UIC campus, and interested students should consult the Graduate College Bulletin. In order to register at any of the universities, a student must:

Be currently enrolled in the Doctor of Philosophy or Doctor of Public Health degree program.

Obtain approval of the major advisor and the Office of the Dean at SPH.

Return the application to the Graduate College for approval. The Graduate College will forward the application to the HOST University. It is strongly recommended that application be made early in the semester preceding anticipated participation in the program.

All fees for CIC courses are paid on campus at University of Illinois rates.

Students must register for CIC 500 at UIC for the same number of credit hours they are enrolled at the host university in order to receive credit for the course work.

NOTE: Students planning a change of program in the CIC course selections (add/drop) must contact Edward Blaha, UIC's CIC liaison officer, at 312-413-2548 or Babette J. Neuberger, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, at 312-996-5381. Only graduate level courses at the HOST University will be credited toward degree requirements at The School of Public Health. Interested students must obtain quarterly/semester schedules from the HOST Universities. For more information visit the CIC Travel Scholar Website.

Registration for Courses in Other Colleges and Departments within the University System: SPH students may concurrently take courses at SPH and at other colleges or departments at UIC. Students may also register for courses at the Urbana or Springfield Campuses. The following should be noted:

Students who wish to take non-SPH courses must have the approval of their faculty advisors, and all students must have included such courses in their Program Proposals (or amend the proposal accordingly).

Telephone registration for non-SPH courses should be made at the time of telephone registration for SPH classes. The adding and dropping of courses may be made simultaneously. Please check with the Office of Student Affairs regarding complete withdrawals.

Auditors: Undergraduate and graduate students as well as persons not registered at the University of Illinois at Chicago are permitted to attend on-site courses other than laboratory, military, or physical education classes as auditors. To do so a Visitor's Permit bearing the approval of the class instructor and the dean of the college concerned must be placed on file at the UIC Office of Admissions and Records. Forms are available from the UIC Office of Admissions and Records and can be processed from the 2nd day to the 10th day of the semester. Auditors need not apply for admission to the University. No credit is awarded for audited courses.

An auditor is a listener in the class, not a participant. A person attending class as an auditor is not allowed to take an examination (including a proficiency exam) for credit, nor are computer facilities available. The names of auditors do not appear on class rosters. No instructor should admit auditors to any class unless the approved form is presented showing compliance with the conditions stated above. An auditor must pay the Course Auditors Fee if not registered as a full-time student. The fee is refunded if the person withdraws during the first 10 days of class. No refund is given for a later withdrawal. A student registered on a full-fee (Range I) schedule does not pay an auditor fee. University employees may audit courses without paying the fees if the following conditions are met: 1. recommendation by the head of the employing unit; 2. consent of the instructor; 3. approval of the dean of the appropriate college; 4. approval of the Personnel Service Office.

NOTE: Students, even currently registered SPH students, may not "just sit-in" on a course. UIC policy requires all students attending a course to have some official status as a registered student or as an auditor. Faculty are instructed to ask persons who cannot prove that they hold an approved student or auditor status (for that specific term) to leave their classroom.

Computer-Based Instruction

Certain SPH courses (including MPH core courses) are offered either wholly or in part through computer-based instruction. Entering students are strongly encouraged to adhere to the following technical requirements: http://www.uic.edu/depts/uionline/graphics/tech/tech.htm.

All MPH students will take at least one online course during their academic career at SPH, and a number of the SPH in-class courses utilize an online component (e.g., discussion board). Visit the SPH distance learning website for more information on online and hybrid courses.

