Physiology and Biophysics - PHYB


The information below lists courses approved in this subject area effective Fall 2014. Not all courses will necessarily be offered these terms. Please consult the Schedule of Classes for a listing of courses offered for a specific term.

500-level courses require graduate standing.

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301 Human Physiology and Pathophysiology I
5 hours. Designed for the College of Pharmacy. Physiology and pathophysiology of the nervous, cardiovascular, and excretory systems at the cell, tissue, organ, and system levels. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

302 Human Physiology and Pathophysiology II
5 hours. Continuation of PHYB 301. Physiology and pathophysiology of the blood, respiratory, endocrine, and reproductive systems. General pathology, mechanisms of disease. Prerequisite(s): PHYB 301 and enrollment in the Doctor of Pharmacy program.

321 Human Physiology for Dental Students I
2 hours. The major concepts involved in the regulation of living processes are introduced. The underlying homeostasis and communication mechanisms by which the major systems are interrelated are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): Credit or concurrent registration in a 300-level biochemistry course.

322 Human Physiology for Dental Students II
2 hours. Continuation of PHYB 321. A continuation of the major concepts involved in the regulation of living processes. The underlying homeostasis and communication mechanisms by which the major systems are interrelated are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): PHYB 321.

396 Independent Study
1 TO 4 hours. Independent study (non-laboratory) for advanced undergraduates majoring in appropriate disciplines. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

399 Laboratory Research
1 TO 4 hours. Laboratory research for advanced undergraduates majoring in appropriate disciplines. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

502 Physiology of Reproduction
2 hours. The purpose of this course is to enable students to acquire a detailed and up-to-date understanding of the Biology of Reproduction at both the physiological and molecular levels.

512 Gastrointestinal Physiology
2 hours. Advanced study of the physiology of the gastrointestinal tract. Special emphasis will be placed on recent developments in cellular and molecular aspects and on how they relate to established concepts in the literature. Prerequisite(s): PHYB 402 or consent of the instructor.

516 Physiology and Biochemistry of Muscle Contraction
2 hours. Structure and function of myosin, actin, tropomyosin, troponin, and the sarcoplasmic reticulum; control, energetics, and mechanism of muscle contraction; gene expression.

518 Cardiovascular Pathophysiology
3 hours. Focuses on pathogenesis and fundamental mechanisms of impaired cardiac performance due to systemic and cardiac disease. Function and pathology of diseased heart in relation to normal healthy states and therapeutic interventions. Prerequisite(s): GCLS 500 and either GCLS 501 or GCLS 502 or GCLS 503; or consent of the course coordinator.

523 Exercise Biology in Health and Disease
3 hours. Interrelationships between exercise and various pathological conditions. Current research focusing on molecular and cellular mechanisms in healthy and diseased states. Same as KN 523. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

530 Stem Cells
2 hours. Discussion of stem cell development into different cell types that may offer a renewable source of replacement cells to treat diseases, conditions, and disabilities. Cells from adult tissue, fetal tissue, and embryonic sources are discussed. Recommended background: Knowledge of cell biology.

540 Ion Channels: Structure, Function, Pharmacology and Pathology
2 hours. The concept of ion channels is treated from the perspectives of their molecular structures and functions. Modulation, pathological conditions (channelopathies), and pharmacological intervention will also be treated. Same as PCOL 540. Recommended background: One undergraduate course in biochemistry and one in physiology, or consent of the instructor.

551 Human Physiology I
5 hours. Lectures and conferences in human physiology. Emphasis is on cellular, nerve-muscle, cardiovascular, respiratory and renal physiology. Prerequisite(s): Mathematics, undergraduate physics, and organic chemistry; or consent of instructor. Recommended background: Course work in biological sciences.

552 Translational and Applied Physiology
3 hours. Continuation of GCLS 500 Physiology. Advanced physiological concepts emphasizing interactions of different organs and systems under normal and abnormal conditions. Review of compensatory mechanisms and clinical applications of physiology. Prerequisite(s): GCLS 500. Recommended background: Course work in biological sciences.

569 Methods in Experimental Physiology
3 hours. Primarily for students in physiology. Registration limited to eight. A laboratory course designed to acquaint students with advanced techniques and methodology in physiologic investigations. Prerequisite(s): Enrollment in the M.S. or Ph.D. in Physiology and Biophysics program, and credit or concurrent registration in PHYB 401 or the equivalent; or consent of the instructor.

585 Cell Biology
4 hours. Functional and structural organization of the cell with emphasis on the cellular basis of physiological activity. Same as ANAT 585 and MIM 585.

586 Cell Physiology
3 hours. Advanced functional and structural organization of the cell with emphasis on the cellular basis of physiological activity. Prerequisite(s): PHYB 552 and GCLS 501 and GCLS 503; or consent of the instructor.

590 Seminar in Cardiovascular Science
1 hours. Weekly seminars on advanced cardiovascular science topics by staff and invited speakers. Satisfactory/Unsatisactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Consent from the course coordinator. Enrollment is open to students following completion of their first year of graduate studies.

591 Departmental Seminar
1 hours. Weekly seminar by staff and invited speakers. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated. Required of all physiology and biophysics students each fall and spring semester while enrolled in the graduate program. Prerequisite(s): Graduate or professional standing.

592 Experimental and Diagnostic Methods in Cardiovascular Science
3 hours. Establishes the fundamental physical basis between diagnostic and experimental procedures in the clinic and basic science laboratory, combined with some direct observation of methods used for experimental approaches. Prerequisite(s): GCLS 500 and either GCLS 501 or GCLS 502 or GCLS 503; or consent of the course coordinator.

594 Special Topics in Physiology and Biophysics
1 TO 4 hours. Topics may include bioengineering, endocrinology, membrane biology, ion transport and its regulation, muscle physiology, neurophysiology, molecular neurobiology and others of current significance in physiology and biophysics. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

595 Journal Club and Seminar in Physiology
1 hours. Student presentation and discussion of assigned topics of current importance in physiology and biophysics as well as related fields. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor. Limited to degree candidates in physiology and biophysics.

596 Independent Study
1 TO 4 hours. Individual study guided by a faculty member. The format of the course, examination and grading to be established by the faculty member. May be repeated. Students may register in more than one section per term. Prerequisite(s): Consent of the instructor.

598 M.S. Thesis Research
0 TO 16 hours. Thesis work under the supervision of a graduate adviser. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing in physiology and biophysics.

599 Ph.D. Thesis Research
0 TO 16 hours. Thesis work under the supervision of a graduate adviser. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.


Information provided by the Office of Programs and Academic Assessment.

This listing is for informational purposes only and does not constitute a contract. Every attempt is made to provide the most current and correct information. Courses listed here are subject to change without advance notice. Courses are not necessarily offered every term or year. Individual departments or units should be consulted for information regarding frequency of course offerings.