Bioengineering - BIOE


The information below lists courses approved in this subject area effective Fall 2014. Not all courses will necessarily be offered these terms. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for a listing of courses offered for a specific term.

500-level courses require graduate standing.

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101 Introduction to Bioengineering
3 hours. Principles, practice, and the role of bioengineers in science, engineering, and commercialization of medical products. Professional ethics, career paths, introduction to graphical design tools and instrumentation. Previously listed as BIOE 200.

102 Bioengineering Freshman Seminar
1 hours. Exposure to bioengineering research through attendance of graduate student seminars followed by faculty-mediated discussion. Writing seminar summaries, graduate student shadowing, articulating long-term goals, and planning an academic trajectory. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Restricted to first year bioengineering students (freshmen or transfer students).

205 Bioengineering Thermodynamics
3 hours. Introduction to equilibrium and non-equilibrium thermodynamics, with emphasis on non-equilibrium (living) systems. Applications include thermodynamics of living cells and the lung, molecular energy exchange, and energy exchange in exercise. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 141.

240 Modeling Physiological Data and Systems
3 hours. A lecture/discussion course introducing the use of mathematical models and statistics to describe, interpret and analyze physiological data and systems. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100; and MATH 180; and CS 109. Open only to freshmen and sophomores.

250 Clinical Problems in Bioengineering
3 hours. Examination of three to four real problems in bioengineering. Student teams work with a faculty facilitator toward each solution. Problem identification, strategic planning, brainstorming, information gathering and reporting are formalized. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 101. Open only to freshmen and sophomores.

310 Biological Systems Analysis
3 hours. System dynamics and frequency-domain analysis in bioengineering systems. Topics include population models, predator-prey models, metabolic networks, biological oscillation, dynamics of infectious diseases. No credit given if the student has credit in ECE 310 or ME 312. Prerequisite(s): MATH 220; and MATH 310.

325 Biotransport
3 hours. Transport phenomena in biomedical engineering and living systems, specifically processes vital to the design of medical devices for artificial clinical intervention. Topics include circulatory system dynamics and modeling of physiological systems. Prerequisite(s): MATH 220 and BIOS 100.

339 Biostatistics I
3 hours. Statistical treatment of data and model estimation treated in a framework of biological experiments, and attributes of data generated from such experiments. Experimental design is included. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): MATH 210; and CS 107 or CS 108 or CS 109. Recommended Background: Prior knowledge of Excel.

396 Senior Design I
3 hours. Design considerations for biomedical devices emphasizing traditional engineering design concepts. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in BIOE 339.

397 Senior Design II
3 hours. Application of principles of engineering and engineering design methodology to the solution of a large scale biomedical engineering design problem. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 396.

398 Undergraduate Research
1 TO 5 hours. Research under the close supervision of a faculty member. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

399 Professional Development for Bioengineers
0 hours. Career options, career planning, and job search skills relevant to bioengineers. Formal and informal networking, on-line resources, resume and portfolio preparation, interview skills. Special issues relevant to international students. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Open only to juniors; or consent of the instructor.

402 Medical Technology Assessment
2 OR 3 hours. Bioentrepreneur course. Assessment of medical technology in the context of commercialization. Objectives, competition, market share, funding, pricing, manufacturing, growth, and intellectual property; many issues unique to biomedical products. 2 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above and consent of the instructor.

403 Quality Assurance for Medical Products
2 OR 3 hours. Requirements for current good manufacturing practices and quality assurance in the design and manufacture of medical devices. 2 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 250; and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

405 Atomic and Molecular Nanotechnology
3 OR 4 hours. Nanoscale structures and phenomena. Simulation methods for nano systems, and molecular assemblies. Molecular building blocks, scanning probe and atomic force microscopy, quantum mechanical phenomena. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or above. Recommended background: Engineering or physical science major.

406 Regulation and Manufacturing Practices in Medical Technology
2 OR 3 hours. Bioentrepreneur course. Product requirement definition, FDA, quality system regulation, community Europe, medical device directive, role of management, United States pharmacopoeia, toxicity testing, hazard analysis, risk assessment, import/export. 2 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above and consent of the instructor.

407 Pattern Recognition I
3 OR 4 hours. The design of automated systems for detection, recognition, classification and diagnosis. Parametric and nonparametric decision-making techniques. Applications in computerized medical and industrial image and waveform analysis. Same as ECE 407. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): MATH 220.