Grades and Grading Policy

The definition of letter grades follows:

Grade Points Interpretation
A 5.0 Excellent; outstanding performance.
B 4.0 Good; completely satisfactory performance.
C 3.0 Fair; some problem with course material, but satisfactory performance.
D 2.0 Poor, unsatisfactory performance, cannot be used for credit toward graduation, but is calculated in the GPA.
E 1.0 Failure, unacceptable performance, cannot be used toward graduation, but is calculated in the GPA.
DF 0.0 Deferred; may be used for thesis courses, continuing seminar and sequential courses. At the end of the continuing course sequence, the deferred grade for all terms must be converted either to a specific letter grade (A-E), to an IN (Incomplete), or to an S or U in thesis research courses or specifically approved courses. When a student terminates a project in independent study, internship or research (e.g., by change of topic or advisor), outstanding DF grades must be converted immediately, even if registration in IPHS 596, IPHS 661, IPHS 598, IPHS 599, or IPHS 699 is continued.
S 0.0 Satisfactory; to be used as grade in thesis research courses, in zero-credit courses, and in specifically approved courses. No grade points are earned and the grade is not computed in the cumulative GPA. The S or U grade are used for IPHS 598, IPHS 599, IPHS 650, IPHS 661, IPHS 698, IPHS 699, and most seminar courses.
IN 0.0 Incomplete; may be given only if, for reasons beyond the student's control, required work has not been completed by the end of the term. An IN must be converted to a letter grade (A,B,C,D,E,F) by the end of the studentís first term in residence subsequent to that in which it was received or, if the student is not in residence, by the end of the twelve consecutive months subsequent to that in which the IN was received. An IN that is not removed by the deadline will remain on the record as an IN. NO EXTENSION BEYOND THE DEADLINE WILL BE PERMITTED. A course in which an IN was received and not removed by the deadline may be repeated for credit only once.
U 0.0 Unsatisfactory

 

Changing Grades After Official Notification

University policy permits an official change of a grade after one has been officially reported only when an error has been detected in the assignment of the original grade. No grade except IN or DF may be changed on the basis of additional or replacement work completed after the end of the semester, or by a change in the standard for grading. Any request for a grade change, other than to replace an IN or DF must be approved by the Senior Associate Dean.

Repeating Courses

If a student must repeat a required course, the course must be taken in the next semester that it is offered.

In calculating a Grade Point Average, all grades obtained that have been repeated are included in the average and appear on the student's transcript, although the credit hours of a repeated course are counted only once in satisfying graduation requirements.

No course may be repeated more than one time, with the exception of courses described in the SPH Handbook or catalog as repeatable or continuing activities. Courses taken at other campuses which duplicate completed SPH course work cannot be counted toward graduation requirements.


Standards of Student Performance

These are based on standards of the Graduate College as outlined in the Graduate College Bulletin.

Grade Point Average (GPA): As a minimum academic criterion, a student must maintain a cumulative GPA of at least 4.0 in all UIC 400- and 500-level courses. General transfer credit taken at other institutions is not computed in the cumulative grade point average. Grades earned at SPH as a credit non-degree student and grades earned through the CIC Traveling Scholars Program are included in the GPA.

Graduation: In order to graduate, the student must have a cumulative GPA of 4.00 or better.

Probation: If the cumulative GPA is below 4.0 after completion of 12 semester hours of credit, the student is placed on probationary status. Students who are in academic trouble must consult with their academic advisor. A student with less than 12 semester hours of credit and a cumulative GPA below 4.0 will be sent a warning letter.

A hold will be placed on the student's registration by the Office of Student Affairs if the student is placed on the probation list or probation warning list. A memo will be sent to the student and copied to the advisor and Division Director indicating the hold has been placed on the student's registration. The hold will be removed after the student meets with his/her advisor and the advisor contacts Renita Moore-Shannon, SPH Registrar, with instruction to remove the hold.

MPH and DrPH students must be in good academic standing to register for IPHS 650 Field Experience in Public Health or IPHS 661 DrPH Internship in Public Health. Students on probation will not be permitted to register for any course that is graded on an S/U basis.

Disqualification from further study: Students have two semesters of enrollment (including Summer, if registered), after the term on which they are placed on probation, to remove themselves from probation. If a 4.0 cumulative GPA is not attained, the student will be dismissed from the University. A student can petition for an additional semester.

A division may establish a higher standard of performance for courses in the major discipline. Division standards are published in the SPH Handbook and elsewhere as appropriate.


Transfer of Credit

The prime consideration for transfer of credit is whether the previous course work meaningfully contributes to a cohesive, goal-oriented, graduate program of study. Request for transfer of credit must be submitted with the initial submission of the program proposal. Deadline for submission of transfer requests is the same as the deadline for initial submission of program proposals. The request for transfer of courses, and the program proposal, must first be approved at the division level; and then both the program proposal and request for transfer of credits must be simultaneously submitted through the division's academic coordinator to CAP for approval.

