BS in Kinesiology Minor in Kinesiology BS in Nutrition Minor in Nutrition Undergraduate Research

Professional Certifications

650 Applied Health Sciences Building (AHSB)
Administration: Main Office, (312) 996-8055
kndept@uic.edu
http://www.ahs.uic.edu/kn
Head, Charles Walter, PhD
East Campus Student Office, (312) 996-4600
337 Physical Education Building (PEB)
Director of Undergraduate Studies, Mary Lou Bareither, PhD

Assistant Director of Undergraduate Studies, Karrie Hamstra-Wright, PhD
Director of Accredited Nutrition Programs, Jamie Sutton Shifley, MS, RD, LDN
Academic Advisor, Emily Walker

Academic Advisor, Viviana Kabbabe-Thompson


 

The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition offers four major concentrations that lead to the Bachelor of Science degree in either Kinesiology or Nutrition.

Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology:

  • Movement Science
  • Exercise and Fitness

Bachelor of Science in Nutrition:

  • Coordinated Program
  • Nutrition Science

 

BS in Kinesiology

The Bachelor of Science program offers two areas of concentration: Movement Science, and Exercise and Fitness. The focus of the concentration in Movement Science is to prepare students for graduate and professional programs in the health sciences, including medicine, movement sciences, nursing, pharmacy, physical therapy, and occupational therapy, among others. The concentration in Exercise and Fitness prepares students for careers in clinical, corporate, and community health and fitness settings as well as performance-based centers. It provides the fundamental background required to develop exercise and fitness programs for persons of all ages both healthy and disabled. This concentration assists students in becoming certified as health and fitness professionals.

Transfer Admission Requirements

Students seeking admission to the department as a transfer student must have earned a minimum of 36 semester hours (54 quarter hours) or more at another college or university and must meet the entrance requirements that are specified for transfer students. The minimum transfer grade point average for admission is 2.50/4.00. No more than 60 semester hours (90 quarter hours) of credit may be accepted as transfer work from a two-year college. Complete transcripts from all postsecondary institutions must be submitted in order to be considered for admission. International students must have a Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score of 80, with subscores of Reading 19, Listening 17, Speaking 20, and Writing 21 on the Internet-based TOEFL (iBT).

Degree Requirements—Both Concentrations

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Kinesiology degree from UIC, students need to complete University, college, and department degree requirements. The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition degree requirements are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Applied Health Sciences section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies.

University Writing Requirement          
Courses
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for
Inquiry and Research
3
Total Hours—University Writing Requirement
6
   
Kinesiology Common Core  
Courses
Hours

KN 100—Kinesiology and Nutrition: First-Year Seminar

2
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy I
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy II
5
KN 261—Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy
3
KN 335—Exercise Psychology
3
KN 352—Physiology of Exercise
4

KN 361—Biomechanics: Introduction to the Human Machine

3
KN 372—Motor Control and Learning
3
HN 196—Nutrition
3
Total Hours—Kinesiology Common Core
31

 

Degree Requirements—Concentration in Movement Science

BS in Kinesiology, Concentration in Movement Science Degree Requirements
Hours
University Writing Requirement
6
Kinesiology Common Core
31
General Education Core Requirements
21
Concentration Required Courses
53
Electives
9
Total Hours—BS in Kinesiology, Concentration in Movement Science
120
   

Kinesiology Common Core and University Writing Requirement
See previous section Degree Requirements—Both Concentrations.

 
   

General Education Core Requirements

 
Courses
Hours
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsa
5
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychologyb
4
Exploring World Cultures coursec
3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursec
3
Understanding the Past coursec
3
Understanding U.S. Society coursec
3
Total Hours—General Education Core Requirementsd         
21

a This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
b This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.
cStudents should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
dSome of the Concentration Required Courses count toward the University minimum of 24 semester hours in General Education Core courses. Please see the course list that follows.