408 Medical Product Development
2 OR 3 hours. Bioentrepreneur course. Major stages of medical product development (investigative, feasibility, development, commercialization, maturation and growth), regulatory issues, product performance, failure mode and effect analysis, hazard analysis. 2 undergraduate hours. 3 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Junior standing or above and consent of the instructor.

410 FDA and ISO Requirements for the Development and Manufacturing of Medical Devices
3 OR 4 hours. FDA Performance Standard for General Medical Devices for manufacturing and development engineers. Product requirement definition, design control, hazard analysis, failure mode and effect analysis, regulatory submission, product tests, ISO 9001. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100 and BIOE 250. Recommended background: Junior standing or above.

415 Biomechanics
3 OR 4 hours. Use of rigid and deformable body statics and rigid body dynamics to analyze various aspects of the human musculoskeletal system. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CME 201 and ME 210; and BIOS 430 or BIOS 443 or BIOS 484 or BIOS 485.

420 Introduction to Field and Waves in Biological Tissues
3 OR 4 hours. Principles of electromagnetic and ultrasonic interaction with biological systems; characterization of biological materials; diagnostic and therapeutic uses; and techniques of dosimetry and measurement. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): ECE 310.

421 Biomedical Imaging
3 OR 4 hours. Introduction to engineering and scientific principles associated with X-ray, magnetic resonance, ultrasound, computed tomographic and nuclear imaging. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): MATH 210 and PHYS 142.

422 Magnetic Resonance Imaging
3 OR 4 hours. Fundamental priciples of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) from a signal processing perspective. Focus on image acquisition, formation, and analysis. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 310 or ECE 310; and junior standing or above; or consent of the instructor.

430 Bioinstrumentation and Measurements I
3 OR 4 hours. Theory and application of instrumentation used for physiological and medical measurements. Characteristics of physiological variables, signal conditioning devices and transducers. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100; and ECE 115 or ECE 210 or ECE 225; and BIOE 310 or ECE 310 or ME 312.

431 Bioinstrumentation and Measurement Laboratory
2 hours. Practical experience in the use of biomedical instrumentation for physiological measurements. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in BIOE 430.

432 Bioinstrumentation and Measurements II
3 OR 4 hours. Principles of bioinstrumentation for the assessment of physiological function and therapeutic intervention. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 430.

433 Bioinstrumentation and Measurements II Laboratory
1 hours. Laboratory experiments using instruments to assess physiological function. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in BIOE 432.

439 Biostatistics II
4 hours. Statistical treatment of data, model estimation, and inference are treated in a framework of biological experiments and attributes of data generated from such experiments. Credit is not given for BIOE 439 if the student has credit for BSTT 400. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): MATH 210 and CS 108; and consent of the instructor. Recommended background: Knowledge of MATLab.

440 Biological Signal Analysis
3 OR 4 hours. Analysis of signals of biological origin. Transient signals. Stability analysis. Control. Probabilities, stochastic processes. Medical applications. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): MATH 210 and senior or graduate standing.

450 Molecular Biophysics of the Cell
4 hours. Introduction to force, time energies at nanometer scales; Boltzmann distribution; hydrodynamic drag; Brownian motions; DNA, RNA protein structure and function; sedimentation; chemical kinetics; general aspects of flexible polymers. Same as PHYS 450. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 245 or the equivalent; or approval of the department.

452 Biocontrol
3 OR 4 hours. Considers the unique characteristics of physiological systems using the framework of linear systems and control theory. Static and dynamic operating characteristics, stability, and the relationship of pathology to control function. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): ECE 310; and either BIOS 442 or BIOS 443.

455 Introduction to Cell and Tissue Engineering
3 OR 4 hours. Foundation of cell and tissue engineering covering cell technology, construct technology, and cell-substrate interactions. Emphasis in emerging trends and technologies in tissue engineering. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CME 260; and credit or concurrent registration in BIOE 430 or BIOS 443 or BIOS 484 or BIOS 485.

456 Cell and Tissue Engineering Laboratory
2 hours. Includes polymer scaffold fabrication, microstamping biomolecules, cellular adhesion and proliferation assays, and immo/fluorescent tagging. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in BIOE 455; or consent of the instructor.