All degree programs of the School of Public Health permit transfer of credit for courses taken before and during enrollment in the School, subject to the following criteria, limitations and procedures.

Consideration is given to the transfer of graduate work completed in accredited institutions, either those approved by one of the regional accreditation associations or those approved by the agencies recognized by the Council on Post-Secondary Education. The credit hours that may be transferred are determined on an individual basis. Only graduate work that meets the quality and content of courses offered at the University of Illinois is eligible for transfer. Consideration is given to the transfer of credit in three categories:

Graduate work for which a degree was not awarded.

Graduate work completed elsewhere after admission to the School and for which a degree was not awarded. Such courses should be an integral part of the student's degree curriculum, taken on the advice of the student's faculty advisor and with the concurrence of the Dean.

Graduate work completed in the senior year at UIC that was not applied to the baccalaureate. In the case of competency-based or pass-fail systems, the student must submit a letter from the instructor of record assigning a letter grade for the course to be transferred.

When there is partial overlap between a course proposed for transfer and a course to be taken at SPH, credit hours transferred may be reduced or disallowed.

Limitations on the transfer of credit:

Except for credit non-degree courses for MPH and DrPH students, only credits in which the student earned a grade of "A" or "B" may be transferred.

Students may transfer a maximum of twelve semester hours of credit earned as a non-degree student to the degree program (MPH, DrPH, MS or PhD).

For master's programs of 47 or fewer semester hours, no more than 25% of the hours required for the degree may be transferred. Credit hours earned as a credit non-degree student at UIC do not count toward this limit for MPH students.

For master's programs of 48 or more semester hours, no more than 50% of the hours required for the degree may be transferred. Credit hours earned as a credit non-degree student at UIC do not count toward this limit for MPH students.

Graduate work completed at UIC SPH in Credit Non-Degree (CND) status: Up to 12 semester hours of credit may be transferred upon a CND student's matriculation into an MPH degree program. This credit hour limitation does not apply to students who are officially admitted into a credit-bearing Academic Certificate Program. In the latter situation students should consult with the Certificate Program's director or academic coordinator for relevant policy.

Transfer of Credit at the PhD/DrPH Level:

A doctoral student who has received a relevant masterís degree may receive 32 hours of credit toward the minimum 96 semester requirement for the doctoral degree. In unusual circumstances, the student may petition for transfer of additional credit hours beyond these 32 hours.

Students seeking to transfer more than 32 semester hours of credit toward the PhD degree will be required to demonstrate that the additional hours were not taken in fulfillment of their masters requirements. For UIC students such documentation would include a letter from the studentís advisor and the division director and the studentís program proposal for the masters degree. Where the relevant course work was completed at another institution, the Graduate College requires certification from the registrar or college dean of the applicable institution stating that the courses are graduate level and were not used toward fulfillment of the requirements for a degree.

A maximum of 25% of PhD credit hours of course-work taken while a masters student, but not taken in fulfillment of the masters degree requirements (as determined by the masters program), may be transferred. Example: a student is given 32 semester hours of credit toward the PhD. The student is allowed to transfer an additional 16 semester hours of credit toward the PhD (96-32 = 64) (25% of 64=16).

Transfer of credit does not imply waiver of courses required for the degree program. The division may require that specific courses be taken which could increase the credit hours required for completion of the program beyond the minimum hours.

Other transfer rules for DrPH and PhD program students are as follows:

For PhD students with a prior master's degree, a total of 16 SH of additional course work from other universities or other programs at UIC can also be transferred if the courses were not used for degree credit. Grades of A and B are required for these courses.

For example, a PhD student who has taken eight semester hours of credit non-degree course work at SPH and sixteen semester hours at another university may transfer all eight hours of CND work and only eight hours of the course work taken at the other university.

Credit earned by PhD students through the CIC Traveling Scholar Program is considered as resident credit and not transfer credit under these regulations.

