Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Medicine, Pre-Occupational Therapy, Pre-Physical Therapy, and Pre-Veterinary Medicine Pre-Health Information Management, Pre-Nutrition, Pre-Nursing, and Pre-Pharmacy Pre-Urban and Public Affairs Pre-Law

 

309 University Hall (UH)
(312) 996–3366
http://www.uic.edu/las/college
Administration:
Dean, Dwight A. McBride
Senior Associate Dean, Emanuel D. Pollack
Program Coordinator, Preprofessional Studies, Candice Eisenhauer

 


 

Preprofessional studies in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences include course work that prepares students to apply for professional programs in a variety of fields. Students may pursue preprofessional studies in the following areas: Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Health Information Management, Pre-Law, Pre-Medicine, Pre-Nursing, Pre-Nutrition, Pre-Occupational Therapy, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Physical Therapy, Pre-Urban and Public Affairs, and Pre-Veterinary Medicine.

Preprofessional advisors are available to meet with students during individual appointment sessions and group workshops. Students interested in pre-health studies should visit the LAS Pre-Health Web site http://www.uic.edu/las/students/prehealth/ for information regarding upcoming workshops and other related information. Students can also find information regarding scheduling individual appointments with a pre-health advisor.

Preprofessional studies in Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Law, Pre-Medicine, Pre-Occupational Therapy, Pre-Physical Therapy, and Pre-Veterinary Medicine require students to complete an undergraduate degree program, including a major and preprofessional studies course work. In most cases, the bachelor’s degree is required prior to matriculation to the professional program. If admitted, students complete a professional degree program and graduate with a postbaccalaureate professional degree.

Preprofessional studies in Pre-Health Information Management, Pre-Nutrition, Pre-Nursing, and Pre-Urban and Public Affairs require students to complete two years of undergraduate study in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences prior to admission to the professional college. In some instances, completion of a particular program may take more time than anticipated if the student needs to satisfy prerequisites, or when a student does not take courses in the proper sequence. If admitted, students complete at least two additional years of undergraduate study in the professional college and graduate with a bachelor’s degree.

Preprofessional study in Pre-Pharmacy requires students to complete a minimum of two years of undergraduate study in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences prior to admission to the College of Pharmacy. A majority of the students admitted to the College of Pharmacy have completed a bachelor’s degree at the time of matriculation. If admitted, students complete four additional years of study in the UIC College of Pharmacy and graduate with a doctor of pharmacy degree.

Completion of preprofessional studies course work does not guarantee admission to a professional college. Students in preprofessional studies are strongly encouraged to consult an LAS preprofessional advisor and an advisor in the professional program before submitting an application. Each professional college has specific application procedures, deadlines, and requirements, which can change from time to time and may not be reflected in this catalog. Students are responsible for obtaining the most current information.

Students in preprofessional studies must plan their course of study with care. Advisors are available to assist students, however, the responsibility for selecting courses and meeting admission requirements rests with the individual student who must plan and select courses consistent with the program requirements.

Pre-Dentistry, Pre-Medicine, Pre-Occupational Therapy, Pre-Physical Therapy, and Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Preprofessional Studies
Preprofessional Studies Required Hours
Major
Bachelor’s Degree  Required for Admission to Professional College
Professional Collegea
Pre-Dentistry
90
Any
Yes
UIC College of Dentistry
Pre-Medicine
59–63
Any
Yes
UIC College of Medicine
Pre-Occupational Therapy
35
Any
Yes
UIC College of Applied Health Sciences
Pre-Physical Therapy
50
Any
Yes
UIC College of Applied Health Sciences
Pre-Veterinary Medicine
78–83
Any
Yesb
UIUC College of Veterinary Medicine

a Although the prerequisites for admission to professional programs are those for University of Illinois professional colleges, students interested in other institutions should consult those programs for their requirements.
b Students should visit the program Web site for information regarding applying without a bachelor’s degree http://vetmed.illinois.edu/index.html.

 

Pre-Dentistry

Pre-dentistry students may choose any major, but should work with a preprofessional advisor to plan a course of study that fulfills the pre-dentistry studies requirements as well as the requirements for the major. Preference is given to candidates who have a strong science foundation.

