Skip navigation

Section navigation

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

BS in Electrical Engineering Minor in Electrical Engineering

BS in Computer Engineering
Minor in Computer Engineering

BS in Engineering Physics

 

1020 Science and Engineering Offices (SEO)
(312) 996–3423
ugrad-info@ece.uic.edu
http://www.ece.uic.edu

Administration:
Interim Department Head, Rashid Ansari
Director of Undergraduate Studies, Vahe Caliskan, vahe@uic.edu
ECE Student Services: Alicja Wroblewski, ala@ece.uic.edu

 


BS in Electrical Engineering

The Electrical Engineering curriculum is concerned with analysis and design of modern electronic systems, devices, and signals for a broad range of applications such as wireless or network communication, electrical power and control, and multimedia information technology. The curriculum provides a wide background in the fundamental theory of electrical engineering and in the mathematical and scientific tools necessary for an electrical engineer to meet the current and future challenges of a professional career. The field of electrical engineering is currently evolving at a rapid pace since it has a major role in the accelerated growth of the technological world. This requires the modern electrical engineer not only to have a sound basis in the fundamental principles but also to have the capacity to learn and assimilate novel advances as soon as they materialize. These qualities are anticipated in the curriculum, which includes not only a sound theoretical background but also offers a variety of courses that develop the student’s ability to gain knowledge autonomously and to combine it with contemporary design techniques. Courses are in diverse areas such as signal processing, power electronics, communications, optical and electromagnetic technologies, control systems, integrated circuits, multimedia networks, and image analysis.

The curriculum includes both required and elective courses. The required courses are in engineering, mathematics, and physics; they provide a wide backdrop in science and engineering. The elective courses are more specialized and offer a broad range of electrical engineering applications. Each student is assigned a faculty advisor who assists in the selection of the courses.

In addition to classroom experience, the Electrical Engineering curriculum is planned to provide laboratory experience in electrical and electronic circuits, electromagnetics, communication and signal processing, controls, computers, and digital systems. The curriculum incorporates design projects in the student’s experience starting from the freshman year and culminating in a capstone design project in the senior year. The project requires the students to undertake a significant group design that enriches their knowledge in practical aspects of engineering principles and methodologies. Most of these projects solve realistic problems and the results are presented in an exposition. The curriculum also requires the students to acquire oral and writing skills in expressing their professional ideas and ethical norms.

The educational objectives of the Electrical Engineering undergraduate program are for its graduates to:

Opportunities are available to participate in the activities of the student chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and Eta Kappa Nu, the honor society of electrical and computer engineering. An interest in robotics can be pursued by joining the Engineering Design Team, a College of Engineering student group.

Degree Requirements—Electrical Engineering

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering degree from UIC, students need to complete University, college, and department degree requirements. The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering degree requirements are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Engineering section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies. See the ECE Department website for any revisions of the EE curriculum http://www.ece.uic.edu.

BS in Electrical Engineering Degree Requirements Hours
Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 50
Required in the College of Engineering 55
Technical Electives 17
Additional Mathematics Requirement 3
Electives outside the Major Rubric 3
Total Hours—BS in Electrical Engineering 128

 

Nonengineering and General Education Requirements

Courses Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
Exploring World Cultures coursea 3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursea 3
Understanding the Past coursea 3
Understanding the Individual and Society coursea 3
Understanding U.S. Society coursea 3
MATH 180—Calculus Ib 5
MATH 181—Calculus IIb 5
MATH 210—Calculus IIIb 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations I 3
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics)b 4
PHYS 142 —General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)b 4
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ib 5
Total Hours—Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 50

a Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.

Required in the College of Engineering

Courses Hours
Electrical Engineering Core Courses  
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
   
One of the following courses: 3
CHE 201—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
   
CS 107—Introduction to Computing and Programming 4
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
ECE 225—Circuit Analysis 4
ECE 265—Introduction to Logic Design 4
ECE 267—Computer Organization I 3
ECE 310—Discrete and Continuous Signals and Systems 3
ECE 322—Communication Electromagnetics 3
ECE 340—Electronics I 4
ECE 341—Probability and Random Process for Engineers 3
ECE 346—Solid-State Device Theory 4
ECE 396—Senior Design I 2
ECE 397—Senior Design II 2
ECE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
   
Electrical Engineering Advanced Core Courses  
Three of the following courses, each with a laboratory: 12
ECE 311—Communication Engineering (4)  
ECE 317—Digital Signal Processing I (4)  
ECE 342—Electronics II (4)  
ECE 350—Principles of Automatic Control (4)  
ECE 367—Microprocessor-Based Design (4)  
ECE 424—RF and Microwave-Guided Propagation (4)  
   
Total Hours—Required in the College of Engineering 55

a ENGR 100 is a one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.