DrPH students with a masterís degree can transfer 12 SH of SPH credit non-degree course work. Such students may transfer an additional 16 SH of course work taken elsewhere - as long as such credits were not obtained as part of another program of study for which a degree was granted.

Doctoral students without a prior master's degree can transfer 24 SH of course work not previously used for any degree (25% of total 96 SH required for the doctoral degree). For PhD students, CND credit is included in the 24 SH; for DrPH students, CND credit is in addition to the 24 SH.

Time Limitations for Transfer Credit: Ordinarily, credit earned more than six calendar years before admission to the School of Public Health is not transferred (except in the case of doctoral students where credit hours are awarded for a completed master's degree).

Procedures for Transfer of Credit: Petition forms for transfer of credit are available from the divisionís Academic Coordinator. Two forms are used: SPH Petition for MPH & DrPH students; and the Graduate College Petition for Transfer of Credit for MS & PhD students. The following documentation must accompany each petition:

An official transcript showing the grade earned, if such a transcript was not submitted as part of the admission application.

Documentation that the course was a graduate level course: i.e., a copy of the relevant parts of the course catalog. If such documentation is unavailable or unclear, the student may submit a letter to the Division Director from the registrar of the university where the course was taken certifying that the course was at the graduate level and taken for graduate credit. Additional documentation may include course outlines, projects and reports.

Deadline for Submission of Petition for Transfer of Credit: Petitions for the transfer of credit for course work taken prior to matriculation must be submitted with the first submission of the program proposal (by the seventh week of class). No petitions for transfer of credit will be accepted after a studentís first year in a SPH degree program. The student is responsible for assembling all documentation and submitting it to the advisor and Division Director.

Transfer of Credit from the MPH Program to the MS Program: Students who choose to transfer from the MPH degree program to the MS degree program may transfer no more than 25% of the credits required for the MS degree for a masterís program of 47 or fewer semester hours; and no more than 50% of the credits required for the MS program of 48 or more semester hours. This is UIC Graduate College policy. Students who choose to transfer from the MS program to the MPH program can transfer all hours except research hours.

Transfer of Credit from the DrPH Program to the PhD Program: Students who choose to transfer from the DrPH degree program to the PhD program may transfer no more than 25% of 96 semester hours required for graduation.

Example: The maximum number of hours that a DrPH student with a relevant masterís degree, 12 semester hours of CND credit and 30 semester hours of credit earned while in the DrPH program may transfer is:

32 semester hours of credit for the Masterís degree and a combined total of 16 additional credit hours earned while a CND and DrPH student.

Students wishing to transfer from the DrPH to the PhD degree program are therefore encouraged to apply for transfer early in their academic program. This is UIC Graduate College policy.

Transfer of Credit from the PhD Program to the DrPH Program: Students who choose to transfer from the PhD program to the DrPH program may transfer all hours.

Transfer of Credit for Courses Taken after Matriculation at SPH: Procedures and regulations concerning transfer of credit for courses taken at other institutions as part of the student's program of study are the same as for courses taken before matriculation, and are detailed above.

Transfer of Credit for Courses Taken within the University of Illinois: Courses taken within other schools or colleges of The University of Illinois prior to matriculation may also be used to satisfy requirements for the degree program, subject to the same credit hour limitations detailed above for transfer of credit from other institutions. The primary criterion for transfer of credit is relevance of course work to the academic program in SPH. There are no limits for course work taken in other schools or colleges within The University of Illinois while the student is enrolled in an SPH degree program. The defining criteria are relevance to the student's academic program, and that it be a graduate level course. Approval is required only of the student's major advisor and Division Director as indicated on the program proposal.


Proficiency Testing for Credit

In addition to the possibility of transferring credit for an equivalent course completed elsewhere, or of obtaining a waiver of a required course, provision has been made for proficiency testing for credit for EPID 400 Principles of Epidemiology. (At this time, proficiency testing for credit has not been approved for any other course.) Proficiency testing for credit may be considered if one of the following conditions apply:

An equivalent course has been taken elsewhere, but it was either not for credit or the student obtained a grade of "Pass" in a pass/fail grading system, or

The student had substantially equivalent work experience in the absence of a formal course.