The table below lists the minimum course work required to apply for admission to the College of Dentistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Pre-dentistry requires a minimum of 90 semester hours of undergraduate course work, excluding physical education and basic military science, distributed as follows:

Coursesa
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsb
5
BIOS 101—Biology of Populations and Communitiesb
5
   
One of the following general chemistry sequences:
10
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry II (5)b  
OR  
CHEM 116—Honors General Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 118—Honors General Chemistry II (5)b  
   
AND, the following organic chemistry sequence:      
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry I
4
CHEM 233—Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
1
CHEM 234—Organic Chemistry II (optional, but preferred)
4
   
One of the following physics sequences:
8–10
PHYS 105—Introductory Physics I—Lecture (4)bc  
PHYS 106—Introductory Physics I—Laboratory (1)bc  
PHYS 107—Introductory Physics II—Lecture (4)bc  
PHYS 108—Introductory Physics II— Laboratory (1)bc  
OR  
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) (4)b  
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) (4)b  
   
Electives to complete the required total of 90 semester hoursd
Varies
Total Hours—Pre-Dentistry
90

a If basic-level biological sciences, chemistry, and physics course requirements are satisfied with AP credit, students must then take the specified number of credit hours in each area from upper-level science courses.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
c Each of the following pairs of courses will be considered one course in meeting the LAS General Education requirements: PHYS 105/106; PHYS 107/108.
d Highly recommended electives include the following: human anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, humanities, and social science courses, some of which may count toward the General Education requirements. Students should consult their college and department sections of the catalog for information on General Education in the degree program as well as the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved General Education courses in each category.


The College of Dentistry requires that all prerequisite science courses include labs. Additionally, all required prerequisite courses taken must be a grade of C or better. Please note that a baccalaureate degree is required to matriculate into the DMD program at the College of Dentistry. Furthermore, the College of Dentistry gives strong preference to applicants who have taken three to four of the following science courses beyond the above minimum: human anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, microbiology, cell biology, histology, immunology, and genetics.

In addition to the course work listed above, applicants to the College of Dentistry must also take the Dental Admission Test (DAT). The DAT is offered through the American Dental Association (ADA). For more information on the DAT, please see the ADA Web site http://www.ada.org/prof/ed/testing/dat/index.asp. Applicants to the College of Dentistry must apply through a centralized application service sponsored by the American Dental Education Association (ADEA). For more information on the Associated American Dental Schools Application Service (AADSAS) please visit the following Web site https://portal.aadsasweb.org/.

Students may obtain information regarding the DAT and AADSAS by attending a workshop sponsored by the pre-health advising staff in LAS. First-year students are required to attend an advising session with a general LAS advisor. Once students have entered their sophomore year at UIC, they may request an appointment with a pre-health advisor once a semester. Students are advised to declare an educational goal of pre-dentistry upon entering UIC which will alert them to specific workshops and other pertinent information. The LAS college office also provides a service for collecting letters of recommendation that are required in support of the dental school application.

Students are strongly encouraged to select an undergraduate major and begin fulfilling their degree requirements as they complete their pre-dentistry studies. To obtain a degree in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, pre-dentistry students must satisfy all degree requirements of the college, including a major field.

In addition to the academic requirements, pre-dental students at UIC are strongly encouraged to become active members of the UIC Pre-Dental Club, obtain research experience, and preprofessional experiences in dental practices which may include but are not limited to shadowing a private practitioner, working as a dental assistant, working as a dental lab technician, observing in a public health dental clinic, etc.

The pre-dentistry program described above includes the minimum courses for application to the UIC College of Dentistry. Specific admission requirements of other dental schools are listed in The Official Guide to Dental Schools, which is published by the American Dental Education Association, 1400 K. Street, N.W., Washington, D.C. 20005. Information on dental schools is also available at: http://www.adea.org/dental_education_pathways/educational_resources/Pages/ADEAOfficialGuidetoDentalSchools.aspx.

Students admitted to a U.S. accredited college of dentistry before earning a bachelor’s degree may be eligible to complete the baccalaureate by transferring credit from the first year of study in dental school. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences accepts a total of 32 semester hours of credit from an accredited college of dentistry to enable a student to complete the requirements for a bachelor’s degree, provided that the following conditions are met:

  1. The student is in good standing in the college of dentistry;
  2. The course work taken in the college of dentistry does not duplicate previous course work;
  3. The courses are in fields such as biochemistry, physiology, histology, or anatomy as approved by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences;
  4. The student satisfies the enrollment residence requirement by completing at UIC at least the last 60 semester hours prior to entry into a college of dentistry;
  5. The student meets all other requirements for graduation from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, including a major field and a 2.00/4.00 GPA in all course work taken at UIC and other institutions.


Pre-Medicine

Pre-medicine students may choose any major, but should work with a preprofessional advisor to plan a course of study that fulfills pre-medicine studies requirements as well as the requirements for the major. Students who want to apply for admission to the College of Medicine at the University of Illinois at Chicago must complete a bachelor’s degree by the time of matriculation.