Technical Electives

Courses Hours

Seventeen hours chosen from the following list. Those courses not used to meet the advanced electrical engineering core requirement can be used as technical electives. However, no more than a total of two courses below the 400-level may be used to meet the technical elective requirement. Also, no more than one course from outside of the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department may be used to meet the technical elective requirement.

17
PHYS 244—General Physics III (Modern Physics) (3)  
CS 385—Operating Systems Concepts and Design (4)a   
ECE 333—Computer Communication Networks I (4)  
ECE 347—Integrated Circuit Engineering (3)  
ECE 366—Computer Organization II (4)  
ECE 368—CAD-Based Digital Design (4)                            
ECE 401—Quasi-Static Electric and Magnetic Fields (3)  
ECE 407—Pattern Recognition I (3)  
ECE 410—Network Analysis (3)  
ECE 412—Introduction to Filter Synthesis (3)  
ECE 415—Image Analysis and Computer Vision I (3)  
ECE 417—Digital Signal Processing II (4)  
ECE 418—Statistical Digital Signal Processing (3)  
ECE 421— Introduction to Antennas and Wireless Propagation (3)  
ECE 423—Electromagnetic Compatibility (3)  
ECE 427—Modern Linear Optics (3)             
ECE 431—Analog Communication Circuits (4)  
ECE 432—Digital Communications (3)                                
ECE 434—Multimedia Systems (3)                   
ECE 436—Computer Communication Networks II (3)          
ECE 437—Wireless Communications (3)  
ECE 440—Nanoelectronics (3)  
ECE 442—Power Semiconductor Devices and Integrated Circuits (4)  
ECE 445—Analysis and Design of Power Electronic Circuits (4)      
ECE 448—Transistors (3)                                
ECE 449—Microdevices and Micromachining Technology (4)  
ECE 451—Control Engineering (3)                       
ECE 452—Robotics: Algorithms and Control (3)  
ECE 458—Electromechanical Energy Conversion (3)         
ECE 465—Digital Systems Design (3)                             
ECE 466—Computer Architecture (3)             
ECE 467—Introduction to VLSI Design (4)                       
ECE 468—Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI Design (4)      
ECE 469—Computer Systems Design (3)   
MCS 425—Coding and Cryptography (3)       
Total Hours—Technical Electives 17

a CS 385 is an acceptable technical elective for Electrical Engineering majors, provided they satisfy the prerequisites for this course, which are not otherwise required in this program.

Additional Mathematics Requirement

Courses Hours
One of the following courses: 3
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra (3)  
MATH 410—Advanced Calculus I (3)  
MATH 417—Complex Analysis with Applications (3)  
MCS 471—Numerical Analysis (3)  
MATH 481—Applied Partial Differential Equations (3)  
Total Hours—Additional Mathematics Requirement 3


Electives outside the Major Rubric

Courses Hours
Three hours from outside the ECE rubric 3
Total Hours—Electives outside the Major Rubric 3


Students preparing for the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination, which leads to becoming a Licensed Professional Engineer, are advised to use these hours to take CME 201—Statics and one course from the following courses: CME 203—Strength of Materials, CME 260—Properties of Materials, or ME 211—Fluid Mechanics I.

Sample Course Schedule— Electrical Engineering

Freshman Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I 5
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
Total Hours 17
a ENGR 100 is one-semester-hour course, but does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.  
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
CS 107—Introduction to Computing and Programming 4
Total Hours 16
   
Sophomore Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
ECE 265—Introduction to Logic Design 4
General Education Core courses 6
Total Hours 17
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
CHE 201—Introduction to Thermodynamics
OR
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
ECE 267—Computer Organization I 3
General Education Core courses 6
Total Hours 15
   
Junior Year  
First Semester Hours
ECE 225—Circuit Analysis 4
ECE 310—Discrete and Continuous Signals and Systems 3
ECE 346—Solid State Device Theory 4
General Education Core course 3
Additional Mathematics course 3
Total Hours 17
   