Procedure: A petition for proficiency testing for credit in EPID 400 must be submitted during the first half of the first academic semester the student has registered in the School of Public Health. The student should petition in writing to the Director of the Epidemiology-Biostatistics Division, with the written endorsement of his/her faculty advisor. The petition must be accompanied by evidence of the past practical or academic experience in the form of letters, transcripts, course syllabus, job description, etc. The petitioner will take an examination at the level of EPID 400 and must achieve a level of excellence equivalent to an "A" on that exam to receive proficiency credit.


Waiver of Core or Required Courses

A student may petition for waiver of one or more required courses in any of the degree programs if justified on the basis of the student's having taken prior course work of equivalent level and course content. In exceptional circumstances, experience may substitute for formal course work. Judgment on equivalency of either course work or relevancy of experience will be made by the course instructor and the Division Director of the division offering the course, who will base a decision either on evidence of equivalency supplied by the student or on a test--written or oral, or both.

Approval of a course waiver does not reduce the total number of credit hours required to earn the degree; rather, the student will have to take an equivalent number of credit hours, normally in the same division for which course waiver has been granted.

Procedure: Petition for waiver must be made using the form provided for this purpose. The form may be obtained from the division's Academic Coordinator. Request for waiver of a School-wide core course or divisional requirement must be submitted with the initial submission of the program proposal. Deadline for submission of the waiver request is the same as the deadline for initial submission of program proposals. The request for waiver of any school-wide core course or a divisional requirement, and the program proposal, must be approved at the division level. For waiver of School-wide core courses, both the waiver request and the program proposal must then be submitted simultaneously through the division's academic coordinator to CAP for approval. Where the petition for waiver is based on a prior equivalent course, the student must attach to the waiver petition a transcript showing evidence of having completed the prior course with a grade of A or B and a description of the course. A course description may include a copy of the course syllabus and/or a description from the college catalogue.

Students may appeal the denial of a waiver to the Division Director of the division offering the course.

No petitions for waivers will be accepted beyond a studentís first year in a SPH degree program.


Withdrawal and Leave of Absence

Withdrawal: Students who wish to discontinue studies without prejudice and in good standing, permanently or for some indefinite period of time, should address a letter to that effect to the Dean. (For temporary withdrawal, follow procedures for Leave of Absence as discussed in the next section.) If a student withdraws within ten days after the beginning of instruction, all fees except a non-refundable portion are refunded. A student who has withdrawn from the School of Public Health (and the Graduate College) in good standing, and who subsequently wishes to resume studies, must file a Readmission Application with the UIC Office of Admissions and Records. Readmission is not guaranteed.

If a student is readmitted after withdrawing from the School of Public Health, the curriculum and course requirements that are in effect at the time of his/her readmission must be adhered to and will remain in effect until the student graduates.

Leave of Absence: A Leave of Absence may be granted when a student wants to withdraw temporarily from the School because of illness or special circumstances which the student is unable to control. A request for leave of absence must be received prior to the beginning of the semester for which the leave is desired. It must be submitted by the student in writing, and must carry the signature of the faculty advisor and Division Director. Forms are available in the divisional offices for this purpose. If an extension of the Leave of Absence is needed, the extension must also be requested in writing. A request for Leave of Absence must be filed whenever the student plans to not register for more than one semester (fall or spring) plus the summer term. Time spent on a leave of absence approved by the program and the Graduate College is not counted toward the degree time limit. Doctoral candidates will generally not be granted leaves of absence after passing the preliminary examination. For further information, see the divisionís Academic Coordinator.


Graduation Procedures

Graduating students must comply with the following:

1. File Intent to Graduate Form. All students must apply for graduation by filing an Intent to Graduate form by the deadline established for the term in which they expect to graduate. The final dates for application are listed in the SPH Course Schedule each semester. Students shall also consult the divisionís Academic Coordinator the semester before graduation about submission deadlines. The deadline and procedures for MS and PhD students are governed by the Graduate College and are slightly different from those for MPH and DrPH students. Forms may be obtained from divisionís Academic Coordinator. The MPH/DrPH forms require the signature of the student, his/her faculty advisor, and the Division Director. The MS/PhD forms require the studentís signature, and that of the Thesis Advisor and the Director of Graduate Studies.