Concentration in Movement Science—Required Courses

Courses
Hours
BIOS 101—Biology of Populations and Communitiesa
5
BIOS 220—Mendelian Genetics
3
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ia
5
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry IIa
5
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry I
4
MATH 180—Calculus Ia
5

PSCH 242—Introduction to Research in Psychology

3
   
Choose one of the following two-course sequences:
5
PHYS 105—Introductory Physics I—Lecture (4)a  
PHYS 106—Introductory Physics I—Laboratory
(1)a
 
OR  
PHYS 141— General Physics I (4)a  
PHYS 144—Problem-Solving Workshop for General Physics I (1)  
   
KN 452—Advanced Exercise Physiology
3

KN 465—Biomechanics of the Neuromusculosekletal Systems

3
KN 472—Movement Neuroscience
3
Electivesb—upper-level kinesiology courses (300- or 400-level courses).
9
Total Hours—Concentration in Movement Science Required Courses
53

a This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.

b Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.25/4.00 or greater are encouraged to complete the following courses in their senior year as part of the elective course work:

  • KN 398—Senior Research Seminar (3 Hours)
  • KN 399—Senior Research Project (3 Hours)

Concentration in Movement Science—Electives

Courses
Hours
Free electives
9
Total Hours—Concentration in Movement Science—Electives
9

 

Sample Course Schedule—Concentration in Movement Science

Freshman Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematics
5
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for  Academic and Public Contexts
3

KN 100—Kinesiology and Nutrition: First-Year Seminar

2
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychology
4
Total Hours
14
   
Spring Semester
Hours
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organisms
5
ENGL 161—Academic Writing I: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
MATH 180—Calculus I
5
HN 196—Nutrition
3
Total Hours
16
 
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I
5
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy I
5
KN 335—Exercise Psychology
3
Total Hours
13
 
Spring Semester
Hours
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry II
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy II
5
KN 261—Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy
3
PSCH 242—Introduction to Research in Psychology
3
Total Hours
16
 
Junior Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry I
4
KN 352—Physiology of Exercise
4
KN 372—Motor Control and Learning
3
BIOS 101—Biology of Populations and Communities
5
Total Hours
16
   
Spring Semester Hours
KN 361—Biomechanics: Introduction to the Human Machine
3
KN 452—Advanced Exercise Physiology
3
PHYS 105—Introductory Physics I
OR
PHYS 141—General Physics I
4
PHYS 106—Intro Physics Lab I
OR
PHYS 144—Problem-Solving Workshop for General Physics I
1
General Education Core course
3
Total Hours
14
 
Senior Year
Fall Semester Hours
KN 465—Biomechanics of the Neuromusculoskeletal Systems
3
KN 472—Movement Neuroscience
3
KN Elective
3
KN Elective
3
Elective
4
Total Hours
16
 
Spring Semester
Hours
BIOS 220—Mendelian Genetics
3
KN Elective
3
General Education Core course
3
General Education Core course
3
Elective
3
Total Hours
15


Degree Requirements—Concentration in Exercise and Fitness

BS in Kinesiology, Concentration in Exercise and Fitness Degree Requirements
Hours
University Writing Requirement
6
Kinesiology Common Core
31
General Education Core Requirements 24–26
Concentration Required Courses
47
Electives
10–12
Total Hours—BS in Kinesiology, Concentration in Exercise and Fitness
120
   

University Writing Requirement and Kinesiology Common Core

See previous section Degree Requirements—Both Concentrations.

 
   
General Education Core Requirements  
Courses
Hours
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsa
5
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychologyb
4
Exploring World Cultures coursec
3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursec
3
Understanding the Past coursec
3
Understanding U.S. Society coursec
3
One additional Analyzing the Natural World coursecd
3–5
Total Hours—General Education Core Requirements          
24–26

a This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
b This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.
c Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
d A laboratory course is recommended.


Concentration in Exercise and Fitness—Required Courses

Courses
Hours
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematics
5

KN 200—Statistical Methods in Kinesiology and Nutrition

3
KN 240—Instructional Techniques in Fitness
3
KN 243—Basic Fitness Assessment
3
KN 331—Sport and Exercise Injury Management
3
KN 343—Advanced Fitness Assessment
3
KN 345—Exercise Programming
3
KN 400—Business Principles for the Fitness Professional
3

KN 410—Aging and the Neuromusculoskeletal Systems

3
KN 441—Principles of Resistance Training
3
KN 442—Principles of ECG Interpretation
3
KN 448—Modifications in Exercise Programming
3
KN 460—Neuromechanical Basis of Human Movement
3
      
Choose one of the following:
KN 393—Undergraduate Internship in Kinesiology
OR
Upper-level kinesiology electives
6
Total Hours—Concentration in Exercise and Fitness Required Courses
47


Concentration in Exercise and Fitness—Electives

Courses Hours
Electivesa 10–12
Total Hours—Concentration in Exercise and Fitness Electives 10–12

a Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.25/4.00 or greater are encouraged to complete the following courses in their senior year as part of the elective course work:

