Forensic Toxicology Program

College of Pharmacy
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Course Descriptions

Forensic toxicology courses have the BPS (Biopharmaceutical Sciences) prefix

BPS 570 Foundations of Forensic Toxicology 
2 hours
.  Survey of forensic toxicology, with emphasis on analytical and interpretive aspects; unique characteristics, underlying philosophies, ethics; analytical methods, nontraditional matrices, interpreting the significance of results.

BPS 573 Drug Identification Chemistry 
4 hours.
In-depth treatment of classes of commonly encountered drugs of abuse and the analytical methods used in their screening, identification and quantitation.

BPS 574 Forensic Toxicology 
4 hours
. In-depth treatment of techniques used in forensic toxicology, including specimen preparation, drug or toxin isolation, and analytical methods for screening, identification and quantitation; interpretation, reporting and testifying as to results.

BPS 587 Forensic Science Seminar
1 hour. Weekly seminar series on forensic science research and topics, especially those outside the core requirements. Presentations by students, faculty, and guests. Must be repeated for credit at least twice. Consent of Director of Graduate Studies required for registration.

BPS 588. Expert Witness Testimony and Courtroom Demeanor
3 hours. Trials, hearings, grand jury; expert vs. lay witnesses; personal and behavioral characteristics on the stand; results, reports and courtroom testimony; simulated trial testimony.

BPS 592. Forensic Science Internship
May be repeated for a maximum of 4 hours of credit. Students may register for more than one section per term. Placement in a forensic science or toxicology laboratory or setting, under the supervision of a faculty member, with an accepted research project and paper. Prerequisites: Consent of the instructor; BPS 580; min of 15 earned credits in the M.S. forensic science program

BPS 598. M.S. Thesis Research
Supervised thesis research. Maybe repeated for a maximum of 10 hours of credit in the forensic science program. A minimum of 6 hrs credit is required for thesis students in forensic science. S/U grade only. 0 - 16 cr hrs.
Prerequisites: Consent of student's research advisor. Acceptance of the proposed thesis topic and preliminary proposal by the thesis committee.

GCLS 500 Physiology
3 hours. Lectures in human physiology. Emphasis is on an integrated approach to systems physiology. Restricted to students enrolled in a graduate program offered through the College of Medicine or Pharmacy or Applied Health Sciences or in the Departments of Bioengineering or Biological Sciences, or consent of the instructor. Prerequisite(s): Mathematics, undergraduate physics, organic chemistry, or consent of the instructor.

GCLS 501 Biochemistry
3 hours. Fundamental properties of biomacromolecules, the thermodynamics underlying basic biochemical processes and the properties of enzymes, including the kinetics of operation, and regulation, illustrated with important examples. Restricted to students enrolled in a graduate program offered through the Colleges of Medicine or Pharmacy or the departments of Bioengineering or Biological Sciences or consent of the instructor. Prerequisite(s): Recommended background: Coursework in organic and physical chemistry.

GCLS 503 Cell Biology
3 hours. Advanced course on fundamental aspects of cell biology; basic concepts will be integrated with key examples which span gene, protein, cell, and tissue function. Credit is not given for GCLS 503 if the student has credit in BCHE 561 or ANAT 585 or MIM 585 or PHYB 585. Restricted to students enrolled in a graduate program offered through the Colleges of Medicine, Pharmacy, or Applied Health or the departments of Bioengineering or Biological Sciences or consent of the instructor.

PHYB 552 Translational and Applied Physiology
3 hours.
Continuation of GCLS 500 Physiology. Advanced physiological concepts emphasizing interactions of different organs and systems under normal and abnormal conditions. Review of compensatory mechanisms and clinical applications of physiology. Prerequisite(s): GCLS 500. Recommended background: Course work in biological sciences.

PCOL 501 Medical Pharmacology I
3 hours.
A lecture, conference and laboratory course on human pharmacology. Drug mechanisms, toxicities and kinetics are presented as a foundation to therapeutic application. This is a College of Medicine course that does not follow the regular academic calendar. Credit is not given for PCOL 501 if the student has credit for PCOL 425. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in GCLS 501 and grade of C or better in GCLS 503; or consent of the instructor.

PCOL 502 Medical Pharmacology II
3 hours.
Continues PCOL 501. A lecture, conference and laboratory course on human pharmacology. Drug mechanisms, toxicities and kinetics are presented as a foundation to therapeutic application. Credit is not given for PCOL 502 if the student has credit for PCOL 425. College of Medicine course that does not follow the regular academic calendar. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in GCLS 501 and grade of C or better in GCLS 503; or consent of the instructor.

Elective Courses

BPS 501 Biopharmaceutical Sciences I
4 hours.
First part of the fundamental didactic core courses in biopharmaceutical sciences including fundamental principles of pharmaceutics, pharmacokinetics, scientific ethics and research design. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in the biopharmaceutical sciences program; or approval of the department.

BPS 502 Biopharmaceutical Sciences II
4 hours.
Second part of fundamental didactic core courses in biopharmaceutical sciences; fundamental principles of cell and molecular biology and pharmacogenomics, pharmacodynamics including toxicology, research communication and regulatory processes. Prerequisite(s): BPS 501; and graduate standing in the biopharmaceutical sciences program; or approval of the department.

BPS 542 Pharmacodynamics of Substance Abuse
2 hours.
Considers the mechanisms of action, responses, pharmacokinetics and dependence factors of substance abuse. Emphasis will be placed on research strategies in studying the biological aspects of drug abuse. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor and a course in basic pharmacology.

BPS 588 Expert Witness Testimony and Courtroom Demeanor
3 hours.
Trials, hearings, grand jury; expert versus lay witness; personal and behavioral characteristics on the stand; results, reports and courtroom testimony; simulated trial testimony. Prerequisite(s): Approval of the department.

PCOL 430 Principles of Toxicology
2 hours.
Examines the toxic effects of drugs and chemicals on organ systems. Lectures emphasize basic principles, effects on specific organ systems, major classes of toxic chemicals, and specialized topics such as forensic and industrial toxicology. Same as BPS 430. Credit is not given for PCOL 430 if the student has credit for EOHS 457.