Advisor Evaluation forms are distributed with the Intent to Graduate forms. Graduating students are asked to complete these forms and return them to the Office of Student Affairs with the Intent to Graduate form. The Advisor Evaluations are reviewed by the Senior Associate Dean. Once the semester is over (and the student has graduated) these forms are given to the Division Director and then to the faculty member.

2. Program Proposal. A revised program proposal, reflecting the completed program of study, and signed by the student, advisor and division director must be submitted with the Intent to Graduate form to the divisionís Academic Coordinator.

3. Final Submission of Thesis. MS and PhD students should consult the Graduate College Bulletin for time limitations of final submission of the thesis. DrPH students should consult Ms. Judith Koruba Washburn, Office of Student Affairs to obtain this information.

4. Exit Interview. All graduating students must complete an exit interview. The interview should occur at the end of the last semester of enrollment before graduation. All graduating students are expected to have an exit interview with a designated faculty person within their Division. Results of the interview should be transcribed and submitted to the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs.

The purpose of the exit interview and advisor evaluation forms is two-fold:

Division Directors need first-hand opinions regarding student experiences. Since the satisfaction of students may be partially attributable to their relationships with faculty advisors, it is helpful for graduating students to complete the advisor evaluation form, providing insight into the relative strengths and weaknesses of their advisor/advisee relationship.

Students often have insights about the School which the general administration and teaching faculty fail to perceive. Cumulative opinions may have an influence on future SPH policy.

Commencement. The School of Public Health holds its annual Commencement ceremony each year in May. Commencement is the occasion for the recognition of graduates by the School and conferring of the degree. On this occasion, awards are presented to both students and faculty, and those students elected to the Delta Omega Honor Society are announced and recognized. In addition, graduates are hooded.

Dates of Graduation. The Commencement Ceremony at the University occurs only once a year. Since SPH students may complete all requirements for their degrees in any of the semesters of the year, those who finish their work in Summer or Fall Semester cannot participate in Commencement exercises until the following May. However, the Executive Committee of SPH (for MPH and DrPH students) and of the Graduate College (for MS and PhD students) will meet after the end of each semester to recommend such students for graduation. The degree earned is posted to the transcript approximately 2-4 weeks after the end of the term and diplomas are sent to graduates 8-10 weeks following the date of graduation.

Requirements for Spring Graduation. For students who expect to complete all work in Spring Semester, instructors are authorized to provide special examinations, make early review of written reports, or take other action necessary in order to provide course grades prior to Commencement. After these grades are provided to the SPH Office of Student Academic Services (MPH/DrPH students) or the Graduate College (MS/PhD students), qualified students may participate in Commencement.

Availability of Diplomas. For all semesters except Spring, diplomas are available for distribution eight to ten weeks following the date of graduation. Spring graduates may pick up their diplomas in the Universityís Office of Admissions and Records the week following Commencement.

Official Transcripts. Official transcripts for all degree programs are only available from the University's Office of Admissions and Records (M/C 018), Box 5220, Chicago, Illinois 60680. There is a charge for a transcript and transcript requests must be submitted in writing.


Informal Resolution of Student Grievances and Disciplinary Actions

Grievance Procedures

These procedures describe the informal process through which students may seek resolution of complaints or grievances arising from a decision made about them by an agent of the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC).

Academic Determinations

When grieving academic determinations, the student is advised to do the following:

Step one: Attempt to resolve the matter with his or her Division Director.

Step two: If satisfactory resolution of the matter is not achieved, the issue should be referred to the Committee on Academic Progress. (A committee quorum is required to hear a student grievance involving an academic determination.)

Step three: If the student is not satisfied with CAPís determination, the matter may be appealed to the Dean of the School of Public Health.

The following academic determinations are grievable:

*opportunity to take a second preliminary examination

*determinations relating to the thesis and dissertation proposal and defense

*other issues affecting a studentís academic standing except the following:

Absent an allegation of discrimination as defined below*, officially reported final grades are NOT grievable. University policy permits a change of a grade after one has been officially reported only in the instance when an error has been detected in the assignment of the original grade. No grade except IN or DF may be changed on the basis of additional or replacement work completed after the end of the semester, or by a change in the standard for grading.

