Skip navigation

Section navigation

Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering

Accreditation
BS in Mechanical Engineering Minor in Mechanical Engineering

BS in Industrial Engineering
Minor in Industrial Engineering

BS in Engineering Management

 

2039 Engineering Research Facility (ERF)
(312) 996–5317
stacies@uic.edu
http://www.mie.uic.edu
Administration:
Department Head, Farzad Mashayek, mashayek@uic.edu, (312) 996-8421
Department Head Secretary, Evelyn Reyes-Camacho, evreycam@uic.edu, (312) 996-8421
Director of Undergraduate Studies, Houshang Darabi, hdarabi@uic.edu, (312) 996-6593
Student Services: Undergraduate Engineering Office, 123 Science and Engineering Offices (SEO), (312) 996-3463
Undergraduate Coordinator: Stacie Scott, stacies@uic.edu, (312) 996-5317

 


The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering offers both fundamental and advanced courses that prepare students for careers in the engineering profession or for advanced study at the graduate level. The department offers Bachelor of Science degrees in Mechanical Engineering, Industrial Engineering, and Engineering Management. All programs are offered in an economically thriving, industrialized, and world-class city. The campus is located in the heart of Chicago, and has a diverse student body in a leading-edge research environment.

Accreditation

The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering offers two programs accredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. These degrees are the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering and Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering. The Engineering Accreditation Commission of the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology offices are located at 111 Market Place, Suite 1050, Baltimore, MD 21201-4012, (410) 347-7700.

BS in Mechanical Engineering

Mechanical engineering is essential to a wide range of activities that include the design, development, manufacture, management, and control of engineering systems, subsystems, and their components. Typically mechanical engineers are employed in a wide range of industries, such as manufacturing, power, aerospace, automotive, materials, and processing industries. As a result of the recent rapid expansion of technology, mechanical engineers also have become increasingly involved in computer-aided design and visualization; robotics; bioengineering; environmental engineering; solar, wind, and ocean energy sources; and space exploration. The breadth of the field provides the graduate with many possibilities for a satisfying career.

The program has been developed to provide students with a broad base on which to build a successful mechanical engineering career. Courses are offered in the mechanical design and thermal fluid science fields. Topics covered in mechanical design include kinematics, mechanisms, stress analysis, dynamic systems, material properties, CAD/CAM, dynamics, vibrations, mechatronics, microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS), and control theory. Courses offered in the thermal fluid sciences include thermodynamics, heat transfer, and combustion. These courses provide a basis for all types of power applications, including internal combustion engines, nuclear reactors, heating systems, refrigeration systems, and solar power. The program also emphasizes computer applications, professional ethics, communication skills, ability to work in a multidisciplinary team, awareness of broad education, lifelong learning, and contemporary issues.

The objectives of the Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering can be found online http://www.mie.uic.edu/bin/view/MIE/BSMechanicalEngineering#EducationalObjectives.

Degree Requirements— Mechanical Engineering

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Mechanical Engineering degree from UIC, students need to complete University, college, and department degree requirements. The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering degree requirements are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Engineering section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies.

BS in Mechanical Engineering Degree Requirements Hours
Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 53
Required in the College of Engineering 66
Technical Electives 6
Electives outside the Major Rubric 3
Total Hours—BS in Mechanical Engineering 128

 

Nonengineering and General Education Requirements

Courses Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research  3
Exploring World Cultures coursea 3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursea 3
Understanding the Past coursea 3
Understanding the Individual and Society coursea 3
Understanding U.S. Society coursea 3
MATH 180—Calculus Ib 5
MATH 181—Calculus IIb 5
MATH 210—Calculus IIIb 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ib 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics)b 4
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)b 4
   
Choose one of the following courses: 3
PHYS 244—General Physics III (Modern Physics) (3)  
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra (3)  
Total Hours—Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 53

a Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.