A pre-medical program must include the following minimum science preparation:

Coursesa
Hours
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsb
5
BIOS 101—Biology of Populations and Communitiesb
5
 
One of the following general chemistry sequences:
10
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry II (5)b
 
OR  
CHEM 116—Honors General Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 118—Honors General Chemistry II (5)b  
   
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry I
4
CHEM 233—Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
1
CHEM 234—Organic Chemistry IIe
4
   
One of the following physics sequences:
8–10
PHYS 105—Introductory Physics I—Lecture (4)bc  
PHYS 106—Introductory Physics I— Laboratory (1)bc  
PHYS 107—Introductory Physics II—Lecture (4)bc  
PHYS 108—Introductory Physics II— Laboratory (1)bc
 
OR  
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) (4)b  
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) (4)b  
   
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematics (Recommended)
5
MATH 180—Calculus I (Recommended)
5
Three courses chosen from the disciplines of anthropology, psychology, and/or sociologyd
9–10
   
At least one of the following courses:
3–5
200-, 300-, or 400-level biology course—biochemistry, physiology, mammalian histology, comparative vertebrate anatomy, or molecular genetics course  
Total Hours—Pre-Medicine
59–63

a Students completing a bachelor’s degree at UIC must fulfill all the requirements of an undergraduate degree program, including General Education requirements. Students should consult their college and department sections of the catalog for information on completing their degree programs, including General Education requirements.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
c Each of the following pairs of courses will be considered one course in meeting the LAS General Education requirements: PHYS 105/106; PHYS 107/108.
d Students completing a bachelor’s degree at UIC should consult the General Education section of the catalog and their academic advisor to select courses in anthropology, psychology, and/or sociology that are approved for General Education. Two of the three courses must be in the same field of study.
e One course of introductory biochemistry may substitute for the second organic chemistry. However, this subsitution may not be accepted by other medical schools. Students are strongly encouraged to complete the entire organic chemistry sequence at UIC.


In addition to the course work listed above, applicants to the College of Medicine must take the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) and apply using the centralized application services (AMCAS or AACOMAS) sponsored by the Association of American Medical Colleges and American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. The MCAT should be taken after completion of the minimum pre-medical course requirements.

Students may obtain information regarding the MCAT and AMCAS by attending a workshop sponsored by the pre-health advising staff in LAS. Individual appointments with a pre-health advisor are available to students who have completed the first year of general chemistry and general biology. Until that point, students are highly encouraged to meet with an LAS advisor. Students are advised to declare an educational goal of pre-medicine upon entering UIC which will alert them to specific workshops and other pertinent information. The college office also provides a service for collecting letters of recommendation that are required in support of the application.

The list of courses above includes the minimum courses required for application to the UIC College of Medicine. Specific admission requirements of other medical schools are listed in Medical School Admission Requirements, which is published by the Association of American Medical Colleges, One Dupont Circle N.W., Washington, D.C. 20036 and can be ordered through their Web site at http://www.aamc.org/medicalschools.htm.

Most medical schools, including the University of Illinois, will only accept students with bachelor’s degrees. However, students admitted to a college of medicine prior to completion of the bachelor’s degree may be eligible to receive the baccalaureate upon satisfactory completion of the first year in a U.S. accredited medical school. The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences accepts a total of 32 semester hours of credit from an accredited college of medicine to enable a student to complete the requirements for a bachelor’s degree, provided that the following criteria are met:

  1. The student is in good standing in the college of medicine;
  2. The work taken in the college of medicine does not duplicate previous work;
  3. The courses are in fields such as biochemistry, physiology, histology, or anatomy as approved by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences;
  4. The student satisfies the enrollment residence requirement by completing at UIC at least the last 60 semester hours prior to entry into a college of medicine;
  5. The student meets all other requirements for graduation from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, including a major field and a 2.00/4.00 cumulative GPA in all course work taken at UIC and other institutions.


Pre-Occupational Therapy

Occupational therapists provide services to maximize the function and satisfaction of persons whose daily life performance has been interrupted and jeopardized by disease, disability, life stress, and other factors. The occupational therapist provides the individual with opportunities for involvement in carefully chosen work, play, or self-care activities. The occupational therapist also uses various methods of mutual problem solving, environmental modification, adaptive devices, technology, and biomechanical and sensorimotor treatment methods to support and enhance performance.

Many occupational therapists work within hospital settings, but there is growing emphasis on prevention and treatment of the disabled in nonclinical settings. As a result, many new areas of employment are now available. For example, occupational therapists are increasingly employed in school systems where they work with handicapped children, enhancing their ability to perform as students. Working with in-home health organizations, occupational therapists help individuals and families function more adequately at daily tasks. In industrial settings, they aid disabled or injured workers’ return to gainful employment. In addition, occupational therapists have developed private practices.

The preprofessional course work listed below prepares students to apply to the professional program in the Department of Occupational Therapy in the College of Applied Health Sciences after completion of the undergraduate degree. Students should contact OTDept@uic.edu or (312) 413-0124 for further information.

Pre-occupational therapy students may choose any major but should work with an advisor to plan a course of study that fulfills pre-occupational therapy studies requirements as well as the requirements for the major.