Non-Academic Determinations

When grieving non-academic determinations, a student is advised to do the following

Step one: Attempt to resolve the matter initially with his or her Division Director.

Step two: If satisfactory resolution of the matter is not achieved, the issue may be referred to the Committee on Student Affairs (COSA). (A committee quorum is required to hear a student grievance involving a non-academic determination.)

Step three: If the student is not satisfied with COSAís resolution of the matter, the student may file a formal grievance in accordance with UICís Grievance Procedures (effective 3/22/89).

The Schoolís informal process does not stay the time-limit for filing a formal grievance under UICís grievance procedures (the clock continues to run). To initiate a formal grievance, a written statement describing the grounds for the complaint and the specific remedy sought, must be filed with the studentís division director within forty-five (45) days from the time of the occurrence leading to the grievance, or from the time when the Grievant should reasonably have been able to determine that the occurrence leading to the grievance might have affected his or her status.

The Office of Access and Equity must be informed of any grievance involving alleged discrimination as defined below.

* For purposes of these procedures, discrimination means: discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, national origin, ancestry, age, marital status, handicap, unfavorable discharge from the military, or status as a disabled veteran or veteran of the Vietnam era.

 

Disciplinary Actions

These procedures describe the informal process through which persons may seek resolution of complaints against students who have engaged in conduct giving just cause for discipline.

Academic Dishonesty

In cases involving clear proof of academic dishonesty, faculty should impose the sanctions appropriate under the circumstances. Appropriate sanctions include, but are not limited to, giving a failing grade for the assignment, paper, examination or the course. Faculty may seek further sanctions, such as probation, suspension, dismissal or expulsion of the student, by filing a disciplinary complaint against the student in accordance with campus Student Disciplinary Procedures.

In cases involving suspected academic dishonesty, faculty are strongly encouraged to issue a deferred grade (DF) and to initiate the informal campus Judicial Liaison Process. If satisfactory resolution is not achieved through the Judicial Liaison Process, faculty are encouraged to file a formal disciplinary complaint and incident report pursuant to UICís Student Disciplinary Procedure of the Senate Committee on Student Discipline (as revised: April 2001).

Non-Academic Causes for Disciplinary Action involving a Student

In all other cases involving a disciplinary complaint, the complainant may bring an informal complaint before the Committee on Student Affairs (COSA). (A committee quorum is required to take action on a complaint.)

If the complainant is not satisfied with COSAís determination, or if the complainant is seeking disciplinary action beyond the authority of COSA to administer, the complainant should file a complaint and incident report in accordance with UICís Student Disciplinary Procedure.

COSA is authorized to impose the following sanctions: warning, reprimand, fines or reimbursement, and recommended counseling, as these terms are defined in Section 3. of the Universityís Student Disciplinary Procedure.

The Schoolís informal process does not stay the time-limit for filing a formal complaint under UICís Student Disciplinary Procedure (the clock continues to run). To initiate a formal action, a complaint must be filed with the Office of Student Judicial Affairs no later than forty-five (45) days from the date of the alleged violation(s) or from the date the alleged violation(s) reasonably could have been detected.

 

Academic Dismissal Process

1. The Director of Student Affairs determines that a student has failed to satisfy probation requirements and must now be notified that his/her dismissal will be considered at an upcoming CAP meeting.

2. The Director of Student Affairs notifies the student of his/her status and procedures by a) phone and b) overnight letter. The director also notifies the studentís advisor by a) phone and b) a letter to the faculty mailbox.

3. The student has two options: a) accepting the dismissal or b) petitioning for extension of the probation period. The student needs to inform CAP in writing of his/her decision within five working days of receiving notification. This correspondence should be addressed to CAP and delivered to the director of Student Affairs. It is strongly recommended that the petition to extend probation be accompanied by a letter from the student's advisor indicating the advisor's
support of the student's petition (if in fact the advisor is supportive); and a letter from the student describing how he/she plans to resolve his/her academic difficulties if given the opportunity.