Required in the College of Engineering

Courses Hours
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
CME 201—Statics 3
CME 203—Strength of Materials 3
CME/ME 261—Materials for Manufacturing 2
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab 3
ECE 210—Electrical Circuit Analysis 3
IE 201—Financial Engineering 3
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics 3
ME 210—Engineering Dynamics 3
ME 211—Fluid Mechanics I 4
ME 250—Engineering Graphics and Design 3
ME 308—Mechanical Vibrations 3
ME 312—Dynamic Systems and Control 3
ME 320—Mechanisms and Dynamics of Machinery 4
ME 321—Heat Transfer 4
ME 325—Intermediate Thermodynamics 3
ME 341—Experimental Methods in ME 3
ME 370—Mechanical Engineering Design 3
ME 380—Manufacturing Process Principles 3
ME 396—Senior Design Ib 2
ME 397—Senior Design II 2
ME 428—Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering 3
ME 447—Introduction to Computer-Aided Design 3
ME 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
Total Hours—Required in the College of Engineering 66

a ENGR 100 is a one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.
b ME 445 may be used as a substitute for ME 396; ME 444 is a prerequisite for ME 445.

Technical Electives

Courses Hours
Six hours from the list below: 6
ME 392—Undergraduate Research (3 or 6)  
IE 342—Probability and Statistics for Engineers (3)  
ECE 458—Electromechanical Energy Conversion (3)  
Any 400-level ME course not required above  
Total Hours—Technical Electives 6

 

Electives outside the Major Rubric

Courses Hours
Electives outside the ME Rubric 3
Total Hours—Electives outside the Major Rubric 3

 

Sample Course Schedule— Mechanical Engineering

Freshman Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I 5
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
General Education Core course 3
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
Total Hours 16
a ENGR 100 is one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.  
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
ME 250—Engineering Graphics and Design 3
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab 3
Total Hours 18
   
Sophomore Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
IE 201—Financial Engineering 3
CME 201—Statics 3
CME 261—Materials for Manufacturing 2
Total Hours 15
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
PHYS 244—General Physics III (Modern Physics)
OR MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra
3
CME 203—Strength of Materials 3
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics 3
Elective outside Major Rubric 3
Total Hours 15
   
Junior Year  
First Semester Hours
ECE 210—Electrical Circuit Analysis 3
ME 210—Engineering Dynamics 3
ME 211—Fluid Mechanics I 4
ME 325—Intermediate Thermodynamics 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 16
   
Second Semester Hours
ME 308—Mechanical Vibrations 3
ME 312—Dynamic Systems and Control 3
ME 320—Mechanisms and Dynamics of Machinery 4
ME 321—Heat Transfer 4
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 17
   
Senior Year  
First Semester Hours
ME 380—Manufacturing Process Principles 3
ME 428—Numerical Methods in Mechanical Engineering 3
ME 447—Introduction to Computer-Aided Design 3
ME 370—Mechanical Engineering Design 3
ME 396—Senior Design I 2
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 17
   
Second Semester Hours
ME 341—Experimental Methods in Mechanical Engineering 3
ME 397—Senior Design II 2
ME 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
General Education Core course 3
Senior Technical Electives 6
Total Hours 14

Minor in Mechanical Engineering

For the minor, 16–18 semester hours are required, excluding prerequisite courses. Students not majoring in Mechanical Engineering who wish to minor in Mechanical Engineering must complete the following:

Prerequisite Courses— Mechanical Engineering Minor Hours
CME 201—Statics 3
   
One of the following courses: 3
CS 101—Introduction to Computing (3)  
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab (3)  
   
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
   
One of the following courses: 3
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
CHE 201—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
   
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
Total Hours—Prerequisite Courses for Mechanical Engineering Minor 29

 

Required Courses—Mechanical Engineering Minor Hours
CME 203—Strength of Materials 3
ME 210—Engineering Dynamics 3
ME 211—Fluid Mechanics I 4
   
Two courses from the following: 6–8
ME 308—Mechanical Vibrations (3)  
ME 312—Dynamic Systems and Control (3)  
ME 320—Mechanisms and Dynamics of Machinery (4)  
ME 321—Heat Transfer (4)  
ME 325—Intermediate Thermodynamics (3)  
ME 341—Experimental Methods in Mechanical Engineering (3)  
ME 370—Mechanical Engineering Design (3)  
ME 380—Manufacturing Process Principles (3)  
ME 447—Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (3)  
   
Total Hours—Required Courses for Mechanical Engineering Minor 16–18

BS in Industrial Engineering

Industrial engineering is concerned with the design, improvement, and installation of integrated systems of people, material, and equipment. The Industrial Engineering program gives knowledge of principles and methods in engineering design, physical sciences, and social sciences. This knowledge then is used to specify, predict, and evaluate systems. By collecting, analyzing, and arranging such knowledge, industrial engineers enable management to utilize resources effectively and efficiently.