The pre-occupational therapy requirements follow and should be completed as part of the undergraduate degree program. The courses listed below must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Coursesa Hours
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsb
5
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy Icd
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy IIcd
5
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychologye
4
PSCH 242—Introduction to Research in Psychology
3
PSCH 270—Abnormal Psychologyde
3
PSCH 320—Developmental Psychologyd
3
PSCH 343—Statistical Methods in Behavioral Science
4
One course in anthropology or sociology
3
Although not required, it is recommended that students complete a medical terminology course. Alternatively, students are expected to complete a self-study computerized course in medical terminology upon acceptance.  
Total Hours—Pre-Occupational Therapy
35

a Students completing an undergraduate degree at UIC must complete the General Education requirements. Students should consult the General Education section and their college/department sections of the catalog for more information on fulfilling these requirements.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
c KN 251/252 sequence begins in the fall semester only.
d These courses must be taken within five years of admission to the program.
e This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.

Other minimum admissions requirements include an earned bachelor’s degree in any field, CPR (cardiopul-monary resuscitation) certification with Health Providers Status, 3.00/4.00 GPA for the last 60 semester hours earned for the baccalaureate degree, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) score of at least 1000 combined verbal and quantitative parts, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement. Applicants with a GPA of below 3.00 or GRE score below 1000 who display strengths in other areas may be considered for admission. Students must apply for admission to the program approximately one year before planned enrollment.


Pre-Physical Therapy

Physical therapy is a health profession whose primary purpose is the promotion of optimal human health and function through the application of scientific principles to prevent, identify, assess, correct, or alleviate acute or prolonged movement dysfunction. Physical therapy encompasses areas of specialized competence and includes the development of new principles and applications to more effectively meet existing and emerging health needs. Other professional activities that serve the purpose of physical therapy are research, education, consultation, and administration.

The physical therapist, working in cooperation with other health professionals, serves the individual needs of the client and the health needs of society. The physical therapy profession depends heavily on knowledge and application of the basic medical and behavioral sciences, coupled with specialized knowledge and skills in the clinical arts and sciences.

Physical therapists may work as staff, supervisors, or self-employed practitioners who serve clients directly; as administrators of clinical departments, health agencies, or educational programs; as healthcare agency consultants; as clinical or academic teachers; or as researchers.

They may work in hospitals, clinics, rehabilitation centers, schools for handicapped children, neighborhood health centers, physicians’ offices, nursing homes and convalescent centers, private and public health agencies, sports settings, and universities.

Pre-physical therapy students may choose any major but should work with an advisor to plan a course of study that fulfills the pre-physical therapy studies requirements as well as the requirements for the major. Individual appointments with a pre-health advisor are available to students who have completed the first year of general chemistry and general biology. Until that point, students are highly encouraged to meet with a LAS advisor. Students are advised to declare an educational goal of pre-physical therapy upon entering UIC which will alert them to specific workshops and other pertinent information.

The pre-physical therapy requirements follow and should be completed as part of the undergraduate degree program.

Coursesa
Hours
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsb
5
   
One of the following general chemistry sequences:
10
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry II (5)b
 
OR  
CHEM 116—Honors General Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 118—Honors General Chemistry II (5)b  
   
MATH 180—Calculus I
5
PHYS 105—Introductory Physics I—Lecturebc
4
PHYS 106—Introductory Physics I—Laboratorybc
1
PHYS 107—Introductory Physics II—Lecturebc
4
PHYS 108—Introductory Physics II—Laboratorybc
1
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychologyd
4
PSCH 242—Introduction to Research in Psychology
3
   
One course in developmental or abnormal psychology, choose from the following:
3
PSCH 270—Abnormal Pscychology (3)d  
PSCH 320—Developmental Psychology (3)  
   
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy Ie
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy IIe
5
Total Hours—Pre-Physical Therapy
50

a Students completing an undergraduate degree at UIC must complete the General Education requirements. Students should consult the General Education section and their college/department sections of the catalog for more information on fulfilling these requirements.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
c Each of the following pairs of courses will be considered one course in meeting the LAS General Education requirements: PHYS 105/106; PHYS 107/108.
d This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.
e KN 251/252 sequence begins in the fall semester only.


In addition, applicants must complete a minimum of 45 hours of documented volunteer or observation experiences in three different physical therapy facilities; at least 15 hours must be completed at each facility. Current certification in CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation) with Health Provider Status is recommended prior to beginning the professional program. Students must also have earned a bachelor’s degree prior to enrolling in the program.

The minimum GPA for application to the program in physical therapy is 2.50/4.00 in science and nonscience courses. The competitive GPA, however, is considerably above this level. The Graduate Record Examination (GRE) must be taken within five years of the date of application. Students must apply for admission to the program approximately one year before planned enrollment.

There are two parts to the application: the online application and a supplemental set of materials. Applicants to the DPT program must apply online using the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS). Applicants can begin their PTCAS application in August. The PT program application deadline is October 15th. The supplemental materials must be sent directly to the Department of Physical Therapy and postmarked by the October 15 deadline. To learn more about the PTCAS application process, please visit the PTCAS Web site at http://www.ptcas.org.