Second Semester Hours
ECE 322—Communication Electromagnetics 3
ECE 341—Probability and Random Processes for Engineers 3
ECE 340—Electronics I 4
Advanced EE Core Elective 4
Elective outside the Major Rubric 3
Total Hours 17
   
Senior Year  
First Semester Hours
ECE 396—Senior Design I 2
Advanced EE Core Electives 8
Technical Electives 5
Total Hours 15
   
Second Semester Hours
ECE 397—Senior Design II 2
Technical Electives 13
ECE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
Total Hours 15

Minor in Electrical Engineering

For the minor, 18 semester hours are required, excluding prerequisite courses. Students outside the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering must complete the following:

Prerequisite Courses—Electrical Engineering Minor Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
Total Hours—Prerequisite Courses for Electrical Engineering Minor 28

 

Required Courses—Electrical Engineering Minor Hours
ECE 225—Circuit Analysis 4
ECE 265—Introduction to Logic Design 4
ECE 310—Discrete and Continuous Signals and Systems 3
ECE 322—Communication Electromagnetics 3
ECE 340—Electronics I    4
Total Hours—Required Courses for Electrical Engineering Minor 18


BS in Computer Engineering

Computer Engineering is concerned with the application of electrical engineering and computer science principles to the design of computer systems and digital networks. Through creative utilization of tools and knowledge, a computer engineer designs digital systems that are being employed in virtually all fields of human endeavor. This requires a background in physical sciences, information sciences, electrical engineering, and computer science. Computer engineering requires skills in both the design and development of computer hardware and computer software. Depending on need, the computer engineer may work with electrical engineers, computer scientists, information systems experts, biomedical researchers, and people in almost any other field. The diversity of products that involve the design talents of a computer engineer is unlimited. These range from large to small computers to special purpose computing hardware and software embedded within devices and systems. The applications, for example, are in business to organize, process, and communicate data, communications over mobile and satellite networks, digital sound and picture processing for entertainment, household appliances, automotive systems, manufacturing process control, biomedical instrumentation, machine control, and innumerable other fields. The emphasis in computer engineering is on the design of hardware as well as software tools and systems for the acquisition, processing, storage, and transmission of data and signals by digital means.

All students are required to obtain a strong mathematical foundation, including discrete mathematics and probability and statistics. Each student acquires a common background in the fundamentals of electrical engineering and computer science. This includes course work in computer languages, data structures and algorithms, software design and development, circuit analysis, signal processing, computer architecture, digital networks, microprocessor-based design, digital electronic circuits design, and computer operating systems design. Furthermore, in consultation with an advisor, each student can follow an individualized program by taking courses selected from a departmentally approved list of technical elective courses for computer engineering. In almost all course work, students do design projects while learning to apply basic computer tools. The curriculum also requires the students to acquire oral and writing skills in expressing their professional ideas and ethical norms. As a senior, each student gains further design experience working in a group on a two-semester design project involving practical application of engineering principles.

The educational objectives of the Computer Engineering undergraduate program are for its graduates to:

Students are encouraged to participate in the activities of the student chapters of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM). An interest in robotics can be pursued by joining the Engineering Design Team, a College of Engineering student group. Qualified students will be invited to join Eta Kappa Nu, the honor society for electrical and computer engineers.


Degree Requirements—Computer Engineering

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Computer Engineering degree from UIC, students need to complete University, college, and department degree requirements. The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering degree requirements are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Engineering section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies. See the ECE Department website for any revisions of the CE curriculum http://www.ece.uic.edu.

BS in Computer Engineering

Degree Requirements Hours
Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 50
Required in the College of Engineering 58–59
Technical Electives 14
Additional Mathematics Requirement 3
Electives outside the Major Rubric 3
Total Hours—BS in Computer Engineering 128

 

Nonengineering and General Education Requirements

Courses Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
Exploring World Cultures coursea 3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursea 3
Understanding the Past coursea 3
Understanding the Individual and Society coursea 3
Understanding U.S. Society coursea 3
MATH 180—Calculus Ib 5
MATH 181—Calculus IIb 5
MATH 210—Calculus IIIb 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations I 3
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics)b 4
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)b 4
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ib 5
Total Hours—Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 50

a Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.