  • KN 398—Senior Research Seminar (3 Hours)
  • KN 399—Senior Research Project (3 Hours)


Sample Course Schedule—Concentration in Exercise and Fitness

Freshman Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organisms
5
KN 100—Kinesiology and Nutrition: First-Year Seminar
2
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychology
4
Total Hours
14
   
Spring Semester
Hours
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
HN 196—Nutrition
3
General Education Core course
3
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematics
5
Total Hours
14
   
Sophomore Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
KN 335—Exercise Psychology
3
KN 200—Statistical Methods in Kinesiology and Nutrition
3
KN 243—Basic Fitness Assessment
3
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy I
5
Elective
1
Total Hours
15
   
Spring Semester
Hours
KN 240—Instructional Techniques in Fitness
3
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy II
5
KN 261—Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy
3
General Education Core course
3
Total Hours
14
   
Junior Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
KN 331—Sport and Exercise Injury Management
3
KN 352—Physiology of Exercise
4
KN 361—Biomechanics: Introduction to the Human Machine
3
KN 372—Motor Control and Learning
3
Elective
3
Total Hours
16
 
Spring Semester
Hours
KN 345—Exercise Programming
3
KN 400—Business Principles for the Fitness Professional
3
KN 441—Principles of Resistance Training
3
Analyzing the Natural World course
5
Elective
3
Total Hours
17
 
Senior Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
KN 343—Advanced Fitness Assessment
3
KN 448—Modifications in Exercise Programming
3
KN 442—Principles of ECG Interpretation
3
KN 460—Neuromechanical Basis of Human Movement
3
General Education Core course
3
Total Hours
15
   
Spring Semester
Hours
KN 410—Aging and the Neuromusculoskeletal Systems
3
KN 393—Undergraduate Internship in Kinesiology
OR
Two Upper-Level KN courses
6
General Education Core course
3
Elective
3
Total Hours
15


Minor in Kinesiology

The Minor in Kinesiology is open to Nutrition majors and to majors from other units and colleges. Students will be allowed to complete the minor area of study within Kinesiology if they meet the minimum GPA of 2.50/4.00 at the time of application. Students must submit a request form at http://www.ahs.uic.edu/students/KN. Students outside the College of Applied Health Sciences must also consult their home colleges about acceptability and applicability of Kinesiology course credit toward their degree. Registration for all KN courses is restricted to students in the College of Applied Health Sciences; therefore, students outside the College of Applied Health Sciences seeking a minor will need to register for the courses needed through the academic advisor in the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition. A minimum GPA of 2.00/4.00 is required for the minor field.


Prerequisites for the Minor
Hours
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organisms
5
Total Hours—Prerequisites for the Minor
5
 
Required Courses for Minor in Kinesiology
Hours
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy Ia
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy IIa  
5
KN 261—Applied Musculoskeletal Anatomy
3
 
A minimum of two courses from the following selected with an advisor:
6–7
KN 243—Basic Fitness Assessment (3)  
KN 331—Sport and Exercise Injury Management (3)  
KN 335—Exercise Psychology (3)  
KN 345—Exercise Programming (3)  
KN 352—Physiology of Exercise (4)  

KN 361—Biomechanics: Introduction to the Human Machine (3)

 
KN 372—Motor Control and Learning (3)  
KN 410—Aging and the Neuromusculoskeletal System (3)  
KN 441—Muscle Physiology (3)  
KN 448—Modifications in Exercise Programming (3)  
KN 452—Advanced Exercise Physiology (3)  
KN 460—Neuromechanical Basis of Human Movement (3)  
KN 465—Biomechanics of the Neuromusculoskeletal Systems (3)  
KN 472—Movement Neuroscience (3)  
KN 475—Movement Disorders (3)  
Total Hours—Minor in Kinesiology
19–20

a These courses are required for the BS in Nutrition; Nutrition majors must take substitute courses selected with an advisor to meet the minimum number of Kinesiology course hours required for the minor.


Enrollment Residence Requirement for the Minor

A student must complete at least one-half of the course work required for the minor field in enrollment residence at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

 

BS in Nutrition

The Coordinated Program in Nutrition combines the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education required didactic course work with the required supervised practice hours that prepare graduates to take the Registration Examination for Dietitians. The Nutrition Science program provides students with the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education required didactic course work. Upon completion of the Nutrition Science Program, students are eligible to apply for an accredited dietetic internship at another institution. After successfully completing a dietetic internship, students are eligible to sit for the Commission on Dietetic Registration examination to become registered dietitians. This program is also for students who do not wish to become registered dietitians, but instead plan to pursue advanced degrees in nutritional sciences, public health, allied health, or a professional degree in medicine.