Pre-Veterinary Medicine

Pre-veterinary medicine students may choose any major, but should work with a preprofessional advisor to plan a course of study that fulfills the pre-veterinary medicine studies requirements as well as the requirements for the major.

The program listed below includes the minimum course work required to apply for admission to the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Students desiring to apply should consult the program Web site to review the two different plans in which students can complete the prerequisite courses. A recommended program of 78–83 semester hours, exclusive of physical education and basic military science, can be distributed as follows:

Coursesa
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsb
5
BIOS 101—Biology of Populations and Communitiesb
5
Upper-level biology courses
12
   
One of the following general chemistry sequences:
10
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry II (5)b
 
OR  
CHEM 116—Honors General Chemistry I (5)b  
CHEM 118—Honors General Chemistry II (5)b  
   
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry I
4
CHEM 233—Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
1
CHEM 234—Organic Chemistry II
4
CHEM 452—Biochemistry I
4
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematics
5
MATH 180—Calculus I (Recommended)b
5
PHYS 105—Introductory Physics I—Lecturebc
4
PHYS 106—Introductory Physics I—Laboratorybc
1
PHYS 107—Introductory Physics II—Lecturebc
4
PHYS 108—Introductory Physics II—Laboratorybc
1
Humanitiesad
6
Social sciencesad
6
Total Hours—Pre-Veterinary Medicine
78–83

a Students completing an undergraduate degree at UIC must complete the General Education requirements. Students should consult the General Education section and their college/department sections of the catalog for more information on fulfilling these requirements.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
c Each of the following pairs of courses will be considered one course in meeting the LAS General Education requirements: PHYS 105/106; PHYS 107/108.
d Students should meet with their academic advisor to select courses in the humanities and social sciences that are approved for the Exploring World Cultures, Understanding the Creative Arts, Understanding the Individual and Society, Understanding the Past, and Understanding U.S. Society General Education categories.


Applicants are also encouraged to obtain work experience in the field of veterinary medicine.

In addition to the course work listed above, applicants to the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The GRE should be taken after completion of the minimum pre-veterinary medicine course requirements. Students may obtain an application information packet from the College of Veterinary Medicine that includes an application. Information on the GRE can be obtained from Testing Services, 1070 SSB. The minimum GPA for admission to the UIUC College of Veterinary Medicine is 2.50/4.00. The competitive average, however, is considerably above this level at the present time.

Applicants to the UIUC College of Veterinary Medicine must apply through the centralized application service (VMCAS) sponsored by the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges. Students may obtain information regarding the VMCAS by attending a workshop sponsored by the pre-health advising staff in LAS. Individual appointments with a pre-health advisor are available to students who have completed the first year of general chemistry and general biology. Until that point, students are highly encouraged to meet with an LAS advisor. Students are advised to declare an educational goal of pre-veterinary medicine upon entering UIC which will alert them to specific workshops and other pertinent information.

The list of courses above includes the recommended courses for application to the UIUC College of Veterinary Medicine. Specific admission requirements of other veterinary medical schools are listed in Veterinary Medical School Admission Requirements, which is published by the Association of American Veterinary Medical Colleges and may be ordered through the Purdue University Press http://www.thepress.purdue.edu.

Although the minimum requirement for application to the College of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is two years of college credit, few students are admitted at that point. Many students complete at least three years prior to acceptance, and most students have earned a bachelor’s degree.



Pre-Health Information Management, Pre-Nutrition, Pre-Nursing, and Pre-Pharmacy


Preprofessional Studies

Preprofessional Studies Required Hours

UIC Professional College

Professional Degree Program

Pre-Health Information Management

60

College of Applied Health Sciences

BS in Health Information Management

Pre-Nursing

57

College of Nursing

BS in Nursing

Pre-Nutrition

64

College of Applied Health Sciences

BS in Human Nutrition

Pre-Pharmacy

72

College of Pharmacy

Doctor of Pharmacy


Preprofessional studies in these health sciences areas require two years of undergraduate study prior to matriculation in the professional program. If admitted to the professional program, pre-health information management, pre-nutrition, and pre-nursing students complete the bachelor’s degree in the professional college, and pre-pharmacy students complete the doctor of pharmacy degree in the College of Pharmacy.


Pre-Health Information Management

Health information administrators are responsible for the management of health information systems consistent with the medical, administrative, ethical, and legal requirements of the healthcare delivery system. They process patient data, design and implement systems that will accurately record this information and make it readily retrievable, and develop and maintain quality assurance programs to assist the healthcare team in monitoring all healthcare activities.

The administrator also provides medical information to qualified users and safeguards confidential patient data. Administrative duties assigned to this health professional include responsibility for subordinate personnel, capital equipment selection, systems design and analysis, hospital committee activities, and budget management.

Students acquire knowledge of medical science, disease classification and coding, record management, health information systems, information technology, and organization and management. Course work is integrated with clinical practice experience in the health information management departments of affiliated hospitals, so that the student can develop the organizational and managerial skills required to administer an efficient health information management department.