In order to design and operate complex systems, the industrial engineer must acquire comprehensive knowledge in the following areas: manufacturing engineering; production engineering; systems engineering; and human factors, maintenance, and safety engineering.

Manufacturing engineering is involved with planning and selecting manufacturing methods, with designing and developing manufacturing equipment, and with increasing the efficiency and productivity of current manufacturing technologies as well as creating new ones. Manufacturing engineers use materials science, metal cutting and forming theories, stochastic-dynamic models, principles of numerical and adaptive control, engineering statistics, and other physical sciences to solve manufacturing problems. A new area in manufacturing is virtual manufacturing, which combines virtual reality techniques, factory design, equipment design, training, and contamination control in industrial applications.

Production engineering deals with the analysis, design, installation, and maintenance of operational and management systems involved in the production and distribution of goods and services. Such topics as quality control, production scheduling, production planning, inventory control, and maintenance policy are included in this area.

Systems engineering involves the theory and practice of modeling a general system design. The systems engineer develops mathematical, statistical, and computer models of complex systems to predict how a design or policy change will affect the real world. Human factors, maintenance, and safety engineering deal with the problems caused by the interaction of complex man-machine systems. The engineers in this area apply knowledge about sensory, perceptual, and mental characteristics in the engineering design of equipment and facilities to ensure worker comfort and safety.

Because the training of industrial engineers is so broad, they are in demand not only in all types of industry but also in service organizations, such as hospitals, banks, insurance companies, and research laboratories.

The program also emphasizes computer applications, professional ethics, communication skills, ability to work in a multidisciplinary team and awareness of broad education, lifelong learning, and contemporary issues.

The objectives of the Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering can be found online
http://www.mie.uic.edu/bin/view/MIE/BSIndustrialEngineering#EducationalObjectives.

Degree Requirements—Industrial Engineering

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering degree from UIC, students need to complete University, college, and department degree requirements. The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering degree requirements are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Engineering section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies.

BS in Industrial Engineering Degree Requirements Hours
Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 56
Required in the College of Engineering 63
Technical Elective 6
Electives outside the Major Rubric 3
Total Hours—BS in Industrial Engineering 128

 

Nonengineering and General Education Requirements

Courses Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
Exploring World Cultures coursea 3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursea 3
Understanding the Past coursea 3
Understanding the Individual and Society coursea 3
Understanding U.S. Society coursea 3
MATH 180—Calculus Ib 5
MATH 181—Calculus IIb 5
MATH 210—Calculus IIIb 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra 3
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ib 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics)b 4
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)b 4
MGMT 340—Introduction to Organizations 3
Total Hours—Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 56

a Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.


Required in the College of Engineering

Courses Hours
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
CME 201—Statics 3
CME 203—Strength of Materials 3
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab 3
ECE 210—Electrical Circuit Analysis 3
IE 201—Financial Engineering 3
IE 342—Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3
IE 345—Regression Applications and Forecasting in Engineering 3
IE 365—Work Productivity Analysis 4
IE 380—Manufacturing Process Principles 3
IE 396—Senior Design I 2
IE 397—Senior Design II 2
IE 442—Design and Analysis of Experiments in Engineering 4
IE 446—Quality Control and Reliability 3
IE 461—Safety Engineering 3
IE 463—Plant Layout and Materials Handling 3
IE 466—Production Planning and Inventory Control 3
IE 467—Discrete Event Computer Simulation Application 3
IE 471—Operations Research I 3
IE 472—Operations Research II 3
IE 473—Stochastic Processes and Queuing Models 3
ME 250—Engineering Graphics and Design 3
IE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
Total Hours—Required in the College of Engineering 63

a ENGR 100 is a one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.