Coordinated Program Concentration

Currently granted accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association (120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995; phone: (312) 899-0040, ext. 5400; http://www.eatright.org), the Coordinated Program requires students to complete six semesters of full-time study, which includes didactic classroom work in conjunction with over 1200 hours of supervised practice experiences provided at a variety of locations throughout the Chicagoland area.

The Coordinated Program prepares graduates for entry-level positions as dietitians in a variety of employment settings, such as healthcare institutions, government organizations, business, industry, and community health agencies. With experience or advanced education, career opportunities can be found in research, education, or private practice. The employment outlook for dietitians is projected to grow in the twenty-first century.

Dietitians provide nutritional care to people in health and disease throughout the life cycle in accordance with their nutritional requirements and food habits. Dietitians’ activities include the provision of direct inpatient and outpatient services as well as community program planning and evaluation, clinical protocol development, food service management, and research. Therefore, a dietitian must be knowledgeable in the biological and physical sciences, psychology, sociology, education, and management and must have expertise in food habits, food composition, food service, science of food and nutrition, energy and nutrient needs, program development and evaluation, and research methods. Dietitians counsel clients, as well as work with other members of the healthcare team in providing nutritional care in the clinical setting, and work with consumers in wellness programs and community agencies. Management of personnel, budgets, food operations, and consumer-oriented services in the food or healthcare industry are other areas for dietitians.

Nutrition Science Concentration

The Nutrition Science concentration prepares students for a future career as a registered dietitian, as well as for graduate study in nutrition, medicine, public health, other allied health fields, and dentistry. It is currently granted initial accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation for Dietetics Education of the American Dietetic Association (120 South Riverside Plaza, Suite 2000, Chicago, IL 60606-6995; phone: (312) 899-0040, ext. 5400; http://www.eatright.org) as a Didactic Program in Dietetics. The research and teaching is focused on the sciences of nutrition, physiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology and the application of knowledge in these disciplines to the maintenance of health and well-being of humans throughout their lives. The curriculum offers a wide range of courses on the nutritional, epidemiological, and behavioral aspects of human diseases, a broad perspective on human biology (including cultural factors), and a strong clinical orientation. Students who intend to become dietitians may choose to apply for an accredited dietetic internship outside of UIC to be completed post graduation. 

Transfer Admission Requirements

Students seeking admission to the Bachelor of Science in Nutrition programs must meet these minimum requirements:

  • Sixty semester or 90 quarter hours of acceptable academic credit
  • Minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.50/4.00 (However, currently the average GPA of students accepted into the Coordinated Program is 3.60/4.00, while the average GPA of students accepted into the Nutrition Science program is 3.40/4.00.)
  • Successful completion of the required prerequisite courses

The applicant’s personal characteristics, motivation, academic background, and work experiences are factors evaluated in selecting candidates for admission into the Coordinated Program through recommendations as well as written and face-to-face interviews.

Degree Requirements—Both Concentrations

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Nutrition degree from UIC, students need to complete University, college, and department degree requirements. The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition offers two major concentrations in Nutrition:

  • Coordinated Program
  • Nutrition Science

The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition degree requirements for both Nutrition concentrations are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Applied Health Sciences section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies.

Note: Students who do not place into certain courses or do not carefully plan sequential course work should expect to take summer session courses or possibly take longer than two years to complete the pre-nutrition course work. Students should seek advising from the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition for advice on course planning.

Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements

Courses
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
COMM 100—Fundamentals of  Human Communication
3
Understanding the Creative Arts courseb
3
Understanding the Past courseb
3
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychologya
4
SOC 100—Introduction to Sociologyac
3
STAT 130—Introduction to Statistics for the Life Sciences
4
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Id
5
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry IId
5
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry Ie
4
CHEM/BIOS 352—Introductory Biochemistry
3
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsd
5
BIOS 350—General Microbiologye
3
BIOS 351—Microbiology Laboratorye
2
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematicsf        
5
HN 110—Foods
3
HN 196—Nutrition
3
Total Hours—Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements
64

a This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.
b Students should consult the
General Education section of the catalog for a list approved courses in this category.
c This course is approved for the Understanding U.S. Society General Education category.
d This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
e Students are required to complete or be concurrently enrolled in CHEM 130 or CHEM 232 as a prerequisite for these courses. See CHEM 232 course description for more details.
f Completion of MATH 121 may be satisfied through placement exam or CLEP.