The preprofessional course work listed below prepares the student to apply to the Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management program offered in the College of Applied Health Sciences. If admitted to the program, students will complete two additional years (three years, if part time) of undergraduate study in the College of Applied Health Sciences to obtain the bachelor’s degree.

Sixty semester hours, exclusive of basic military science, distributed as follows:

Courses
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsa
5
Additional Analyzing the Natural World courseb
3–5
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy Ic
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy IIc
5
   
Choose one of the following courses:
5
MATH 118—Mathematical Reasoning (5)  
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematics (5)  
   
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychologyd
4
PSCH 242—Introduction to Research in Psychology
3
Exploring World Cultures courseb
3
Understanding the Creative Arts courseb
3
Understanding the Past courseb
3
Understanding U.S. Society courseb
3
IDS 200—Introduction to Management Information Sciences
4
Electives to complete the required total of 60 hours Pre-Health Information Management courses.
6–8
Total Hours—Pre-Health Information Management Requirements
60

a This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
b Students should consult the General Education section of the cata­log for a list approved courses in this category.
c KN 251/252 sequence begins in the fall semester only.
d This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.

The minimum GPA for application to the program in health information management is 2.00/4.00. Students may apply for admission to the program approximately one year before planned enrollment.


Pre-Nursing

The goal of the baccalaureate nursing program is to prepare nurses to function in a variety of settings: hospitals, clinics, rehabilitation centers, convalescent centers, military installations, and public health institutions, such as health departments and home healthcare agencies. Graduates assess the degree of health or illness of individuals, plan, implement, evaluate, and supervise nursing care. Graduates of this program have collegial and independent relationships with other members of the healthcare team.

The preprofessional course work listed below prepares the student to apply to the Bachelor of Science in Nursing program in the College of Nursing.

Courses
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
BIOS 350—General Microbiologya
3
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ib
5
CHEM 130—Survey of Organic and Biochemistryb
5
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy Iac
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy IIc
5
NUEL 250—Human Development Across the Lifespan
3
HN 196—Nutrition
3
Exploring World Cultures coursed
3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursed
3
Understanding the Individual and Society coursede
3
Understanding the Past coursed
3
Understanding U.S. Society coursede
3
One 3-semester-hour, 200-level, upper-division course in the arts and sciencesfg
3
LAS Electives
Varies
Total Hours—Pre-Nursing
57

a BIOS 100 is a prerequisite for this course.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
c KN 251/252 sequence begins in the fall term only.
d Students should consult the General Education section of the cata­log for a list of approved courses in this category.
e For the Understanding the Individual and Society requirement, PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychology is recommended; for the Understanding U.S. Society requirement, SOC 100—Introduction to Sociology is recommended.
f This requirement may be completed after admission to the BSN program.
g Students may choose a course from one of these categories: physical sciences, life sciences, mathematical sciences, fine arts, performing arts, or humanities.

Applications to the BSN program are accepted for fall admission only. Students applying to the BSN program must meet the following minimum requirements:

  1. 2.75/4.00 cumulative transfer grade point average
  2. 2.50/4.00 natural science grade point average
  3. Completion of all pre-nursing course work with a grade of C or higher prior to enrollment. The five natural science courses (human anatomy and physiology I and II, microbiology, general chemistry, organic or biochemistry) must have been completed within seven years of enrollment, and three of the five natural science courses must be completed prior to the application deadline.

In addition, all students will be required to have a background check and drug test upon admission. If the results of either requirement indicate that a student would not be eligible for placement at the college’s practicum agencies, the student’s admission will be rescinded.

Applications are available in September. The final application deadline is January 15. Students should see the program Web site for information regarding current application requirements http://www.uic.edu/nursing/.


Pre-Nutrition

The Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition offers two major concentrations (the Coordinated Program concentration and the Nutrition Science concentration) that lead to the Bachelor of Science degree. The Coordinated Program concentration focuses on the practice of nutrition (i.e., dietetics). Upon successful completion of the program, students are eligible to take the Registration Examination of the Commission on Dietetic Registration to become a Registered Dietitian (RD). The Nutrition Science concentration focuses on intensive study in biological and physical sciences as a basis for understanding the science of nutrition and the relationships between nutrients and human health. This track can be designed to meet the requirements for a didactic program in dietetics (DPD), so that students can apply for a dietetic internship at another institution after completion of the program.

The prerequisite course work listed below prepares the student to apply for either concentration in the Nutrition program offered in the College of Applied Health Sciences.

Please see the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition section of the catalog for more information about each concentration or visit the Web site http://www.ahs.uic.edu/kn/programs/nutrition.php/.

Sixty-four semester hours, exclusive of basic military science, distributed as follows:

Note: Students who do not place into certain courses or do not carefully plan sequential course work should expect to take summer session courses or possibly take longer than two years to complete pre-nutrition course work.