460 Materials in Bioengineering
3 OR 4 hours. Analysis and design considerations of problems associated with prostheses and other implanted biomedical devices. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): CME 260; and BIOS 220 or BIOS 222 or BIOS 240 BIOS 286 or BIOS 352.

465 Metabolic Engineering
3 OR 4 hours. Quantitative descriptions of biochemical networks; modeling, control, and design of metabolic pathways to achieve industrial and medical goals. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 310 or ECE 310 or ME 312; or consent of the instructor.

470 Bio-Optics
3 OR 4 hours. Physical principles and instrumentation relevant to the use of light in biomedical research. Several current and developing clinical applications are explored. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 142.

472 Models of the Nervous System
3 OR 4 hours. Mathematical models of neural excitation and nerve conduction, stochastic models and simululation of neuronal activity, models of neuron pools and information processing, models of specific neural networks. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 310 or ECE 310 or ME 312; and credit or concurrent registration in BIOS 484 or BIOS 485.

475 Neural Engineering I: Introduction to Hybrid Neural Systems
3 OR 4 hours. Modeling and design of functional neural interfaces for in vivo and in vitro applications, electrodes and molecular coatings, neural prostheses and biopotential control of robotics. Same as BIOS 475. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 472; or consent of the instructor.

476 Neural Engineering I Laboratory
2 hours. Hands-on experience with computational and experimental models of engineered neural systems, with emphasis on neuroprostheses and biosensors. Animals used in instruction. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in BIOE 475.

480 Introduction to Bioinformatics
3 OR 4 hours. Computational analysis of genomic sequences and other high throughput data. Sequence alignment, dynamic programming, database search, protein motifs, cDNA expression array, and structural bioinformatics. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100 and CS 201; or consent of the instructor.

481 Bioinformatics Laboratory
2 hours. How to use bioinformatics tools, including sequence alignment methods such as Blast, Fasta, and Pfam, as well as structural bioinformatics tools, such as Rasmol and CastP. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in BIOE 480; and senior standing or above; and consent of the instructor.

482 Introduction to Optimization Methods in Bioinformatics
3 OR 4 hours. The objectives are to provide the students with a basis for understanding principles of the optimization methods and an insight on how these methods are used in bioinformatics. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 100 and CS 201.

483 Molecular Modeling in Bioinformatics
3 OR 4 hours. Basic structural and dynamics tools in protein structure prediction, structure comparison, function prediction, Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulations. 3 undergraduate hours. 4 graduate hours. Prerequisite(s): Grade of B or better in BIOE 480.

494 Special Topics in Bioengineering
1 TO 4 hours. Special topics to be arranged. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

500 Interfacial Biosystems Engineering
4 hours. Advanced and detailed exposition of the fundamentals of biological systems using quantitative approaches. Areas of concentration include bioinformatics, cell and tissue engineering, and neuroengineering. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 442.

504 Emerging Medical Technologies
2 hours. Investigates new and emerging medical technologies following the technical due diligence process, a methodical evaluation of strengths, weaknesses, opportunities and threats of the identified technology. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 401 or BIOE 402 or BIOE 403 or the equivalent.

505 NanoBioTechnology
4 hours. Nanotechnology theory and applications in biology and medicine. Molecular simulations, combinatorial chemistry. Nanoscale structures, molecular building blocks, integrated nano-bio complexes. Positional and self-assembly, self-replication. Recommended background: Engineering or physical sciences.

510 Drug Transport in the Central Nervous System
4 hours. Introduction to convective and diffusive transport of macromolecules with special attention to drug transport and biochemical reactions in the central nervous system. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing; and consent of the instructor.

514 Biotransport
4 hours. Diffusion and flow in living systems. Blood rheology and flow. Microcirculation, oxygen transport, diffusive transport across membranes. Membrane structure; water, and ion flows, active transport. Same as CHE 514. Prerequisite(s): CHE 410 or consent of the instructor.

515 Mechanics of the Human Spine
4 hours. Biomechanics as applied to the human spine. Spinal loading. Experimentation methods and modelling of intact ligamentous spine. Nature and treatment of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis. Thoracolumbar injuries. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 415 or the equivalent.

518 Controlled Drug Delivery
3 hours. Controlled drug delivery systems utilizing polymers, synthesis of different types of devices, and the delivery expected from these devices, and mathematical modeling of delivery systems. Same as BPS 518. Prerequisite(s): MATH 220 or approval of the department.