 

Degree Requirements—Coordinated Program Concentration

BS in Nutrition—Coordinated Program Degree Requirements
Hours
Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements
64
Coordinated Program Required Courses
76
Total Hours—BS in Nutrition—Coordinated Program
140

 

Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements

See previous section Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements for a list of courses to meet this requirement.

Coordinated Program Required Courses

Courses
Hours
HN 200—Nutritional Assessment
3
HN 202—Culture and Fooda
2
HN 300—Science of Foods
3
HN 306—Nutrition Education
4
HN 308—Nutrition Science I
3
HN 309—Nutrition Science II
3
HN 311—Nutrition during the Life Cycle
3
HN 312—Nutrition during the Life Cycle Practicum
2
HN 318—Genetic, Molecular, and Cellular Mechanisms of Chronic Diseases
3
HN 320—Clinical Nutrition I
4
HN 321—Clinical Practice I
2
HN 330—Quantity Food Production
3
HN 332—Food Service Management
2
HN 335—Food Service Practice
4
HN 413—Principles of Delivering Public Health Nutrition Services
3
HN 420—Clinical Nutrition II
2
HN 421—Clinical Practice II
4
HN 422—Clinical Nutrition III
2
HN 423—Clinical Practice III
5
HN 440—The Research Process
3
HN 450—Professional Practice
6
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy I
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy II
5
Total Hours—Coordinated Program Required Courses
76

a This course is approved for the Exploring World Cultures General Education category


Sample Course Schedule—Coordinated Program

Junior Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
HN 190—Introduction to Dietetics
1
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy I
5
HN 200—Nutritional Assessment
3
HN 308—Nutrition Science I
3
Total Hours
12
   
Spring Semester
Hours
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy II
5
HN 309—Nutrition Science II
3
HN 330—Quantity Food Production
3
HN 413—Principles of Delivery of Public Health Nutrition
3

HN 318—Genetic, Molecular, and Cellular Mechanisms of Chronic Disease

3
Total Hours
17
   
Senior Year  
Fall Semester
Hours
HN 300—Science of Food
3
HN 202—Culture and Food
2
HN 311—Nutrition during the Life Cycle
3
HN 320—Clinical Nutrition I
4
HN 332—Food Service Management
2
Total Hours
14
   
Spring Semester
Hours
HN 306—Nutrition Education
4
HN 335—Food Service Practice
4
HN 440—The Research Process
3
HN 420—Clinical Nutrition II
2
HN 422—Clinical Nutrition III
2
Total Hours
15
   
Summer Semester:
Hours
HN 321—Clinical Nutrition Practice I           
2
HN 421—Clinical Nutrition Practice II
4
Total Hours
6
   
Fall Semester:
Hours
HN 312—Nutrition during the Lifecycle Practice
2
HN 423—Clinical Nutrition Practice III
5
HN 450—Professional Practice
6
Total Hours
13

 

Degree Requirements—Nutrition Science Concentration

BS in Nutrition—Nutrition Science Degree Requirements
Hours
Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements
64
Nutrition Science Required Courses
56
Total Hours—BS in Nutrition—Nutrition Science
120

 

Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements
See previous section Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements for a list of courses to meet this requirement.

Nutrition Science Required Courses

 Courses  
Hours
HN 200—Nutritional Assessment          
3
HN 202 —Culture and Fooda
2
HN 300—Science of Foods
3
HN 308—Nutrition Science I
3
HN 309—Nutrition Science II
3
HN 311—Nutrition during the Life Cycle
3
HN 318—Genetic, Molecular, and Cellular Mechanisms of Chronic Diseases
3
HN 320—Clinical Nutrition I
4
HN 413—Principles of Delivering Public Health Nutrition  Services
3
HN 420—Clinical Nutrition II
2
HN 440—The Research Process
3
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy I
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy II
5
Electivesb
14
Total Hours—Nutrition Science Required Courses
56

a This course is approved for the Exploring World Cultures General Education category
b Elective courses will depend upon students’ postgraduation goals.