Technical Elective

Courses Hours
Two courses from the list below: 6
IE 392—Undergraduate Research (3)  
ME 205—Introduction to Thermodynamics (3)  
ME 210—Engineering Dynamics (3)  
ME 447—Introduction to Computer-Aided Design (3)  
Any IE course at the 400-level not required above (3)  
Total Hours—Technical Elective 6

Electives outside the Major Rubric

Courses Hours
Electives outside the IE Rubric 3
Total Hours—Electives outside the Major Rubric 3

 

Sample Course Schedule—Industrial Engineering

Freshman Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I 5
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
General Education Core course 3
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
Total Hours 16
a ENGR 100 is one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.  
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
ME 250—Engineering Graphics and Design 3
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab 3
Total Hours 18
   
Sophomore Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
IE 201—Financial Engineering 3
CME 201—Statics 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 16
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra 3
CME 203—Strength of Materials 3
IE 342—Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 15
   
Junior Year  
First Semester Hours
IE 471—Operations Research I 3
IE 442—Design and Analysis of Experiments in Engineering 3
IE 365—Work Productivity Analysis 4
ECE 210—Electrical Circuit Analysis 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 16
   
Second Semester Hours
IE 345—Regression Applications and Forecasting in Engineering 3
IE 472—Operations Research II 3
IE 446—Quality Control and Reliability 3
MGMT 340—Introduction to Organizations 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 15
   
Senior Year  
First Semester Hours
IE 461—Safety Engineering 3
IE 380—Manufacturing Process Principles 3
IE 396—Senior Design I 2
IE 467—Discrete Event Computer Simulation Application 3
IE 473—Stochastic Processes and Queuing Models 3
Technical Elective 3
Total Hours 17
   
Second Semester Hours
IE 397—Senior Design II 2
IE 463—Plant Layout and Materials Handling 3
IE 466—Production Planning and Inventory Control 3
Technical Elective 3
IE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
Elective outside Major Rubric 3
Total Hours 14

Minor in Industrial Engineering

For the minor, 12 semester hours are required, excluding prerequisite courses. Students not majoring in Industrial Engineering who wish to minor in Industrial Engineering must complete the following:

Prerequisite Courses—Industrial Engineering Minor Hours
One of the following courses: 3
CS 101—Introduction to Computing (3)  
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab (3)  
   
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
MATH 220—Introduction to Differential Equations 3
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra 3
IE 201—Financial Engineering 3
Total Hours—Prerequisite Courses for Industrial Engineering Minor 25
 
Required Courses—Minor in Industrial Engineering Hours
IE 342—Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3
IE 446—Quality Control and Reliability 3
IE 463—Plant Layout and Materials Handling 3
IE 471—Operations Research I 3
Total Hours—Required Courses for Minor in Industrial Engineering 12

BS in Engineering Management

The College of Engineering and the College of Business Administration offer a joint program in engineering management that allows students latitude to study in both the business administration and engineering disciplines. This program prepares students to begin careers that may lead to administrative, staff, or management positions in small technological engineering or manufacturing operations or positions as production supervisors, administration staff, or managers of departments in large technological organizations. The program also prepares students for careers in large nontechnological organizations such as banks, which may require a combination of engineering and management experiences.

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Management is awarded by the College of Engineering. Entrance requirements are the same as for the College of Engineering.

To complete the required 128 semester hours of University credit, students take required courses in engineering as well as courses in business administration, including accounting, finance, marketing, economics, and management. Additionally, there are required courses in English composition, mathematics, chemistry, and physics. Engineering courses are chosen from courses acceptable for other students in the College of Engineering. No more than 32 hours may be taken in courses offered by the College of Business Administration.

Degree Requirements—Engineering Management

To earn a Bachelor of Science in Engineering Management degree from UIC, students need to complete University, college, and department degree requirements. The Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering degree requirements are outlined below. Students should consult the College of Engineering section for additional degree requirements and college academic policies.

