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The Master of Energy Engineering at UIC Program


Can I work full time and earn a Master of Energy Engineering degree?

At UIC we offer you the opportunity to get a graduate degree in the exciting and growing energy industry and work during the day. Whether a recent graduate or a working professional, the Master of Energy Engineering program was designed to work with your schedule. All classes are held in the evening at 6 PM on the UIC campus – an easy commute from the city or suburbs.

Example content image using the class .alignleftWhat makes the Master of Energy Engineering program at UIC unique?

The program is a self-contained, fully accredited non-thesis program. Structured to meet the needs of working students each course is offered in 3 hour weekly evening sessions. Master of Energy Engineering courses are on a guaranteed availability basis which means you will not have to delay your studies once you begin the program.

Our dynamic course offerings are specifically designed with proprietary course material not found in any other program. As we created the Master of Energy Engineering courses, we asked major energy industry corporations what was important for their employees to know. Our curriculum is designed to meet energy industry needs and provides direct application to industry.

The energy industry from power production to storage to delivery is covered in this 8 course Masters program.

A Master of Energy Engineering degree prepares you to advance your career as an energy professional with the ability to work in many aspects of the energy industry.

Let a Master of Energy Engineering degree from UIC change your future.



The Master of Energy Engineering degree requires the completion of eight ENER courses of which at least three must be at the 500 level.

With approval from the program director the following courses may be used as a substitute: ENER 450, 494, 554 and 594. The requirement of at least three 500 level courses is mandatory.

Fall Courses

ENER 424 Industrial Energy Management and Conservation

Beginning course in energy analysis and auditing and builds upon the critical background established in the HVAC course. An overview of the energy industry, billing, economic analysis, deregulated markets and energy purchasing. Credit is not given fir ENER 424 if the student has credit in ME 424. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students, . Text: UIC Course Materials

ENER 429 Internal Combustion Engines

Introduction to engine types, characteristics and performance. Combustion processes in spark and compression ignition engines; combustion abnormalities. Credit is not given for ENER 429 if the student has credit in ME 429. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students.

ENER 501 Engineering Project Coordination and Management

Theory, strategy, and tactics of the use of project management including project planning, matrix management concept, and team meetings. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students. Text: UIC Course Materials.

ENER 553 Sustainable Energy Engineering and Renewable Energy

A view of the energy industries future from the perspective of emerging and alternative technologies. Examples include fuel cells, distributed energy, micro-grids, hydrogen energy systems and renewables. Prerequisite(s): ENER 451 and ME 205; or consent of the instructor. Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students. Text: UIC Course Materials

ENER 554 Nuclear Power Generation

Theoretical and practical aspects of nuclear power generation, operations, reactor design, power train design, licensing, regulation, health, safety, maintenance on new and existing plants. Prerequisite(s): ENER 451 and ME 205; or consent of the instructor. Text: UIC Course Materials

ENER 494 Special Topics in Energy Engineering

Particular topics vary from term to term depending on the interests of the students and the specialties of the instructor.

 

Spring Courses

ENER 420 Combined Heat and Power, Design, and Management

CHP systems construction, operation, economics and includes a student design project. Also, builds on previous courses in power plants, engines, HVAC, a stress on economic and software analysis, utility rates and regulations. Credit is not given in ENER 420 if the student has credit in ME 420. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students.  Text: UIC Course Material

ENER 422 Building Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning

Establishes the basic knowledge needed to understand heating and cooling systems, mass transfer in humidification, solar heat transfer in buildings, and psychrometrics. A computer design project will be completed. Credit is not given for ENER 422 if the student has credit in ME 422. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students. . Text: UIC Course Materials

ENER 450 Air Pollution Engineering

Establishes the basic knowledge needed to understand and design air pollution reduction equipment, particularly from large industrial and power generation plants.

ENER 451 Electric Power Generation

Thermodynamics and practical aspects of central fossil fuel fired electric generating plants. Focus on large steam cycle generating plants with discussion of geothermal and hydroelectric plants. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students. Text: UIC Course Material

ENER 552 Design of Energy Efficient Buildings

Emerging technologies in designing energy efficient buildings, including new code issues. Prerequisite(s): Open only to Master of Energy Engineering students. Text: UIC Course Materials

ENER 594 Current Topics in Energy Engineering

Particular topics vary from term to term depending on the interests of the students and the specialties of the instructor.

information provided by the Office of Programs and Academic Assesment.
Three (3) 500-level courses required for graduate standing.
Course Work Required Courses: ENER 420, 422, 424, 429, 451, 501, 552, and 553.

Any substitute courses to the above required courses must be approved first by the student’s advisor and then by the director of graduate studies.

 

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