Courses
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research       
3
COMM 100—Fundamentals of Human Communicationa
3
Understanding the Creative Arts courseb
3
Understanding the Past courseb
3
PSCH 100—Introduction to Psychologya
4
SOC 100—Introduction to Sociologyac
3
STAT 130—Introduction to Statistics for the Life Sciences
4
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Id
5
CHEM 114—General Chemistry IId
5
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry I
4
CHEM/BIOS 352—Introductory Biochemistry
3
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsd
5
BIOS 350—General Microbiologye
3
BIOS 351—Microbiology Laboratory
2
MATH 121—Precalculus Mathematicsf
5
HN 110—Foods
3
HN 196—Nutrition
3
Total Hours—Pre-Nutrition Course Requirements
64

a This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.
b Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list approved courses in this category.
c This course is approved for the Understanding U.S. Society General Education category.
d This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
e Students are required to complete or be in-progress taking CHEM 232 if registered for this course.
f Completion of MATH 121 may be satisfied through placement exam or CLEP.


The minimum GPA for application to the two programs in Nutrition is 2.50/4.00.  However, the average GPA for students admitted to the Coordinated Program is higher (currently 3.60). Students should contact the Department of Kinesiology and Nutrition for admission deadlines http://www.ahs.uic.edu/kn/programs/nutrition.php/.


Pre-Pharmacy

The practice of pharmacy requires detailed knowledge of the physical and chemical properties of drugs as well as their particular biologic effects. Pharmacists practice in a variety of settings, including community pharmacies, hospitals, drug industries, and government agencies. Pharmacists may provide patient care, teach at colleges and universities, or may perform pharmaceutical research.

The preprofessional course work listed below prepares the student to apply to the Doctor of Pharmacy program in the College of Pharmacy. The course work generally requires a minimum of two full-time academic years of study. Most students require at least three years to complete prerequisite course work.

Coursesab
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
   
One of the following communication courses:
3
COMM 100—Fundamentals of Human Communication (3)c  
COMM 102—Introduction to Interpersonal Communication (3)c      
   
BIOS 100—Biology of Cells and Organismsd  
5
BIOS 101—Biology of Populations and Communitiesd
5
KN 251—Human Physiological Anatomy Ie
5
KN 252—Human Physiological Anatomy IIe
5
   
One of the following general chemistry sequences:
10
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I (5)d  
CHEM 114—General College Chemistry II (5)d
 
OR  
CHEM 116—Honors General Chemistry I (5)d  
CHEM 118—Honors General Chemistry II (5)d  
   
CHEM 232—Organic Chemistry I
4
CHEM 233—Organic Chemistry Laboratory I
1
CHEM 234—Organic Chemistry II
4
   
One of the following mathematics courses:
5
MATH 165—Calculus for Business (5)  
MATH 180—Calculus I (5)  
   
PHYS 105—Introductory Physics I—Lecturedf
4
PHYS 106—Introductory Physics I—Laboratorydf
1
PHYS 107—Introductory Physics II—Lecturedf
4
PHYS 108—Introductory Physics II – Laboratorydf
1
Social or behavioral sciencesg
3
Economicsg
3
Humanitiesg
3
Total Hours—Pre-Pharmacy
72

a If science courses were taken more than five years prior to admission application, students must have their transcripts evaluated by a College of Pharmacy admissions counselor.
b Students completing a bachelor’s degree at UIC must fulfill all the requirements of an undergraduate degree program, including General Education requirements. Students should consult their college and department sections of the catalog for information on completing their degree programs, including General Education requirements, as well as the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved General Education courses in each category.
c This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.
d This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
e KN 251/252 sequence begins in the fall term only.
f Each of the following pairs of courses will be considered one course in meeting the LAS General Education requirements: PHYS 105/106; PHYS 107/108.
g Students completing an undergraduate degree at UIC should meet with their academic advisor to select courses in the social or behavioral sciences, economics, and humanities that are approved for Exploring World Cultures, Understanding the Creative Arts, Understanding the Past, and Understanding U.S. Society General Education categories.

Students apply for admission to the College of Pharmacy through the centralized application service (PharmCAS) sponsored by the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, http://www.PharmCAS.org. Students should apply for admission approximately one year before enrollment. Pre-pharmacy students must take the Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) prior to the PharmCAS application deadline. PCAT information is available online http://www.pcatweb.info. The PCAT must be from June 2008 or later.

The minimum GPAs (cumulative, science/math, pre-pharmacy) for application to the program in pharmacy are 2.75/4.00. A minimum grade of C must be earned in each pre-pharmacy course. Please note that C minus (C-) grades received at other academic institutions will not meet the minimum grade requirement regardless of the way UIC converts transfer grades into the UIC grade point system.

The College of Pharmacy accepts applications for the fall semester admission only. PharmCAS applications are avail­able starting in June. The College of Pharmacy reviews applications on an ongoing basis beginning shortly after PharmCAS applications are made available in June. A UIC College of Pharmacy supplemental application is also required.