4. If the student accepts the dismissal, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs sends an overnight letter on behalf of CAP notifying the student of the academic dismissal. Dismissal results in cancellation of any current registration.

5. If the student elects to petition for extension of probation, the petition will be considered at the next CAP meeting, which will occur before the end of the late registration period for the following semester. The student has until five working days prior to the meeting to submit supporting documentation. The student may submit a written request to attend the meeting and may bring a representative of his/her choice. If the selected representative is legal counsel, CAP requires notification five working days prior to the meeting. All written correspondence and documentation should be delivered to the Director of Student Affairs. CAP may seek information from the studentís advisor, division director or other school faculty or staff.

6. At the meeting, CAP decides whether to a) accept the petition to extend probation, or b) dismiss the student. If CAP extends probation, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs sends the student an overnight letter on behalf of CAP stating the conditions of the extension. If CAP decides to dismiss, the Associate Dean for Academic Affairs sends the student an overnight letter on behalf of CAP stating the decision and the reasons for it. A written appeal of any decision by CAP may be made to the Dean within 30 days and must include a statement of the basis for the appeal and the remedy sought.

7. The CAP chair informs the Dean of committee actions by letter and reports such actions at monthly Executive Committee meetings.

 

Disabilities Requiring Accommodation

Students with disabilities requiring accommodation are responsible for providing timely documentation of their disability and their accommodation needs to their course instructors. Notice of special needs should be given before the semester begins or at the beginning of each term. Services, access, and reasonable accommodations can be arranged for students with various types of documented disabilities. Babette Neuberger, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, (312) 996-5381 and the campus Office of Disability Services, (312) 413-2183 (Voice/TT) are available to assist students with obtaining documentation and accommodation.


Research Involving Humans Subjects

Acronyms

DRC-- Department Review Committee (within the School of Public Health)

IRB-- Institutional Review Board

OPRS=Office for the Protection of Research Subjects

PI-- Principal Investigator

PR-- Primary Reviewer

Review of research protocol involving human subjects is a federally mandated, legal responsibility of the University of Illinois at Chicago. It is undertaken to ensure that the rights and welfare of human subjects involved in research are protected. Research protocol involving human subjects must be reviewed and approved before human subjects can participate in the research. Anyone conducting research that involves human subjects must comply with these rules.

Generally, projects that may require IRB approval include doctoral dissertations, master's theses, and field research. Field research that is conducted to satisfy the MPH field practicum requirement may be considered "human subjects research" UNLESS the student is carrying out the activities as an employee or intern of the preceptor site AND the student does not intend to use the results for publication or a presentation at a meeting open to the public.

OPRS has recently determined that a MPH capstone that is only submitted in writing to faculty reviewers and/or presented at a forum open ONLY to the SPH community will not require IRB approval.

However, MPH students who are planning to submit their capstone paper for publication or for presentation at meetings open to the public (for example, a regional conference) must seek the appropriate level of review through OPRS and the IRB as they may be conducting "human subjects research."

Your advisor will help you determine if your project will require approval by the Institutional Review Board (IRB).

Review of human subject research protocol is done according to the type of protocol submission.

If the research protocol is an exempt or expedited, the protocol is reviewed at OPRS by a few members of IRB Board.

If the protocol is a full review, the protocol is (1) submitted at the school level with review by the Departmental Review Committee (DRC) and (2) then submitted at the campus level for review by the Institutional Review Board (IRB).

The functions of the School of Public Healthís Departmental Review Committee are:

1. To consider the protocol's scientific merit and the qualifications of the researcher(s) and methodology; and

2. To thoroughly review the project to ascertain that it a) does not generate unwarranted risks, b) may provide beneficial and useful information, and c) provides satisfactory safeguards for the rights of the subjects.

The review process begins with submission of a protocol with the appropriate IRB forms.

How to Obtain IRB Forms

You can obtain forms from the following website: http://www.uic.edu/depts/ovcr/oprs/. For additional questions about the process, contact Senior Associate Dean, Dr. Sylvia Furner at (312) 996-5013.

A flowchart of the IRB submission process and a Student Reference Guide for conducting human subjects research may be found at http://www.uic.edu/sph under "Human Subjects Research".