BS in Engineering Management Degree Requirements Hours
Nonengineering and General Education Requirements 74
Required in the College of Engineering 52
Elective outside the Major Rubric 2
Total Hours—BS in Engineering Management 128

 

Nonengineering and General Education Requirements


Courses Hours
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
Understanding the Past coursea 3
Understanding the Creative Arts coursea 3
Exploring World Cultures coursea 3
MATH 180—Calculus Ib 5
MATH 181—Calculus IIb 5
MATH 210—Calculus IIIb 3
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra 3
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry Ib 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics)b 4
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism)b 4
ACTG 210—Introduction to Financial Accounting 3
ACTG 211—Introduction to Managerial Accounting 3
ECON 120—Principles of Microeconomicscd 4
ECON 121—Principles of Macroeconomicscd 4
FIN 300—Introduction to Managerial Finance 3
MGMT 340—Introduction to Organizations 3
MGMT 350—Business and Its External Environment 3
MGMT 495—Competitive Strategy 4
MKTG 360—Introduction to Marketing 3
Total Hours—Nonengineering and General Requirements 74

a Students should consult the General Education section of the catalog for a list of approved courses in this category.
b This course is approved for the Analyzing the Natural World General Education category.
c This course is approved for the Understanding the Individual and Society General Education category.
d This course is approved for the Understanding U.S. Society General Education category.

Required in the College of Engineering

Courses Hours
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
CME 201—Statics 3
CME 203—Strength of Materials 3
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab 3
IE 201—Financial Engineering          3
IE 441—Ergonomics and Human Factors 3
IE 342—Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3
IE 345—Regression Applications and Forecasting in Engineering 3
IE 365— Work Productivity Analysis 4
IE 380—Manufacturing Process Principles 3
IE 446—Quality Control and Reliability 3
IE 461—Safety Engineering 3
IE 463—Plant Layout and Materials Handling 3
IE 464— Virtual Automation 3
IE 466—Production Planning and Inventory Control 3
IE 467— Discrete Event Computer Simulation Application 3
IE 471—Operations Research I 3
IE 472—Operations Research II 3
IE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
Total Hours—Required in the College of Engineering 52

aENGR 100 is a one-semester-hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.

Elective outside the Major Rubric

Courses Hours
Elective outside the IE Rubric and College of Business Administration 2
Total Hours—Elective outside the Major Rubric 2

 

Sample Course Schedule— Engineering Management

Freshman Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 180—Calculus I 5
CHEM 112—General College Chemistry I 5
ENGL 160—Academic Writing I: Writing for Academic and Public Contexts 3
ECON 120—Principles of Microeconomics 4
ENGR 100—Orientationa 0a
Total Hours 17
a ENGR 100 is one-semester- hour course, but the hour does not count toward the total hours required for graduation.  
   
Second Semester Hours
MATH 181—Calculus II 5
PHYS 141—General Physics I (Mechanics) 4
ENGL 161—Academic Writing II: Writing for Inquiry and Research 3
ECON 121—Principles of Macroeconomics 4
Total Hours 16
   
Sophomore Year  
First Semester Hours
MATH 210—Calculus III 3
PHYS 142—General Physics II (Electricity and Magnetism) 4
IE 201—Financial Engineering 3
ACTG 210—Introduction to Financial Accounting 3
CS 109—C/C++ Programming for Engineers with MatLab 3
Total Hours 16
   
Second Semester Hours
ACTG 211—Introduction to Managerial Accounting 3
CME 201—Statics 3
MATH 310—Applied Linear Algebra 3
MGMT 340—Introduction to Organizations 3
MKTG 360—Introduction to Marketing 3
Total Hours 15
   
Junior Year  
First Semester Hours
IE 441—Ergonomics and Human Factors 3
IE 342—Probability and Statistics for Engineers 3
IE 365— Work Productivity Analysis 4
CME 203—Strength of Materials 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 16
   
Second Semester Hours
IE 345—Regression Applications and Forecasting in Engineering 3
IE 380—Manufacturing Process Principles 3
IE 446—Quality Control and Reliability 3
FIN 300—Introduction to Managerial Finance 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 15
   
Senior Year  
First Semester Hours
IE 461—Safety Engineering 3
IE 464—Virtual Automation 3
IE 467—Discrete Event Computer Simulation Application 3
IE 471—Operations Research I 3
MGMT 350—Business and Its External Environment 3
General Education Core course 3
Total Hours 18
   
Second Semester Hours
MGMT 495—Competitive Strategy 4
IE 463—Plant Layout and Materials Handling 3
IE 466—Production Planning and Inventory Control 3
IE 472—Operations Research II 3
IE 499—Professional Development Seminar 0
Elective outside Major Rubric 2
Total Hours 15