Required in the College of Engineering

Courses Hours
Computer Engineering Core Courses  
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
   
One of the following courses: 3
CHE 201—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
   
CS 107—Introduction to Computing and Programming 4
CS 201—Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics I 4
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
ECE 225—Circuit Analysis 4
ECE 265—Introduction to Logic Design 4
ECE 267—Computer Organization I 3
ECE 310—Discrete and Continuous Signals and Systems 3
ECE 340—Electronics I 4
ECE 341—Probability and Random Processes for Engineers 3
ECE 366—Computer Organization II 4
ECE 396—Senior Design I 2
ECE 397—Senior Design II 2
ECE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
   
Computer Engineering Advanced Core Courses  
Students must complete at least two courses from each of the following two groups of courses: 14–15
   
Group A:  
ECE 333—Computer Communication Networks I (4)  
ECE 367—Microprocessor-Based Design (4)  
ECE 368—CAD-Based Digital Design (4)  
CS 385—Operating Systems Concepts and Design (4)  
   
Group B:  
ECE 465—Digital Systems Design (3)  
ECE 466—Computer Architecture (3)  
ECE 467—Introduction to VLSI Design (4)  
CS 401—Algorithms (3)  
Total Hours— Required in the College of Engineering         58–59

a ENGR 100 is a one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.

Technical Electives

Courses  Hours

Fourteen hours chosen from the following list. Those courses not used to meet the advanced computer engineering core requirement can be used as technical electives. However, no more than a total of two courses below the 400-level may be used to meet the technical elective requirement. Also, no more than one course from outside of the ECE Department may be used to meet the technical elective requirement.

14
CS 202—Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics II (3)  
CS 473—Compiler Design (3)                        
CS 485—Networked Operating Systems Programming (4)   
ECE 311—Communication Engineering (4)     
ECE 317—Digital Signal Processing I (4)  
ECE 322—Communication Electromagnetics (3)    
ECE 342—Electronics II (4)                   
ECE 346—Solid-State Device Theory (4)  
ECE 347—Integrated Circuit Engineering (3)   
ECE 350—Principles of Automatic Control (4)  
ECE 401—Quasi-Static Electric and Magnetic Fields (3)  
ECE 407—Pattern Recognition I (3)                   
ECE 410—Network Analysis (3)                      
ECE 412—Introduction to Filter Synthesis (3)  
ECE 415—Image Analysis and Computer Vision I (3)   
ECE 417—Digital Signal Processing II (4)  
ECE 418—Statistical Digital Signal Processing (3)   
ECE 421—Introduction to Antennas and Wireless Propagation (3)  
ECE 423—Electromagnetic Compatibility (3)    
ECE 424—RF and Microwave-Guided Propagation (4)  
ECE 427—Modern Linear Optics (3)                  
ECE 431—Analog Communication Circuits (4)    
ECE 432—Digital Communications (3)                        
ECE 434—Multimedia Systems (3)               
ECE 436—Computer Communication Networks II (3)   
ECE 437—Wireless Communications (3)                          
ECE 442—Power Semiconductor Devices and Integrated Circuits (4)  
ECE 445—Analysis and Design of Power Electronic Circuits (4)      
ECE 448—Transistors (3)                           
ECE 449—Microdevices and Micromachining Technology (4)  
ECE 451—Control Engineering (3)                     
ECE 452—Robotics: Algorithms and Control (3)    
ECE 458—Electromechanical Energy Conversion (3)   
ECE 468—Analog and Mixed-Signal VLSI Design (4)           
ECE 469—Computer Systems Design (3)                          
MCS 425—Coding and Cryptography (3)                        
PHYS 244—General Physics III (Modern Physics) (3)  
Total Hours—Technical Electives 14

 

Additional Mathematics Requirement

Courses Hours
One of the following courses: 3
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra (3)  
MATH 410—Advanced Calculus I (3)  
MATH 417—Complex Analysis with Applications (3)  
MCS 471—Numerical Analysis (3)  
MATH 481—Applied Partial Differential Equations (3)  
Total Hours—Additional Mathematics Requirement 3

 

Electives outside the Major Rubric

Courses Hours
Three hours from outside the ECE Rubric 3
Total Hours—Elective outside the Major Rubric 3


Students preparing for the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination, which leads to becoming a Licensed Professional Engineer, are advised to use these hours to take CME 201—Statics and one course from the following courses: CME 203—Strength of Materials, CME 260—Properties of Materials, or ME 211—Fluid Mechanics.