Additional information regarding the admission/application process can be found on the College of Pharmacy Office of Student Affairs Web site http://www.uic.edu/pharmacy/student_affairs.

 

Pre-Urban Public Affairs

Preprofessional Studies
Preprofessional Studies LAS Required Hours
UIC Professional College
Professional Degree Program
Pre-Urban and Public Affairs
60
College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs
BA in Urban and Public Affairs

 

Preprofessional studies in this area require two years of undergraduate study prior to matriculation in the professional program. If admitted to the professional program, students complete the final two years of undergraduate study in the professional college and receive a bachelor’s degree from the professional college.

Pre-Urban and Public Affairs
Students apply for admission through the College of Urban Planning and Public Affairs; admission into the Urban and Public Affairs program is selective and competitive.

  1. Junior standing only (completion of 60 semester hours in Pre-Urban and Public Affairs in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, or from any accredited community college or four-year college or university).
  2. A grade point average of 2.75/4.00
  3. Personal statement of educational goals
  4. Availability of space
  5. One college-level microeconomics course

Special consideration will be given to students who have completed courses in public and urban concerns and having some knowledge of economics and government, including the following courses (or their equivalents) from either a community college or a lower-division program in a four-year institution:

  • UPP 101—Introduction to Urban Studies (3)
  • UPP 202—Planning Great Cities (3)
  • UPP 205—Cinema and the City (3)
  • PA 230—Nonprofit Organizations in U.S. Society (3)
  • POLS 101, 210, 310, 313
  • SOC 101, 105, 241, 265, 276

The 60 semester hours required for admission to the Bachelor of Arts in Urban and Public Affairs should include the following courses:

Courses
Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts
3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research
3
Foreign language (16 hours in a single language or equivalent)      
16
Quantitative Reasoning course
3–5
Introductory microeconomics course
3
Analyzing the Natural World courseab
3–5
Exploring World Cultures coursea
3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursea
3
Understanding the Individual and Society courseac
3
Understanding the Past coursea
3
Understanding U.S. Society courseac
3
Additional General Education course(s) from any categoryac
1–3
Free electivesc
11
Total Hours—Pre-Urban and Public Affairs
60

a Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
b A laboratory course is recommended.
c Recommended electives include a college-level microeconomics course; UPP 101, UPP 202 or 205; PA 230; POLS 210, 310, 313; SOC 105, 241, 265, 276. UPP 101 and UPP 202 are both approved for the Understanding U.S. Society General Education category. Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog to determine if any of the other recommended electives are approved General Education courses.

 

Pre-Law

Preprofessional Studies
Preprofessional Studies Required Hours
Major
Bachelor’s Degree Required for Admission to Professional College
Pre-Law
Varies
Any
Yes


The goal of pre-law studies at UIC is to give students the background necessary to be able to enter an accredited law school after graduation. Law schools require a bachelor’s degree prior to matriculation. Pre-law students must choose an undergraduate major and complete all requirements for the degree.

Because there is no specific course of study required for admission to law school, pre-law students may select a major in any field for the bachelor’s degree. The college, however, recommends a well-rounded program of electives, including course work in analytic areas such as mathematics, composition, and logic. All students with pre-law interest are encouraged to meet with the pre-law advisor as soon as possible to discuss their plans.

The Official Guide to U.S. Law Schools, prepared each year by Law Services, contains up-to-date admission requirements, program descriptions, and facts about tuition and financial aid. This guide may be purchased from the Law School Admissions Services, Box 2000, Newton, PA 18940–0977. A copy is also available in the pre-law advisor’s office. Both provide important information about pre-law academic preparation, careers in law, the LSAT admissions test, strategies for applying to law school, etc.

UIC has a Guaranteed Professional Program Admissions arrangement with John Marshall School of Law for entering freshmen. More information on this program is available in the Admissions section of the catalog.

Accelerated Degree Program in Law

The University of Illinois at Chicago and the Chicago-Kent College of Law offer a six-year program that leads to the bachelor’s degree from UIC and the Juris Doctor degree from Chicago-Kent. Chicago-Kent College of Law, located in Chicago, is the law school of the Illinois Institute of Technology. The second oldest law school in Illinois, Chicago-Kent has a history marked by innovation and excellence. Chicago-Kent is accredited by the American Bar Association and is a member of the Association of American Law Schools and the Order of the Coif.

The Accelerated Degree Program is designed for students with a commitment to academic excellence who pursue a rigorous academic program including the completion of an LAS major and additional undergraduate work chosen in consultation with the pre-law advisor in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Students apply before the beginning of the junior year.

Admission to the program is highly competitive. Among other requirements applicants must have a cumulative GPA of 3.25/4.00 and have completed 60 semester hours. Students interested in this program must consult with the LAS pre-law advisor during the sophomore year.