Sample Course Schedule—Nutrition Science

Junior Year
Fall Semester
Hours
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy I
5
HN 200—Nutritional Assessment
3
HN 308—Nutrition Science I
3
Electives
3
Total Hours
14
   
Spring Semester
Hours
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy II
5
HN 309—Nutrition Science II
3
HN 413—Principles of Delivery of Public Health Nutrition    
3
HN 318—Genetic, Molecular, and Cellular Mechanisms of Chronic Disease
3
Total Hours
14
   
Senior Year
Fall Semester
Hours
HN 202—Culture and Food
2
HN 300—Science of Food
3
HN 311—Nutrition during the Life Cycle
3
HN 320—Clinical Nutrition I
4
Electives
3
Total Hours
15
   
Spring Semester
Hours
HN 440—The Research Process
3
HN 420—Clinical Nutrition II
2
Electives
8
Total Hours
13

 

Minor in Nutrition

The Minor in Nutrition is open to majors from other units and colleges, including those in the BS in Kinesiology program, but not those students enrolled in the BS in Nutrition program. Students will be allowed to complete the minor area of study within Nutrition if they meet the transfer-eligibility criteria at the time of application (minimum GPA of 2.50/4.00). Students must submit a request form to the department (AHSB, Room 650). Students must also consult their home colleges about the acceptability and applicability of Nutrition course credit toward their degree. Registration for most HN courses is restricted to students in the department; therefore, students must register through a departmental academic advisor. A minimum cumulative GPA of 2.50/4.00 is required for the minor field.

Students must take the following courses for a minimum of 18 semester hours:

Nutrition Minor Required Courses

Courses
Hours
HN 110—Foods
3
HN 196—Nutrition
3
HN 200—Nutritional Assessmenta
3
HN 296—Nutrition and Physical Activitya
3
HN 307—Human Nutrition and Metabolismb
3
HN 311—Nutrition during the Life Cyclec
3
Total Minimum Hours—Nutrition Minor
18
   

Students enrolled in the BS in Kinesiology, which
already requires HN 196, must choose between one of the following courses to replace the hours for HN 196:

 
HN 300—Science of Foodsd
3
OR  
HN 202—Culture and Food (2)e
AND
HN 203—Culture and Food Lab (1)
3

a The prerequisite for HN 200 and 296 is HN 196.
b The prerequisite for HN 307 is HN 196 and one semester of college chemistry.
c The prerequisite for HN 311 is HN 307.
d The prerequisite for HN 300 is HN 110.
e This course is approved for the Exploring World Cultures General Education category.

 

Enrollment Residence Requirement in the Minor

A student must complete at least one-half of the course work required for the minor field in enrollment residence at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

 

Undergraduate Research

Undergraduate students are strongly encouraged to participate in research. A guided research project in either concentration can be one of the most valuable experiences of a college education. The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition offers the following opportunities:

Independent Study

KN 396—Independent Study in Kinesiology is designed to be a flexible course allowing juniors and seniors to gain experience in Kinesiology-related research. Taken for 1–3 hours, KN 396 requires close interaction with one or more faculty members over the course of one semester.

Senior Research Seminar and Project

The Senior Research Seminar and Project is offered as a capstone experience to students in both concentrations who have achieved a grade point average of 3.25/4.00 by their senior year of study. Eligible students complete the two-semester sequence by taking KN 398—Senior Research Seminar and KN 399—Senior Research Project. Typically, the first semester is devoted to developing and proposing a topic and obtaining any necessary approvals for the study (e.g., Institutional Review Board). The second semester consists of implementing, writing, and presenting of the research project. Students earn six semester hours of graduation credit. In addition to the grade point average requirement, all Senior Research Seminars and Projects require a faculty mentor.

Summer Research Scholarship

Promising students of sophomore standing or above who have demonstrated an interest in the research of Kinesiology faculty may apply to receive a Summer Research Scholarship. Recipients of the award will work closely with a principal investigator and graduate students in a Kinesiology laboratory on a project designed by the student and faculty member. Depending on the length and nature of the research experience, the scholarship may include a stipend, tuition waiver, graduation credit, or some combination of the three. If the student and faculty member desire, the work accomplished during this experience may be later developed into the student’s Senior Research Seminar and Project.

 

Professional Certifications

Courses in the Exercise and Fitness concentration have been developed to assist students in becoming certified as health and fitness professionals by organizations such as the American College of Sports Medicine, National Strength and Conditioning Association, National Academy of Sports Medicine, and the American Council on Exercise. For information on certification, please see each organization’s Web site.