Sample Course Schedule—Computer Engineering

Freshman Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I 5
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing fo Academic and Public Contexts 3
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
Total Hours 17
a ENGR 100 is one-semester-hour course, but does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.  
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
CS 107—Introduction to Computing and Programming 4
Total Hours 16
   
Sophomore Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
CS 201—Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics I 4
ECE 265—Introduction to Logic Design 4
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 18
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
CHE 201—Introduction to Thermodynamics
OR
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics
3
ECE 267—Computer Organization I 3
General Education Core courses 6
Total Hours 15
   
Junior Year  
First Semester Hours
ECE 225—Circuit Analysis 4
ECE 310—Discrete and Continuous Signals and Systems 3
Advanced CE Core Elective 4
General Education Core course 3
ECE 366—Computer Organization II 4
Total Hours 18
   
Second Semester Hours
Additional Mathematics course 3
ECE 341—Probability and Random Processes for Engineers 3
ECE 340—Electronics I 4
Advanced CE Core Elective 4
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 17
   
Senior Year  
First Semester Hours
ECE 396—Senior Design I 2
Advanced CE Core Elective 3
Elective outside the Major Rubric 3
Technical Electives 6
Total Hours 14
   
Second Semester Hours
ECE 397—Senior Design II 2
Technical Electives 8
Advanced CE Core Elective 3
ECE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
Total Hours 13

Minor in Computer Engineering

For the minor, 19 semester hours are required, excluding prerequisite courses. Students outside the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering must complete the following:

Prerequisite Courses—Computer Engineering Minor Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
CS 107—Introduction to Computing and Programming 4
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
Total Hours—Prerequisite Courses for Computer Engineering Minor 32

 

Required Courses—Computer Engineering Minor Hours
ECE 225—Circuit Analysis 4
ECE 265—Introduction to Logic Design 4
ECE 267—Computer Organization I 3
ECE 366—Computer Organization II 4
CS 201—Data Structures and Discrete Mathematics I 4
Total Hours—Required Courses for Computer Engineering Minor                                19


BS in Engineering Physics

The BS in Engineering Physics is offered by the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering (College of Engineering) in association with the Department of Physics (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences).

The Engineering Physics major bridges the gap between science and technology by combining a strong background in physics and mathematics with exposure to the most fundamental areas of engineering. The program is based on the recognition that most engineering disciplines are rooted in the field of physics, and that new and emerging technologies rarely fall neatly within a single engineering discipline but often straddle different fields. The program highlights, for instance, the subtle and deep relations between materials science and civil engineering, between solid-state physics and chemical engineering, and between electromagnetics and telecommunication engineering.

This training is especially well suited to students who wish to pursue careers in research and development in advanced technology and applied science. In particular, students majoring in this program are well qualified to pursue graduate studies in most areas of engineering and applied physics. They may also pursue a master’s degree in education, thus qualifying to teach physics in high school.

The content of this program strongly emphasizes topics in physics and mathematics; however, this curriculum also gives students great flexibility in the choice of topics for technical electives. Students can customize their curriculum by choosing three technical elective courses from many fields.

Students interested in the Engineering Physics major should contact Professor George Uslenghi in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at uslenghi@uic.edu.

Degree Requirements—Engineering Physics

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics degree from UIC, students need to complete University and college degree requirements. The course requirements for this program are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Engineering section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies. See the ECE Department website for revisions to the Engineering Physics curriculum http://www.ece.uic.edu.

BS in Engineering Physics Degree Requirements Hours
Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 74
Required in the College of Engineering 34
Advanced Electromagnetics Requirement 6–8
Mathematics Elective 3
Technical Electives 9
Electives outside Major Rubric 0–2
Total Hours—BS in Engineering Physics 128

 

Nonengineering and General Education Requirements

Courses Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
Exploring World Cultures coursea 3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursea 3
Understanding the Past coursea 3
Understanding the Individual and Society coursea 3
Understanding U.S. Society coursea 3
MATH 180—Calculus Ib 5
MATH 181—Calculus IIb 5
MATH 210—Calculus IIIb 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations I 3
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics)b 4
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)b 4
PHYS 215—Mathematical Methods for Physicists 4
PHYS 244—General Physics III (Modern Physics) 3
PHYS 245—General Physics IV (Heat, Fluids, and Wave Phenomena) 4
PHYS 411—Quantum Mechanics I 4
PHYS 441—Theoretical Mechanics I 4
PHYS 481—Modern Experimental Physics I 4
PHYS 499—Survey of Physics Problems 1
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ib 5
Total Hours—Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 74

a Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.