521 Imaging Systems for Biological Tissues
4 hours. Examination of major imaging systems using ionizing and nonionizing energy for characterization of biological tissues and physiological lesions. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 420.

522 Principles of Polymeric Science and Engineering
3 hours. Intermediate polymer science, thermodynamics of polymer solutions, phase separations, MW determination, crystallization, elasticity, kinetics and processing. Same as BPS 522. Prerequisite(s): MATH 220 or consent of the instructor.

525 Physiological and Cellular Effects of Biomechanical Forces
4 hours. Discuss how biomechanical forces are generated, the impact the forces have on cells and tissues, plus methods for studying them. Mechanisms by which cells may sense forces and transduce this information to the nucleus are also covered. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

548 Micro and Nanotechnology for Biomedical Applications
4 hours. This course covers selected topics in micro- and nano-technology underlying biomedical applications; topics include: microfabrication and nanofabrication; microfluidic processes; neuroMEMS; nanoscale structures as functional bio-interfaces. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 244.

550 Principles of Cell and Tissue Engineering
4 hours. Introduction to tissue engineering. Presents principles of biomedical, biochemical, and biomaterials science applied to tissue engineered organ replacements, implantable medical devices, and drug delivery systems. Prerequisite(s): BIOS 442 or BIOS 443; and CEMM 260. Recommended background: A course in cell biology.

552 Advanced Biocontrol
4 hours. Modeling and analysis of physiological systems including such topics as adaptive control, statistical analysis error signal analysis and the characteriszation of individual neural control elements. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 452.

560 Processing and Properties of Structural Biomaterials
4 hours. Considers the inter-relationships between atomic bonding, atomic/molecular structure and material processing to provide a fundamental understanding of the properties and performance of advanced biomaterials. Prerequisite(s): CEMM 260. Recommended background: Credit in BIOE 460.

575 Neural Engineering II - Neural Coding
4 hours. Analytical techniques and models used to assess and predict neural activity. Emphasis on information coding in sensory systems. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor. Recommended background: Working knowledge of Matlab.

576 Sensory Prostheses Engineering
4 hours. Critical review of existing and emerging prosthetic devices for sensory systems damaged by trauma or disease. Technology and information flow in hybrid systems are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 475 and BIOS 442; or consent of the instructor.

579 Neural and Neuromuscular Prostheses
4 hours. Neuromuscular electrical stimulation for ambulation by paraplegics, of upper limb in tetraplegics, of vocal cord and breathing functions, stimulation of bladder, cochlea, retina, and visual cortex. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

580 Principles of Bioinformatics
4 hours. Bioinformatics analysis of sequence, phylogeny, and molecular structure. Focus on probabilistic models and algorithms, as well as structural analysis. Extensive computer use required. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 480; and graduate or professional standing; or consent of the instructor. Recommended background: Exposure to biochemistry, molecular biology, or evolution.

582 Computational Functional Genomics
4 hours. Modern statistical and computational methods relevant to functional genomics. Cell function, gene regulation and protein expression. Microarray technology and use; cluster analysis; prediction of protein function. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 480. Recommended background: Basic knowledge of probability, statistics, vector algebra, calculus and cell biology.

590 Internship in Bioengineering
1 TO 4 hours. Current clinical practice experience in a health care setting culminating in a written and oral report. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): BIOE 430 and BIOE 431 and BIOE 479.

594 Advanced Special Topics in Bioengineering
1 TO 4 hours. Systematic review of selected topics in bioengineering theory and practice. Subjects vary from year to year. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

595 Seminar on Bioengineering
0 TO 1 hours. Recent innovations in bioengineering theory and practice presented by invited speakers, faculty and graduate students. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated. Students who are presenting seminars should register for 1 hour, others for 0 hour.

596 Independent Study
1 TO 5 hours. Research on special problems not included in thesis research. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

598 Masters Thesis Research
0 TO 16 hours. Research in M.S. thesis project. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term.

599 Ph.D. Thesis Research
0 TO 16 hours. Research in Ph.D. thesis project. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term.


Information provided by the Office of Programs and Academic Assessment.

This listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract. Every attempt is made to provide the most current and correct information. Courses listed here are subject to change without advance notice. Courses are not necessarily offered every term or year. Individual departments or units should be consulted for information regarding frequency of course offerings.