Required in the College of Engineering

Courses Hours
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
CME 260—Properties of Materials 3
   
One of the following courses: 3
CHE 201—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
   
One of the following courses: 3
CS 102—Introduction to Programming (3)  
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with
MatLab (3)
 
   
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
ECE 225—Circuit Analysisb 4
ECE 310—Discrete and Continuous Signals and Systems 3
ECE 346—Solid State Device Theory 4
ECE 440—Nanoelectronics 3
BIOE/PHYS 450—Molecular Biophysics of the Cell 4
ME 212—Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics 3
Total Hours—Required in the College of Engineering 34

a ENGR 100 is a one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.

Advanced Electromagnetics Requirement

Courses Hours
One of the following two-course sequences: 6–8
ECE 322—Communication Electromagnetics (3)  
ECE 401—Quasi-Static Electric and Magnetic Fields (3)  
OR  
PHYS 401—Electromagnetism I (4)  
PHYS 402—Electromagnetism II (4)  
Total Hours—Advanced Electromagnetics Requirement 6–8

 

Mathematics Elective

Courses Hours
One of the following courses: 3
MATH 310—Linear Algebra (3)  
MATH 417—Complex Analysis with Applications (3)  
MATH 480—Applied Differential Equations (3)  
MATH 481—Applied Partial Differential Equations (3)  
Total Hours—Mathematics Elective 3

 

Technical Electives

Courses Hours
Nine semester hours from a list of technical electives available from the advisor. These courses should be selected in consultation with the advisor and should be chosen from approved sequences in the following areas: 9
Bioengineering  
Civil and Materials Engineering  
Chemical Engineering Design  
Chemical Engineering, Multiphase Transport Phenomena  
Chemical Engineering, Chemical Processes  
Computer Science  
Electrical and Computer Engineering, Circuits and VLSI  
Electrical and Computer Engineering, Communications and Signal and Processing  
Electrical and Computer Engineering, Solid State, MEMS, and Nanotechnology  
Electromagnetics and Optics  
Mechanical Engineering, Thermal/Fluid Science  
Mechanical Engineering, Mechanical Systems  
Modern Physics  
Total Hours—Technical Electives 9

 

Electives outside Major Rubric

Courses Hours
Electives outside the PHYS and ECE Rubrics 0–2

Total Hours—Electives outside the Major Rubric

0–2

 

Sample Course Schedule—Engineering Physics

Freshman Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I 5
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and  Public Contexts 3
General Education Core course 3
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
Total Hours 16
a ENGR 100 is one-semester-hour course, but does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.  
   
Second Semester Hours
ECE 115—Introduction to Electrical and Computer Engineering 4
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
Total Hours 16
   
Sophomore Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
CME 260—Properties of Materials 3
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 16
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
PHYS 215—Mathematical Methods for Physicists 4
PHYS 244—General Physics III (Modern Physics) 3
PHYS 245—General Physics IV (Heat, Fluids, and Wave Phenomena) 4
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 17
   
Junior Year  
First Semester Hours
ECE 225—Circuit Analysis 4
ECE 346—Solid State Device Theory 4
ME 212—Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics 3
CHE 201 or ME 205—Thermodynamics 3
Mathematics Elective 3
Total Hours 17
   
Second Semester Hours
ECE 310—Discrete and Continuous Signals and Systems 3
BIOE/PHYS 450—Molecular Biophysics of the Cell 4
PHYS 441—Theoretical Mechanics 4
PHYS 481—Modern Experimental Physics I 4
PHYS 499—Survey of Physics Problems 1
Total Hours 16
   
Senior Year  
First Semester Hours
PHYS 411—Quantum Mechanics I 4
Advanced Electromagnetics Requirement I 3–4
Technical Elective 3
General Education Core course 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 16–17
   
Second Semester Hours
ECE 440—Nanoelectronics 3
Advanced Electromagnetics Requirement II 3–4
Technical Elective 3
Technical Elective 3
Elective outside ECE and PHYS 0–2
Total Hours 13–14